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Answered 2011-02-27 00:10:02

The cube has 6 possible outcomes.

The coin has 2 possible outcomes.

There are 6 x 2 = 12 possible outcomes for a trial

that involves both the cube and the coin.

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The sample space for rolling a die is [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] and the sample space for tossing a coin is [heads, tails].


The sample space consists of the following four outcomes: TT, TH, HT, HH


The sample space for this situation is all the possible outcomes that could be achieved. Like H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, and T6 are the outcomes for flipping a Coin and rolling a number cube.


11 outcomes if the dice are indistinguishable, 36 otherwise.




The sample space of tossing a coin is H and T.


Not sure about the relevance of sizzle! The size of the sample space is 46656.


Two outcomes (H,T) flipped 3 times is 23 or 8.


Flipping a coin: two possible outcomes, H or T. Rolling a die: six possible outcomes, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6. Flipping a coin and rolling a die: 12 possible outcomes. So the sample space has 12 outcomes such as, {H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6 }


Assuming traditional cubic dice, the sample space consists of 216 points.


There is 2 outcomes for flipping the coin, and 6 outcomes for rolling the cube. The total outcomes for both are 2*6 = 12.


There is 6 possible outcomes per roll of a die. So, there are 6*6*6*6 outcomes or 64 or 1296 possible outcomes.


There is 2 outcomes for flipping the coin, and 6 outcomes for rolling the cube. The total outcomes for both are 2*6 = 12.


You find the sample space by enumerating all of the possible outcomes. The sample space for three coins is [TTT, TTH, THT, THH, HTT, HTH, HHT, HHH].


There is insufficient information in the question to properly answer it. Please restate the question and, this time, provide the details for the spinner, such as the number of results, i.e. the sample space.


impossible or 1/6 * * * * * No! The sample space refers to the set of possible outcomes, not the probability of any one outcome.


(1,2,3,4,5,6][Heads,Tails] is a depiction of this notation. It is an expression of probability.


The set of all possible outcomes of a random experiment is nothing but sample space usually denoted by S. we can also call it as event. For example our experiment is rolling a dice, then our sample space is S= {1,2,3,4,5,6}


It all depends on what you do with the information that you note. If you count up the number of odds [or evens] in the five rolls, your sample space is {0,1,2,3,4,5} with size 6. If you look for whether you had more odds than evens your sample space is {Y,N}, with size 2. If you subtract the number of even outcomes from the number of odd outcomes, your sample space is {-5,-4,,...,4,5} which is of size 11.


The sample space for tossing a coin twice is [HH, HT, TH, TT].


The sample space consists of all the possible outcomes. A flip of a coin has 2 outcomes, H,T. The total number of outcomes for 6 flips are 26 or 64.


When a fair die is rolled, there are 6 possible outcomes {1,2,3,4,5,6}. The sample space consists of 6 points, so its size is 6.


It depends on how many sides your die has. If it has 6 sides, then there are 6 possible out comes.


There are 6 sides of a die, and rolling a 3 is one of the 6 sides. Therefore, there are 5 sides on the die which is not a 3. So, (outcomes wanted)/(total outcomes) = 5/6