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2011-06-07 04:44:44
2011-06-07 04:44:44

Pressure and temperature are directly proportional to each other, temperature increases with the increase of pressure.

While pressure and volume are inversely proportional to each other. Volume decreases with the increase of pressure.

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To predict how temperature will affect the volume of a gas, pressure must remain constant. Volume in gases decreases with increase in pressure.


Because any one measurement of a gas depends on the other two. -- If you keep the pressure of a gas constant and change its temperature, the volume changes. -- If you keep the pressure of a gas constant and change its volume, the temperature changes. -- If you keep the temperature of a gas constant and change its pressure, the volume changes. -- If you keep the temperature of a gas constant and change its volume, the pressure changes. -- If you keep the volume of a gas constant and change its temperature, the pressure changes. -- If you keep the volume of a gas constant and change its pressure, the temperature changes.


With gasses, it's a three-way balance between pressure, temperature and volume. If you change one, you affect the other. When you release gas from a container, the the pressure and the temperature drops.



Volume and pressure are indirectly proportional - when one increases the other decreases. Provided temperature and the number of moles of gas remains the same, when pressure increases the volume will decrease.


Volume and temperature are directly proportional to each other and so when temperature is increased the volume also increase and vise virsa


P V = n R TThe product of (pressure) x (volume) is directly proportional to absolute temperature.So at constant temperature, they have to be inversely proportional to each other.In other words, if, at constant temperature, you increase either the pressure orthe volume of a sample of gas, the other one must decrease by the same factor.


If temperature is held constant, and either pressure or volume is increased, the other one is decreased.


Pressure is usually inversly proportional to volume, but proportional to temperature. All other things being equal, higher temperatures result in higher pressure, wheras higher volumes result in lower pressure.


Volume increases! If pressure is kept constant then temperature and volume are directly related to each other.(Charle's law). It states that:V1/T1 = V2/T2


If the temperature decreases, the volume is also going to decrease, and if the pressure decreases, the volume is going to increase. So they balance each other out, if they are decreased at the same rate.


that the temperature of a gas is directly proportional to its volume at constant pressure. In other words, if you increase the temperature of a gas, its volume will also increase.


Increase one and you increase the other (if the pressure remains the same).


Yes, the more the water the greater the pressure of all the water pushing down on other water.


The speed of a wave is principally determined by the molecular density (number of molecules/volume)and to a lesser degree mass density (mass/volume). Other factors such as temperature, pressure, state, etc. affect these first two factors, and thus affect the speed of sound in the medium.


The pressure and volume of a gas at a constant temperature are inversely proportional to each other.


Charles Law is that at a constant pressure the volume of a fixed amount of a gas varies directly as the absolute temperature (degrees Kelvin). In other words volume = constant x temperature. But it must be the absolute temperature you use, that is 273 + degrees Celsius.


Volume and pressure vary indirectly, which means that when one goes up, the other goes down. If the pressure goes up, the volume goes down. If the volume goes up, the pressure goes down.Mathematically:P1V1 = P2V2The left side represents the beginning conditions, and the right side represents the pressure and temperature that have changed. Note that this formula assumes constant mass and temperature.


Because, at a constant volume, a change in one directly changes the other.


The pressure and volume are inversely proportional. If you double one, the other will be reduced by 1/2 (as long as the temperature is constant). Boyles law states: P1V1/T1= P2V2/T2 In English that means, pressure times volume divided by temperature in the first "state" will equal to pressure times volume divided by temperature in the second state. Temperatures are all converted to degrees kelvin. So, calculate the pressure, temperature and volume of a quantity of a gas, change one of the variables of that quantity of gas for the second state and the other values will change to maintain equality. See the Related Question link to the left of this page. = "How do you solve an Ideal Gas Law problem?" =


The pressure of a gas would be reduced by half if the volume of the container doubled, provided that no other change occurred. Pressure and volume are inversely proportional. The relationship between the two is known as Boyle's law. In brief, the volume of a gas changes inversely with the pressure of the gas if the temperature and quantity of gas remain constant.


The mass of compressed natural gas is not related to pressure. If you learn about the ideal gas laws you will see that pressure is related to two other variables, which are temperature and volume. The higher the temperature, the greater the pressure, and the smaller the volume into which a given quantity of gas is contained, the greater the pressure. Mass is not relevant, because any mass of a gas, whether from one microgram to a billion tons, can exist at any pressure, depending upon the variables of temperature and volume.


Charles' Law: Temperature and volume are directly related. If one goes up, so does the other (provided that P and n remain constant). So, its the same with liquids


I guess you're talking about the PV=nRT equation; well the volume of a gas depends on the temperature so of course the temperature must be kept constant or your pressure will be affected. The moles of the gas will also affect the pressure. Usually this equation is used to calculate the number of moles it will take to occupy a certain volume or vice versa at standard temperature and pressure: 1 atm and 0 degrees Celcius.


No. If the temperature of a gas increases at least one of the other two values must increase as well.



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