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Answered 2010-06-08 15:27:31

Nope. There is no statute of limitations for collecting child support.

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Get a court order terminating support as of a specific date, with a finding as to the amount of arrearage, or that there is no arrearage. Then send certified copies to the child support agencies in your State and the State where the child lives and/or where any other orders were entered in the matter.


If you're living together with the child, no; in such a case, get an order terminating support and setting the arrearage or stating that no arrearage is owed.


No. Once you owe back child support (arrearage), you' will be paying until paid in full. There is no statute of limitations when child support is at issue, regardless of the age (s) of the child (ren).



Get a court order terminating support as of a specific date, with a finding as to the amount of arrearage, or that there is no arrearage. Then send certified copeis to the child support agencies in your State and the State where the child lives and/or any other orders were entered in the matter.


My suggestion: Get a court order terminating support as of a specific date, with a finding as to the amount of arrearage, or that there is no arrearage. Then send certified copies to the child support agencies in your State and the State where the child lives and/or where any other orders were entered in the matter.


No. There is no statute of limitations for collecting child support.


Assuming this is about a child support arrearage, the only legal excuses are misidentification and payment.


Yes. Don't assume that support will end automatically. My suggestion: Get a court order terminating support as of a specific date, with a finding as to the amount of arrearage, or that there is no arrearage. Then send certified copies to the child support agencies in your State and the State where the child lives and/or where any other orders were entered in the matter.


Get a court order terminating support as of a specific date, with a finding as to the amount of arrearage, or that there is no arrearage. Then send certified copies to the child support agencies in your State and the State where the child lives and/or where any other orders were entered in the matter.


No, you can't stop paying the arrearage. You can file a motion to terminate current/future payments since the child is now married, but you will still owe the arrearage.


I suggest that you contact your State's child support agency about collecting the arrearage. When you get an interview with them, bring all the papers relating to your child support: birth certificates, acknowledgments of paternity, court orders, payment records, etc. Be polite but persistent. Good luck!


Get a court order terminating support as of a specific date, with a finding as to the amount of arrearage, or that there is no arrearage. Then send certified copeis to the child support agencies in your State and the State where the child lives and/or any other orders were entered in the matter.


It means that you'll be paying your arrearage/back child support until paid in full, regardless the age of the child.


Get a court order terminating support as of a specific date, with a finding as to the amount of arrearage, or that there is no arrearage. Then send certified copies to the child support agencies in your State and the State where the child lives and/or where any other orders were entered in the matter. [Support may continue if the child is in college and/or severely disabled.]


Contact your attorney and file a "Motion of Amendment" to your court order and upon discovery of status of said child a judge will issue stop support order and you will be absolved of any child support payments except any arrearage that you might owe. If you owe any arrearage, that will still have to be paid.



By "compromising" the arrearage with the other parent and/or the State (and the court).


Child support arrears do not expire until they are paid.


Depends on the jurisdiction; in Illinois, it's a percentage of the amount of current support (generally, 20%).


Yes, if the court approves the agreement as being in the best interests of the child[ren].


File a motion to modifysee link below for opinion by Judge David Grey Ross, Commissioner of the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement on doing a retroactive modification.Another opinion.Child support orders cannot be modified retroactively, so it's going to be difficult if not impossible to "remove" the arrearage


Not if the State has certified to the Federal government that your arrearage exceeds $2,500.


If the court ordered support is in arrearage, all assets of the obligated parent are subject to seizure.



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