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2014-05-08 10:57:54
2014-05-08 10:57:54

It uses 60 joules of energy every second, which is 60 watt-hours or 0.06 kilowatt-hours every hour.

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energy is energy It does not matter what you are using the energy for, it matters how much energy you are using A 200 watt light bulb uses more energy than a 100 watt light bulb A 200 watt motor uses more energy than a 100 watt light bulb A 200 watt heater uses more energy than a 100 watt light bulb


Look at the watt rating printed on the bulb, then multiply by the number of hours it runs for, the answer is the energy in watt-hours.



Assuming the bulb is connected to the proper voltage, all 60 watts of energy are "lost" in a light bulb, mostly converted to heat and a small amount as visible light. If you meant how much energy is used to create a 60 watt bulb, that's completely different.


A 150-watt light bulb uses energy at the rate of 150 watts, when it's turned on.


The energy is 95 x 40 watt-seconds (Joules).



Not in energy used. But possibly in light produced.


The 60 watt bulb will consume less energy and not be as bright as a 100 watt bulb. Most bulb sockets will specify a recommended bulb rating.


This depends on how long it is being used. The 60 Watt bulb consumes 2.6667 times the power of an 18 Watt bulb, but energy equals power times time. There is also an amount of 'hidden' energy: the energy to manufacture and transport the bulb. This depends on how long it is being used. The 60 Watt bulb consumes 2.6667 times the power of an 18 Watt bulb, but energy equals power times time. There is also an amount of 'hidden' energy: the energy to manufacture and transport the bulb.


More watts means it uses more energy per second (watt is a unit of power). If it is a light-bulb of the same type of technology, the higher-watt light bulb would also give off more light.More watts means it uses more energy per second (watt is a unit of power). If it is a light-bulb of the same type of technology, the higher-watt light bulb would also give off more light.More watts means it uses more energy per second (watt is a unit of power). If it is a light-bulb of the same type of technology, the higher-watt light bulb would also give off more light.More watts means it uses more energy per second (watt is a unit of power). If it is a light-bulb of the same type of technology, the higher-watt light bulb would also give off more light.


A 25 watt light bulb consumes 25 watts per hour. Watts are the unit of power, and 1 Watt = the conversion of I joule of energy per second so a 25W lamp is using 25J/s of energy.


The higher the wattage, the more electrical energy is being used. In a light bulb the electrical energy is converted to EM energy which appears in both visible and infrared parts of the spectrum, so the answer is no, it will be at a higher rate for a 100 watt bulb


What is meant by the term "total energy"? A 100 watt light bulb consumes 100 watts.


The energy is 60 x 63 watt-seconds, also known as Joules.


100 Joules = 100 watt second = energy1 joule = 1 watt second


Yes, because the "higher" watt energy saver bulb (cfl) is actually a lower watt bulb than a standard (incandescent). Always look at the actual watts, not the 'light equivalent watts'. 11 watt low energy tube = 60 watts of old-fashioned light. More light, less heat!


A 60 Watt bulb uses a power of 60 Watts as long as it is switched on. Power is the rate of converting energy. In one hour, the energy used is 60 Watt-hours. One Watt-hour is an amount of energy equal to 3600 Joules.



"50 watts" means 50 joules of energy every second. "100 watts" means 100 joules of energy every second. In equal lengths of time, the 100-watt device uses twice as much energy as the 50-watt device does.


Electrically, a 10-watt bulb uses 75% less energy than a 40-watt bulb. For the same circuit voltage, let's say 120v, a 10-watt bulb would only draw 0.083 amperes, compared to 0.33 A for a 40-watt bulb. Light-output-wise, they may not have the same ratio of light output. If a 40-watt lightbulb provides 400 lumens of light, a 10-watt lightbulb that is more energy-efficient than the 40-watt bulb may produce more than 100 lumens which is greater than 1/4 of the light output of the 40-watt bulb. A 10-watt bulb that is less energy-efficient than the same 40-watt bulb would produce less than 100 lumens of light.


An incandescent nightlight bulb is either 4 watt or 7 watt. A 4 watt bulb uses 1/25th (0.04) the power of a 100 watt bulb. A 7 watt bulb uses 7/100th (0.07) the power of a 100 watt bulb. There are LED and other types of nightlights that use much less power than this. To find the energy total used multiply the power (in watts) by the total time the light is on (in hours) to get energy (in Wh). If you want kWh divide this by 1000 as a watt is 1/1000th of a kW.


How much electricity is consumed depends only on the power Wattage of the light bulb. No matter what types of bulbs they are, a 100 Watt bulb will always consume more electricity than a 60 Watt bulb. The type of bulb makes no difference to how much electricity is consumed but does make a big difference to the amount of light that is produced. In general: * a 100 Watt halogen bulb will produce more light than a 100 Watt normal incandescent light bulb; * a 20 Watt compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulb will produce about the same amount of light as a 100 Watt incandescent light bulb.


A 250 watt light bulb takes 250 watts of power. The energy it uses (that you pay for) is measured in watt-hours or kilowatt-hours. A 250-watt bulb running for 4 hours uses 1 kilowatt-hour.


It depends on the type of bulb. Incandescent bulbs convert about 90% of the energy into heat and and only 10% is put off as light. LEDs, for instance, are much more efficient, converting almost 90% of the input energy to light. So, a 5 watt LED will convert about 4.5 watts to light, while a 25 watt incandescent will only convert 2.5 watts into light.



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