Magnetism

How do you make a magnet with two south poles or north poles?

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2010-10-07 10:02:42
2010-10-07 10:02:42

It is not possible to create a magnet with two south poles or two north poles. Both the poles always exist along with each other.

Force 2 magnets together end to end with the south poles together. You will get a north pole at each end and a big south pole in the middle. This arrangement is called a quadrupole.

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by aliginig the domains in the north and south poles of the meterial


To identify the north pole of a magnet, make a compass out of it by hanging it on a string or floating it on water. The pole that faces geographic north is the north pole. Once you have a magnets poles labelled, you can use it to identify orientation and poles on another magnet since like poles repel and opposite poles attract.Alternative AnswerEasier still, use a compass! A compass always points to the south magnetic pole of a magnet.


The reason is because of the magnetic fields of the north and south poles


Yes,every magnet has a north pole and a south pole.IF YOU WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE SOUTH AND THE NORTH POLES :If you have a magnet and you make a line exactly in the middle you will see that one side is the north pole and the other one is a south pole . You can even experiment this : when you are done drawing a line cut your magnet by that line . Do you think that you will have two magnets and one of them is south pole and the other one is the north pole . Well no !!!!!! You will have two magnets but both of them have south and north poles.Now:Remember , you know this magnets attach to each other .But north pole and an other north pole will never attach to each other.And the same thing goes for the south poles. Two south poles will never atach.Only two different poles will attach to each other ( north and south will attach, and south and north will attach to each other as well).ALL magnets have one north pole and one south pole.


A magnet has a polarity, in that one end is the "north" and the other is the "south". Opposite poles attract but similar poles repell each other. You cannot make the north poles of two magnets stick together.


Because u make 2 magnets half the size of the original one.


A horseshoe magnet has a North pole one one of the feet and a south pole on the other. A magnet made of flexible material would collapse on itself as the two poles attract.


the north and south poles'


The poles on a spherical magnet are at the positive side and the negative side. Just like that of our earth which has both a north and south pole. The magnetic field is described as loops going from the north pole too the south pole, just as a normal bar magnet would behave. However a spherical electromagnet can be made such that the poles are constantly changing and never in one spot for too long. The answer to your question is impossible without more information or experimentation with the magnet. An easy way to test which is north and south is to hang the magnet on a string and then positively or negatively charge a nylon rod by rubbing a material on it(google which will make it negative or positivel) and hold it near all the sides. One side will be repulsed then that would be the sign of whatever the rod is charged with. I hope that this long winded answer helps.As a note north is positive and south is negative


Just like a battery has a + and a - in it, a magnet has a South (S) and a North (N) ple in it. Both have the same amount of energy in them which attracts things like iron towards them. Sorry if this answer doesn't make sense to u but that's the best I can do.


Every magnet has at least one "North" and one "South" pole where its magnetic forces leave the magnet and enter its surroundings. It is commonly thought that the magnetic forces leave one pole and enter the other pole. The magnetic force field tries to make a loop toward the other pole as it leaves one of the poles. The poles of a horseshoe magnet are closer than those of a bar magnet therefore concentrating the forces between those poles and making the attraction/repulsion stronger. duh.


Every magnet has at least one "North" and one "South" pole where its magnetic forces leave the magnet and enter its surroundings. It is commonly thought that the magnetic forces leave one pole and enter the other pole. The magnetic force field tries to make a loop toward the other pole as it leaves one of the poles. The poles of a horseshoe magnet are closer than those of a bar magnet therefore concentrating the forces between those poles and making the attraction/repulsion stronger. duh.


You can't make a magnet with only one pole. Every magnet, whether natural or electro- , has two opposite poles. One pole is attracted to Earth's north magnetic pole and repelled by Earth's south magnetic pole. The other one is attracted to Earth's south magnetic pole and repelled by Earth's north magnetic pole. For the same reason, there's no such thing as "repel Earth's magnetic field" because Earth itself is a giant magnet, and also has two poles. One of them attracts one end of any magnet, and the other one repels one end of any magnet. Make any electromagnet you like, and figure out a way to hang it up and let it turn freely. It'll line up with its ends pointing to the Earth's north and south magnetic poles.


to make a magnet repel a metal, one must first understand the properties of a magnet. A magnet has two poles, a north pole and a south pole. When magnets are placed near each other, opposite poles attract and like poles repel one another. When a metal enters a magnetic field, all of the electrons inside the metal "line up," causing a temporary magnetic alignment that is attracted to the magnet (the pole doesn't matter). That alignment dissipates once the magnetic field is removed and therefore, the only way for a metal to be repelled by a magnet is if it's first magnetized to the opposite pole.


Either AC or DC will do it, but usually a DC source (battery or rectified AC) is preferable, as the North and South poles won't keep changing ends


Good question.Historically, magnetic polarity was described in terms of a magnet's behavior when suspended from a string, or placed upon a float in bowl of water. If you suspend a bar magnet from a string, for example, one end will eventually point in a northerly direction, the other, toward the south. This is due to the interaction between the suspended magnet and earth's magnetic field. This is also the mechanism by which magnetic compasses work.The pole of the magnet that points toward the geographic north can be described as the "north seeking pole" of the bar magnet, and the other end, the "south seeking pole." Over time, people have contracted and condensed these phrases and refer to the poles as "north poles" and "south poles" respectively. What is important to remember is that we are talking about polarity here, nothing else.Let's suppose, now, that you have two bar magnets, and let's further suppose that you (or somebody else) has marked the poles on those magnets with paint or ink to identify the north and south seeking poles.If you play with these magnets for just a few minutes, you will quickly discover two rules with regard to magnetic attraction and repulsion. Like poles repel. Unlike poles attract. Thus, if you bring the north-seeking poles of the two magnets together, they will repel. If you bring the north-seeking pole of one magnet to the south-seeking pole of the other, they will attract and stick together.Knowing this, let's go back to the bar magnet suspended by a string. The only way the "north seeking" end of the bar magnet would be attracted toward the northerly direction of the earth is if the "north" magnetic pole of the earth actually has a south-seeking polarity (remember, UN-alike poles attract.)Thus, the north magnetic pole of the earth actually has a south-seeking polarity.All of this really does make sense, but confusion reigns because the same phrase, "north pole" is used to represent more than one idea. "North pole" can mean geographic north, which lies on the axis on which the earth spins, it refer to the place in the northern hemisphere from which the earth's lines of magnetic flux emerge, or it can refer to the magnetic polarity of a magnet.Additional CommentIt might help if people understood that 'Magnetic North' and 'Magnetic South' are locations, not magnetic polarities.


Of course . You can make such a magnet easily using a safety pin. Take a safety pin and magnetize it using a permanent magnet. Then unfold it. The ends will have same poles and at the middle you will have the other. So you can have a magnet with three poles. Verify it using compass.


to make sure the north and south poles stay even :)


Hold a magnet in front of it and rotate the magnet around the compass. Then it will not point North/South.


If they are both magnets, and they are the same poles facing each other (e.g. south repels south and north repels north).


Hi there magnets work this way North to North Repels South to South Repels but South To north attracts. If you have unmarked magnets or they just repel your magnet may be dogy stroke it with another magnet one way this will make it a stronger magnet and correct it if ome f the fibres are running in different directions.


Using another magnet to push (same magnetic poles repel), or pull (opposites attract).


Yes a magnet has a north pole and a south pole. Magnets generate a magnetic field that "flows" in one direction. To make it easy to understand how two magnets interact, scientists and physicists assign names of "North" and "South" to the opposite ends of the magnet. Some magnets can reverse direction.


On your map or globe, make a tiny dot that's exactly halfway between the north and south poles. Then turn the globe a bit and make another dot. Then make a million or a trillion more, each one exactly halfway between the north and south poles. When you have enough dots, they'll blend together to look like a line around the Earth's 'middle', halfway between the poles. That's the equator.


When an iron piece is quite away from the magnet ,i.e, not present in magnetic field of the magnet then the iron piece is in neutral state ,i.e, there is no north & south pole . But , as soon as the iron piece interacts with magnetic field of magnet ,i.e, near to the magnet then the north pole of magnet make the nearer part or end of the iron piece south pole & simultaneously other part of iron becomes north pole . Similarly if south pole of the magnet interacts with iron piece then that end/part becomes north pole & other end becomes north pole . Now this iron piece has north & south pole .So iron piece is now converted into magnet which can attract other iron pieces in similar way as explained before .



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