Dog Training
Dog Behavior

How can you train a dog not to kill Chickens?

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2017-02-14 09:25:37
2017-02-14 09:25:37

One view:

  • It's harder to train a puppy to leave the chickens alone than it is adult dogs. Sometimes the dog doesn't mean to kill the chicken; he is just playing with it and accidentally kills it. I just kept saying no and showing them the birds. If the dog is an adult and never been around chickens before, you have your work cut out for you. I trained all my dogs who did kill chickens not to. If they start to chase the chickens I firmly say "no" and they will stop.

Another view:

  • If your dog has decided to be a chicken killer, or it is genetically inbred into his breed to chase and kill birds, it is very hard to persuade him to do otherwise. Keep your chickens penned up in a secure enclosure so the dog can't get to them, and make sure your dog doesn't get out of your property - he could get shot if he goes after someone else's stock.

Another view:

  • All you have to do is to train the dog to be the chicken's best friend. Be calm when around the animal and never let the dog near the chickens unattended. To start off you have to do the correction at the right time. When you see a sign of aggression, fix it right away. When you do this, all you do is a gentle tap on its neck area and a word at the same time of the tap. You can say words like "no" or anything that makes you feel comfortable. Don't yell or the dog will get scared!

Another View:

  • I own a Pit Bull. He wont bother my chickens at all. Not even baby chicks running around on the yard. Although I dont agree with his previous owner about this, it did work and I seen him train many this way. I Raise gamefowl and many know gamefowl can be tempermental. The guy did too. The guy raised his pit bulls for fighting. I was at his home one day looking at the chickens I let him have and he showed me an old rooster that he had. It was blind and stuff from fighting a bigger rooster while he was a baby. He thought he was better I guess but in my oppinion its like a 8 year old fighting a 25 year old professional boxer. Anyhow the guys dog was running around and it just came up near me, it was the only pup he had left and his wife had taught it to stay close to home. I Fell in love with it but he kept talking about fighting him when it got older. I ended up getting attatched to him and he let me have him as long as I promised not to breed him and sell the bloodline. Anyhow the way he taught this dog and many before him was letting this blind rooster keep his spurs. He wouldnt trim the spurs. As the pups start messing with the chickens he would put the rooster out on a tie cord. The dog got too close and got a beating. He wouldnt get injured enough to need repairs, but he would just put peroxide on it, and neosporin, a few days of being on the yard with the bird he now knows to stay away. Since I raise the same fowl I was worried that moving him may make him not know the birds and him go back to trying to kill them. Since I have had him, I have seen him allow baby chicks to come up to his nose and eat with him. Ive seen them walk on him while lieing down and even trying to sit on his back as he walked. I know most of you wont try this but it worked, im not even sure id try it, but if it came to an emergency. I would dry anything as long as the dog wouldnt be seriously injured.

Another View:

  • An old method: If a dog is guilty of freshly killing a chicken or is caught in the act, tie the dead fowl to one end of the dog's lead and leave the two together for 24 hours. The dog will form a negative association to the dead fowl. This technique is still used effectively by farmers today.

Another View:

A gate was inadvertently left open this morning and by the time I got home at 1pm, our newly acquired 7 month old dog had caught and eaten our pet duck. There was nothing left but feathers. I am really concerned that this "habit" is going to be very hard to break. Tomorrow we are going to hold our ducks and chickens and familiarize the dog with the idea that the foul are important to us and must not be eaten.
We purchased day old chicks and kept them in a bin in the garage until they were old enough to put outside in the day. We made a pen covered with chicken wire on 5 sides (including top). We took the dogs out one at a time on a leash and showed them the chicks. We took them closer each time and for longer periods each time. Finally I just took a lawn chair out and the dogs and sat with them. I had a squirt bottle with water in it. When the dog(s) got too excited, I gave them a squirt and a "no!" We didn't let them actually get around the chickens without a chicken wire between them until the chickens were probably 12 weeks old. I had one person hold the dog on the ground with a leash holding their muzzle closed and I held the chicken letting the dog smell the chicken's butt and larger areas (no snipping off of heads that way!). I would let them sniff and say NO! They would try and "just taste them a little" nipping feathers and I would scold them with a stern NO! Next step was letting the chickens loose but keeping the dogs on leashes and letting them approach the chickens. When they would get too excited or nip, a pull on the leash and a NO! If they didn't back off, a harder pull on the leash and stronger scolding. Not until they would predictibly respond to a NO! without a pull on the leash did we do away with the leash. Then we only let them around the chickens when we were there to remind them and eventually just let them be. It may have helped that there was a rooster in the bunch, as he was not intimidated by the dogs and stood his ground. The whole process took about 2 weeks after the stage of the chickens being out of the pen. The dogs LOVE to go out and see the chickens and yes, they will chase them. They run into the flock, scatter them, make them squawk and scatter. That's all. I have even trained one cocker spaniel to round them up and herd them back to the area I prefer they stay in. He is very good. They have never hurt the chickens. We had 2 chicks this year that hatched. It seemed to be the "peeps" of the baby chicks that really set the dogs off. When they got to be about 10 weeks, we introduced the new chickens to the rest of the flock and to the dogs. The dogs were fine until the young chickens would make noise. It seemed to be the high pitch that excited them. Now that they chickens are about 15 weeks, their voices have changed and the dogs don't care anymore. Most dogs will accept whatever you tell them to. If you are the pack leader and tell them your hamster is part of the pack and work with them in a fashion similar to what I describe above, they should respect your wish that this hamster is family. Note: this would not apply to your neighbor's hamster. It would soon be lunch. Not a pack member, you see.

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Keep the dog inside and/or train the animal not to kill chickens.

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Umm... depending on how you train your dog has a BIG impact on weather it can guard chickens or not. We taught mine to hunt or kill small animals such as chickens so my dog couldn't possible guard chicken without eating them. But if you train your dog to guard chickens he could guard them but there is a small possibility that it may eat the chickens since that is what it was initially bred for.

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NO DOG SHOULD EVER KILL!!!!!!!! if you are trying to train a dog to kill rabit or small animals used for food then it just requires training.

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There are some things you can do to discourage them from killing the chickens but it will never be safe for them to be with chickens without supervision.If you teach the dog a good recall then you will be able to call the dog away anytime it attempts to chase and kill a chicken and you could reward calm behavior (such as lying down and ignoring the chickens).But depending on the dog's prey dive they may never be able to be around chickens safely so use your judgement and keep the chickens safety in mind when trying to train him to be around them.

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you need to contact a special dog trainer and he will do the job

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Neither both can kill. If chickens get caught in the net humans can something sharp to kill chickens but if the chickens tail or feather ripped off the chickens will kill humans with it's sharp claws.

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weasel, marten & foxes kill chickens

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Yes, bobcats kill and eat chickens.

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No it is no illegal to kill Chickens in public.

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People kill chickens every day, all around the world, so yes, humans CAN kill chickens.

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You can't make a dog scared of chickens, but you can train him to respect chickens as something that cannot be and should not be killed by over powering his predatory instinct. This takes training, knowing when the right time is to correct his actions before he goes into the attack mode, practice and dedication.

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Most dogs will kill chickens if they are not trained not to chase and kill things.

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Best to avoid terriers like Jack Russells and similar as it is their nature to catch and kill. Most dogs can be trained not to touch chickens if they are brought up that way from the start. A couple of the best breeds to train as they are intelligent are Labrador Retreivers and Border Collies. They may even be taught how to 'herd' the chickens like sheepdogs herd sheep. It will be more difficult if you have an older dog who is introduced to chickens for the first time, you may need professional help.

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The most common animal used to protect one's chickens is a canine. Perhaps train an outside dog to be friendly to livestock and hostile towards feral animals.

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The best way to kill chickens is to chop their head head off with an axe.

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Yes, a dog can be trained to not attack chickens. However, the level of difficulty and time required to do so may very depending on the dog (individual, age, breed, previous experiences with chicken etc) and its owner. Possible solutions: Introducing a rooster to the flock may deter a small dog or puppy from bothering the chickens. Closely supervise a dog and the chicken(s) in your yard, using a hose or spray bottle to squirt the dog every time it gets too close and or bothers the chickens. Consult an animal trainer.

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try to get them to hang out with each other play with them both at the same time or get a pro dog trainer.

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Wear full bronze and kill chickens. This is the only way to do it otherwise you will never get it.

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they kill about 20 chickens per day

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Yes. People kill chickens everyday by the thousand, all around the world.

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Well, if you DON'T want your dog to attack their chickens, you can just leash him with a leash. Good luck.

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Not if you mean "man-eating chickens" Chickens, being omnivores, will kill and eat small rodents and other animals. So the answer is yes, chickens can and will kill for food.

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Yes. Black bears will kill wild turkeys or chickens if they catch them, but they usually do not since wild chickens can fly.

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No. Possums do not kill chickens. The Virginia Opossum (which is not a possum) may exhibit different behaviour.

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Yes, raccoons will kill and eat chickens.


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