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Oral Health and Dental Care

Do apples clean teeth?

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June 10, 2014 1:03PM

Yes, although not as well as a toothbrush and toothpaste.

Apples are a mildly acidic fruit. Because of their slightly astringent quality, they are an ideal food for cleansing and brightening teeth. The acidic nature of an apple is not enough to make a person's teeth pearly white. The acid needs the help of the fiber-rich flesh of the apple.

Crunchy foods, including apples, celery, and carrots, act like mini toothbrushes when they are chewed. The crunchy bits actually help scrub away stubborn stains. This does not happen in a day but will take a while. The cleansing effect may be noticeable, even if it's very slight, particularly if the apple eater is a coffee drinker who hadn't been eating apples every day to begin with.

After eating an apple, it's still important to brush your teeth. The apples still have sugar and acid in them which can damage the teeth. Leaving the sugar and acid on the teeth will reverse the benefits that eating an apple gave the teeth. Also, it's a good idea to brush away the loosened plaque from the teeth so that it cannot become reattached to the teeth. If a tooth brush is not available after an apple, rinsing the apple down with some water may be the next best thing.