answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

A thermometer says the temperature is 34 degrees ceentigrade. The divisions are so close you could only decide it is 34 rather than 33 or 35. So its precision is one degree. If the specification for that thermometer is plus or minus 3 degrees then you only really know it is between 31 and 37. If its precision is plus or minus one degree you know it is between 33 and 35.

User Avatar

Wiki User

11y ago
This answer is:
User Avatar
More answers
User Avatar

Wiki User

13y ago

Accuracy: whether the measurement is true or not.

Precision: you got the right answer, but how close are you to the true value.

This answer is:
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: How does accuracy differ from precision in a scientific measurement?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Related questions

How does accuracy differ from precision a scientific measurement?

Accuracy is the tendency for a measurement to be correct. A more accurate measurement will be closer to the true value than a less accurate measurement. Precision is the tendency to come to the same measurement under the same conditions on multiple occasions. A precise measurement may not be accurate, but can be reproduced time after time and give the same (or sImilar) result.


How does acceracy differ from precision in scientific measurement?

Accuracy refers to how close the results are to the established (or predicted) values. Experimentally, accurate results are evidence that the procedure worked as expected and that the combined error from all sources (instrumental, environmental, and human) is low. Precision refers to how close the results are to each other. Highly precise results will indicate that the experiment was run (nearly) identically each time, though it will not guarantee accuracy.


If some measurements agree closely but differ widely from the actual value?

Then they have precision but not accuracy.


How does accurancy differ from precision in a scientific measurement?

Consider someone firing a rifle at a target. If their shots centre around the bullseye, they were accurate, even if the scatter is quite large. If the scatter is very small (i.e. all the shots are very clustered) they were very precise - even if that cluster is far from the bullseye. So accuracy: how on target are you. Precision: How much spread is there around the target?


How does quantum uncertainty differ from the uncertainty involved in a coin flip?

completely: coin is simple probability, quantum uncertainty is based on how increasing accuracy of measurement of one property of a tiny particle reduces the accuracy of measurement of another complementary property of the same particle. No probability there, just measurement limitations.


How does the last digit differ from the other digits in a measurement?

The last digit in a measurement indicates the level of precision or uncertainty in the measurement. It is typically an estimate and can vary depending on the instrument's precision or the person taking the measurement. The other digits are considered to be more reliable and accurate in conveying the measurement value.


How does a parameter and a statistic differ?

A parameter is a numerical measurement of a population; a statistic is a numerical measurement of a sample.


Would your vital capacity measurement differ if you performed the test while standing While lying down Explain?

would your vital capacity measurement differ if you performed the test while standing


How does the project audit differ from the performance measurement control system?

How does the project audit differ from the performance measjrement control system


How do scientific theries differ from scientific laws?

Theories are observations held to be true based on their application to observation and proven scientific laws.


Why is it best for scientific to use the scientific name of an organism instead of a common name?

Scientific names never differ among scientists.


How does a scientific theory differ from an idea?

This a Study Island Question. The answer is "Scientific Theories are supported by evidence or data."