Friendship
Funerals

How do you comfort a friend whose closest relative just died?

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2014-08-26 15:17:23
2014-08-26 15:17:23

You are doing the very best you can by just being there. You're a wonderful friend and your heart is in the right place. There isn't much you can do, but just listen to your friend and let them cry, talk, or just sit quietly by because sometimes people don't have to talk at all to give comfort. It's extremely normal and a necessity for each of us to grieve when we lose a loved one. Without proper grieving time we would never heal completely. We have to do what that passage says, "If you love something, set it free." That's the hard part for all of us. I noticed that when someone loses a loved one everyone gathers around for support, but what stands out more to me, is the fact that a month or two down the road when everything quiets down, people have to go about their daily lives and it's particularly at this time that your friend will need you. When I have a family member or friend going through the loss of someone, I am there, but I call it "idling" (I listen, hug, understand and I'm there, but I let other people around my friend pick up the ball and run with it.) This way, when my friend really needs more support a few months down the road I'm there 100%. God Bless Marcy Answer Coincidentally, my grandmother just died last week, and it was really hard to tell my friends why I was so sad the past few days. I actually didn't even want to tell them, but I didn't want to make it seem as if I was depressed or something. And the best things my friends did were they gave me hugs and said it was going to be okay and that now she's in a better place. But I hated it when they kept on asking questions, like when was the funeral or what did she die of? It just made me want to cry, so don't ask questions. I'm not trying to sound really emotional or anything but that's the truth. I wish the best of luck to you!

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Related Questions


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