Chemistry
Elements and Compounds
Boron

Does boron have 3 energy levels?

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December 19, 2014 6:52AM

Sort of but not exactly.A neutral isolated atom of boron has, nominally, three occupied electronic energy levels (1s, 2s, and 2p).

However, it has an infinite number of unoccupied energy levels (as do all atoms).

Also, in compounds, there's a strong tendency for the 2s and 2p orbitals to "hybridize", forming sp, sp2, or sp3 orbitals, each of which has its own characteristic energy level.



Boron does not have three energy levels. If you know the element's principle quantum number, then you can find how many electrons can fit in an atom of a specific element. In this case, Boron can only store 2p1/2 (p is the principle quantum number) electrons. This is getting too complex, and isn't required for you to know as of this exact moment. The answer is that Boron only has two energy levels.

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Wiki User
December 19, 2014 6:52AM

Boron does not have three energy levels. If you know the element's principle quantum number, then you can find how many electrons can fit in an atom of a specific element. In this case, Boron can only store 2p1/2 (p is the principle quantum number) electrons. This is getting too complex, and isn't required for you to know as of this exact moment. The answer is that Boron only has two energy levels.

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December 19, 2014 3:19AM

Sort of but not exactly.A neutral isolated atom of boron has, nominally, three occupied electronic energy levels (1s, 2s, and 2p).

However, it has an infinite number of unoccupied energy levels (as do all atoms).

Also, in compounds, there's a strong tendency for the 2s and 2p orbitals to "hybridize", forming sp, sp2, or sp3 orbitals, each of which has its own characteristic energy level.