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How many inches is baseball stitching?

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2007-09-24 14:02:00
2007-09-24 14:02:00

6 stiches per inch

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There are 216 raised stitches according to Rawlings, the manufacturer of baseballs for MLB. Red cotton thread measuring 88 inches is used in the stitching.

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These are different types of stitching that you can do. Baseball will look a lot like the stitching that goes around the ball while rosary beads are small little dots.

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Yes, it has the red stitching

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the stitching on a baseball is there so you can throw different pitches such as a curveball. The stiches make the ball move different ways depending on how u grip it and how you throw it

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The two figure-8 coverings are stapled to the wound ball, then they are hand-sewn together using 88 inches of waxed red thread. There are 108 double stitches (216) in the sewing process, with the first and last completely hidden. An average of 13 to 14 minutes is required to hand-sew a baseball. In the past Baseball Stitching clamps were used to secure the baseball during the process of sewing on the cover by hand. In the early days the wooden clamps were made by locale woodworkers or carpenters. The baseballs were both sewn at the factories or at home, the work done mostly by women. Below I will leavea link to a vintage baseball stitching clamp that was used at the Draper-Maynard factory.

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Red Stitched baseballsThe American League baseballs with the Reach Trademark had Red & Blue stitching, and the National League Spalding Trademark baseballs had Black & Red stitching up until about 1934-1935 when in both league started using only red stitching. Red stitching is still used today but occasional a commemorative baseball is used and they might use different color stitching. For example: A black stitching commemorative baseball was used on August 25, 1996 at Yankee Stadium in honor of Mickey Mantle. The commemorative baseballs must be approved by MLB.

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probably to remind them of America

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2 3/8 inches to 3 inches in diameter

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American League baseballs with the Reach Trademark had Red & Blue stitching, and the National League Spalding Trademark baseballs had Black & Red stitching up until about 1934/35 when in both league started using only red stitching. If you have an official baseball you need to "analyze" the stamping on the baseball. You can the narrow down the era the baseball was made by the name of the league President that appears on the ball. Trademarks could also aid in dating the ball. See Related Links below for a Baseball dating guide. If the baseball does not have any markings then it will be difficult to date. The baseball you have has red, and black stitching as the national league baseballs did, and will date the baseball pre-1935. Non-Official balls might have been made after 1935 as well. Without any markings on the baseball it will have a lower collectors value.

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Most cross-stitching sets come with everything included.

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The dimensions of a five-sided baseball home plate are: 17 inches by 8 1/2 inches by 8 1/2 inches by 12 inches by 12 inches, cut to a point at rear.

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Stay stitching is a type of stitch that ensures unraveling will not happen. Stay stitching is often used in seams.

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A Stitch in TimeAmerican League baseballs with the Reach Trademark had Red & Blue stitching, and the National League Spalding Trademark baseballs had Black & Red stitching up until about 1934/35 when in both league they started to use just red stitching.

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The present day ball stitching machines, are used as a thread tightening device. The stitching thread control device tightly clamps the stitching thread for manufacturing the finished baseball so that the worker only needs to use minimum force to pull and set the stitches on balls. The operation of this device is convenient for workers. In the past Baseball Stitching clamps were used. This device was used to secure the baseball during the process of sewing on the cover by hand. In the early days the clamps were made of wood by locale woodworkers or carpenters, and later made of metal. The baseballs were both sewn at the factories or at home, the work done mostly by women. Two pieces of figure-eight-shaped cowhide is dampened to permit pliability and placed around a string wound core, then placed in the stitching clamp. The covers are stapled together to hold in place for stitching. The baseball is then hand-stitched together with 216 raised stitches. It takes about 13-14 minutes to hand sew a baseball. For more information on Baseball Stitching clamps, along with pictures I will leave a link below. -Steven KeyMan

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yes The present day ball stitching machines, are used as a thread tightening device. The stitching thread control device tightly clamps the stitching thread for manufacturing the finished baseball so that the worker only needs to use minimum force to pull and set the stitches on balls. The operation of this device is convenient for workers. In the past Baseball Stitching clamps were used. This device was used to secure the baseball during the process of sewing on the cover by hand. In the early days the clamps were made of wood by locale woodworkers or carpenters, and later made of metal. The baseballs were both sewn at the factories or at home, the work done mostly by women. Two pieces of figure-eight-shaped cowhide is dampened to permit pliability and placed around a string wound core, then placed in the stitching clamp. The covers are stapled together to hold in place for stitching. The baseball is then hand-stitched together with 216 raised stitches. It takes about 13-14 minutes to hand sew a baseball. For more information on Baseball Stitching clamps, along with pictures I will leave a link below. -Steven KeyMan

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several parallel rows of stitching creating a design on the fabric

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There are many books available about crotchet stitching, many of which one could get from your local library. Recently there has been a magazine released about learning to crotchet also called 'Inside Crotchet'.

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In many ways, including, stitching, gluing and nailing.

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The stitching on a cricket ball is called the equator or the seam.

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The stitching on a cricket ball is often called seam.

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American League baseballs with the Reach Trademark had Red & Blue stitching, and the National League Spalding Trademark baseballs had Black & Red stitching up until about 1934/35 when in both league started using only red stitching. An Official American League William Harridge baseball from 1932 is worth about $500. An Official National League John Heydler baseball from 1932 is worth about $900. I will leave a link to a official baseball dating guide complete with pictures and league president.

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The stitching is part of it, I think, but primarily I think it's the fabric, the denim.

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It is a ballIt is made of leatherIt has red stitchingIt is thrown by the pitcherIt is hit by the batterIt is caught by the catcher

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mainly leather on the surface. most balls have a rubber core, the stitching on the surface is red thread

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Stitching a leather cover together on a baseball is quite simple. It is just like tying shoes where you cross the laces and pull.


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