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Answered 2011-03-06 03:10:41

The First Law of Thermodynamics is the Law of Conservation of Energy. Just different names for the same thing.

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The 1st Law of thermodynamics is a restatement of the law of conservation of energy.



Yes - the 1st law of thermodynamics is often referred to as "the law of conservation of energy". They are the same thing.


The First Law of Thermodynamics is a restatement of the Principle or Law of Conservation of Energy.



It is related to the 2nd law of thermodynamics


The first law of thermodynamics is also called the law of conservation of energy.it may be stated as: 1st Statement: in this universe energy can neither be created nor destroyed though it may change from one form to another.


It can be said that anything is an example, since the Law of Conservation of Energy has never found to be violated.For more specific examples, think about some energy transformations, and try to understand where the energy went. Usually, most wasted energy will be converted to heat.




The first law of thermodynamics states that you can't create or destroy energy. The second law of thermodynamics has been formulated in several ways; one of them is that useful energy is constantly being converted to useless energy - in other words, with respect to energy, there are irreversible processes in nature.


Transfer of energy is explained by 1st law of thermodynamics. According to first law of thermodynamics , energy can be transferred or transformed form one form or the other but the total quanta of energy remains constant. The total energy in the universe is constant.


Nothing. 1st Law of Thermodynamics: energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only change form.


It is assumed as part of the second law, but the second law is really all about what happens to the energy as it changes form. If energy were not conserved (1st Law), then it might be possible to violate the second law by magically creating some energy out of nowhere to allow the work coming out of a system to be equal to the energy input even when some is lost to heat.


That would significantly violate the second law of thermodynamics. For water to spontaneously freeze at room temperature, there would have to be something colder than the freezing point to absorb the energy coming out of the water. If the floor also became cooler, then it could not be absorbing energy. If you had ONLY the water and the floor, then this would also violate the 1st law - conservation of energy.


You can't get ahead (1st law - conservation of energy - you can't get more energy out than you put in) You can't even break even (2nd law - 100% efficiency is not possible - some energy will always be lost as heat to the surroundings, thus increasing the overall entropy of the universe) You can't get out of the game (no real process is reversible)


FIRST COROLLARY OF THE 1ST LAW: -the application of the conservation of energy to the closed system. Closed system is also known as "control mass". It could either be a non-flow or steady flow closed system. SECOND COROLLARY OF THE 1ST LAW: -the application of the conservation of energy to an open system. Open system is also called "control volume". There are 2 types of open system. The unsteady/transient flow open system. *control surface= boundary



The 1st Law of Thermodynamics tells us that energy is neither created nor destroyed, thus the energy of the universe is a constant. However, energy can certainly be transferred from one part of the universe to another. To work out thermodynamic problems we will need to isolate a certain portion of the universe, the system, from the remainder of the universe, the surroundings. This is also known as thelaw of conservation of energy.The first law of thermodynamics is the application of the conservation of energy principle to heat and thermodynamic processes. The first law makes use of the key concepts of internal energy, heat, and system work. It is used extensively in the discussion of heat engines. The standard unit for all these quantities would be the joule, although they are sometimes expressed in calories or BTU (British thermal unit).The total energy in the universe is present either as kinetic energy or as potential energy.A simple example can be of water stored in a dam. This water has a potential energy due to its height. now when this water falls down, this potential energy is converted into kinetic energy. This kinetic energy then rotates the turbines and electricity is produced. So the potential energy gets converted to kinetic energy which in turn helps us to produce electricity and thereby the total energy remains constant.


false The law of conservation of energy (also known as the 1st law of thermodynamics) states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed. There is one caveat to that, however. If you include the famous equation E=M Csquared (couldn't get the superscript to show up there), then mass and energy are conserved, not just energy. In a fusion reaction, for example, the "mass" posessed by the nuclear potential energy released is large enough to represent a loss of mass to the original material (also known as the "mass defect"). This nuclear potential energy normally shows up as included in the mass of the system before the reaction so it appears that energy has been created. The analogous release of electrical energy in some chemical reactions is too small to create a measurable mass defect.


The first law of thermodynamics states that you can't create or destroy energy.The second law of thermodynamics has been formulated in several ways; one of them is that useful energy is constantly being converted to useless energy - in other words, with respect to energy, there are irreversible processes in nature. Another way to phrase it is that heat only flows from higher temperature to lower temperature spontaneously. To move heat from a low temperature to a higher temperature, you must do work - that's why you have to plug in your refrigerator and your power bill is higher during the summer when you run your air conditioning.


Energy flows from one type toanother following the laws of thermodynamics. The 1st law states that no energy is created or destroyed, and the 2nd law states that energy will move from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration or that the entropy of a closed system will remain constant or diminish.


In my opinion this question highlights the conflict between the 2 laws of thermodynamics.The First Law of Thermodynamics (Conservation) states that energy is always conserved, it cannot be created or destroyed. In essence, energy can be converted from one form into another.The Second Law of Thermodynamics states that in all energy exchanges, if no energy enters or leaves the system, the potential energy of the state will always be less than that of the initial state. This is also commonly referred to as entropy.Therefore if an 'expanding' or 'exploding' singularity created the Universe, the 1st Law states that all of the energy within that initial singularity must still be present in the Universe today and must remain within the Universe 'if' no energy enters or leaves the system.Whereas the 2nd Law states that potential energy of the Universe will always be less than that of the initial state.Some Physicists theorize that a Black Hole eventually decays, consuming the total energy within it - meaning energy leaves the system . . . and therefore abolishing both Laws of Thermodynamics in the process.Others suggest a multi-verse, or multiple string dimensional universe . . . which means that 'energy enters the system', also abolishing both Laws of Thermodynamics is the process.However, if the initial energy from the Big Bang remains in the Universe, The 1st Law leaves open the possibility that eventually another Big Bang could occur within the Universe, meaning that the Universe possibly could be more unstable than previously presumed, while the 2nd Law completely rules that possibility out.Basically, physicist's, astrophysicist's and quantum physicist's still do not know the nature of our universe completely, nor the eventual outcome of the Universe. All is still theory.


No The 1st law only addresses the conservation of energy in an isolated system. It puts no limits on the transformation of that energy from one form to another so long as the total energy remains unchanged. The second law deals with what happens when energy changes from one form to another. One way to look at it is that any time you use energy, you wind up "losing" some the useful energy to heat. The energy isn't really "lost", it just has changed into a form that is generally less useful, i.e. harder to use for work (remember - work is also a form of energy).



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