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If someone dented your car in a parking lot then left would your uninsured motorist insurance cover the damages?

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2007-08-15 11:18:41
2007-08-15 11:18:41

no, uninsured motorist coverage is for injuries only when an uninsured motorist hurts the occupants of a vehicle......there is a coverage called uninsured motorist property damage, (most people do not have this and are even unaware that it is available, and is not available in all state) if you have that or collision coverage those will cover the damage to your vehicle ........

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It depends on what sort of coverage you have on the vehicle. If you are fully insured, then the insurance will pay the damages minus your deductible. If not, you are on your own and will have to try to get the other party to pay for the damages. If your insurance pays, you can still sue the other party for the amount of your deductible.

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You would need to have Collision and or Uninsured Motorist Property Damage coverage for the vehicle in order for the insurance company to pay. You may also have to make a report to the business that owns and maintains the parking lot.

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You didn't complete your question so I will try to answer it as best I can. Any policy no matter what company it is will be the same if you have the same coverage. If the other party had no insurance on the vehicle then your uninsured motorist coverage will pay for your damage just as if they had coverage up to you limit of UM coverage. If the other person was using someone else's car and the car owner had coverage then his insurance will pay for the damages. Liability coverage follows the car generally. If your UM coverage has to pay for the damages, they will go after the car owner and the driver for reimbursement of the loss.

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The way you are describing it B is at fault. If B is at fault and has no insurance, A's uninsured motorist coverage will take over as if the person had coverage. Any amount paid out will be retrievable by the insurance company through suit or other means. You subrogate your loss to your insurance company so that they can go after the other party for damages paid.

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Probably not as the vehicle should not have been on the road at the time and you may get charged for driving without insurance. If it was in a parking lot you may be able to sue them in court to get your damages covered.

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Uninsured motorists coverage if you picked it up when you puchased your auto insurance would pay for a hit and run loss.

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The insurance company is not liable for paying damages. The minor was knowingly breaking the law by driving w/o a license. The parent of the child will be held liable for damages. As will the person/owner of the vehicle if they knew the minor was not a legally licensed driver. If you let an un liscensed/uninsured minor driver your vehicle, your asking for it. If you werent the parent of the minor, they could sue you as well for neglect.

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If you report the incident to your insurance company, and want them to cover the damages, it's more than likely they will consider it an 'at fault' accident, and it's possible your rates will increase, especially if it's not your first accident. The best way to avoid insurance rate increase in this situation is to pay for the damages yourself out of pocket, and not report it to your insurance company.

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They can sue you to have you pay for the damages, but they'd have to have proof or witnesses that you really did hit them. Either way, take it as a warning and get insurance. It wouldn't be fair if you were to cause an accident, even a minor one, and not being able to pay compensation to the ones involved.

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If the damage happened on their parking lot I would hold them responsible. Otherwise your own insurance will need to deal with it.

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No, parking tickets do NOT affect your car insurance rate.

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No, an insurance company does not get notified of a parking tickets. Insurance companies are only liable for handling accidents.

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Responsibility for Hit and Run DamageThe driver and the owner of the vehicle being driven are both jointly and separately responsible (liable) for the damage caused. Since it was a hit and run, I assume no coverage on their part. If you have Full coverage Insurance or at least uninsured motorists, then your policy will cover the loss. A police report is recommended.If you have uninsured motorist coverage included on your policy, it should cover this damage. It could depend upon on policy language and state law, your collision coverage will also cover your damages minus any applicable deductible. If covered through the uninsured motorists portion of your policy, in most U.S. states there is no deductible on uninsured motorists claims but this may vary depending on your local regulations and the policy options you chose when you purchased your Automobile Insurance.Deductibleswhile you can choose varying amounts for your deductible, which will influence your premium amount, the amount you pay toward your damages due to an uninsured motorist does NOT change, allowing you to influence your premium amount. Additionally, because it was paid under Uninsured Motorist coverage, it will be clear to any potential NEW carrier, that this was NOT an at fault accident. And to further complicate matters, with some insurance carriers, you could possibly be required to identify the hit-run driver in order to trigger the UM coverage. (license plate, year/make/model/color, etc. You may not have to have name, rank, & serial number.).More Information:This is a good question, particularly since it's such a frustrating thing. The best way to look at it is this: Your deductible has nothing to do with liability. Rather, your deductible relates to the rates you pay for insurance, and how much of the damages you are willing to absorb out-of-pocket. Your insurance carrier considers your deductible the amount you agreed to pay in any accident, regardless of fault and assuming your carrier is paying for damages to your vehicle. For instance, say you're sitting at a red light, and a drunk driver comes up behind you and rear ends your vehicle. Obviously, you're not at-fault for that; however, if you choose to go through your own insurance, you'll still be required to pay your deductible when you have your vehicle repaired. Unfortunately, unlike an accident in which the other driver is known, your insurance company can't go after a hit-and-run driver (this is called "subrogation," which most insurance companies are happy to pursue when they can because they want their money back, too). So, unless your insurance policy waives deductibles for hit-and-run accidents (which is rare), you'll be paying.Be careful about reporting this if the damage is minimal. Someone dented my truck overnight in a parking lot. I reported it to my insurance company, the repair was $526. I paid the $500 deductible, and they paid the $26. About 4.5 years later, I'm shopping for new insurance, and the insurance companies are adding about $130/6-months because of that 'accident'.EXACTLY.. (referring to the last post).. I was in a hit and run, my car was totaled. My own insurance company paid me $5,196 for my dead Honda Civic (RIP). But the pay out was from my collision insurance. SO... that claims record shows up when I try to shop around to other insurance companies... even though my carrier (GEICO) coded the accident as me being NOT at fault... the other companies don't care! They see your claims history, and their risk algorithms return higher rates! It's crap!Again, this is inevitably an insurance adjuster ploy. The only legitimate reason for which an adjuster may ask for such information is when an insured damages their own car and claims that the cause was another car which forced them off the road but did not actually strike their vehicle. (known in the trade as a "phantom" driver claim).In the UK - the driver of the vehicle which causes the hit and run and in turn his motor insurance. If however the driver cannot be found or is uninsured when found the Motor Insurer Bureau will meet your claims for vehicle damage and injury compensation. see the related link entitled "hit and run accident" for more details on how to recover compensation in the UK.The question is, 'who's responsible for hit and run damage?', The 'runner' would be responsible of course, but if they 'ran' chances are they may not be caught and thus made responsible for their actions. Hopefully the victim got a license plate (if that were possible and not just hit while parked and no one around to witness this accident) and this can be traced either thru their local law enforcement agency or their states DMV.If you have collision coverage you can file the claim, and have your vehicle repaired (subject to your deductible) your company will attempt to subrogate the guilty party, recouping your deductible and their payout (if information on fleeing vehicle is available).You do not say which state you are in, so I couldn't check that states requirements or coverage definitions directly, however I think it needs to be clarified that uninsured motorist coverage (in all but very few states that mandate UM also includes UMPD), will ONLY cover injuries and costs associated with the injury caused by a negligent uninsured driver. Uninsured motorist property damage coverage, is NOT a required, but rather optional coverage that (unfortunately), most people neither know about or have. Will cover the physcial damage to your vehicle caused by a negligent uninsured driver subject to the deductible. Most people however would not see the necessity of carrying UMPD if they have collision coverage. There is no deductible for uninsured motorist coverage.I have been in the insurance industry for 11 years now in the state of VA. I am aware that coverages in each state are different but uninsured and under-insured motorist typically doe includes BI and PD. On an insurance policy the uninsured motorist bodily injury and property damage is written at the same limits as the liability coverage on the policy. Lower uninsured/under-insured coverages can be requested if a form is signed stating that the insured does not want the limits to match. Also, uninsured motorist does come with a deductible depending on your state so the above statement that uninsured motorist coverage does not have a deductible is false. Most uninsured motorist claims are subject to a $200 deductible. Be cautioned when filing a uninsured/under-insured motorist claim as you may see the insurance company pay out a small amount under this coverage and then pin the rest under collision. This is when it becomes a problem of proving fault. Whenever a claim is paid out under collision it is considered at fault and it is like pulling teeth to prove otherwise to an insurance company. Take it from me, I have a hit while parked and $300 was paid under uninsured/under-insured motorist and $1400 was paid under collision and every insurance company is listing this as a chargeable at fault claim which holds a surcharge for 3 years on an insurance policy.Another view: At least in the US, "hit and run" is a term typically used in property damage claims. Further, it is use in the context of an individuals car being hit by an unknown person and the latter leaving the scene after causing the damage. The victim's car may have been occupied or not.If the victim is insured, he/she should be sure to get a police report to document the occurrence. Since such reports are made after the (the officer did not see the occurrence), the report serves the purpose of documenting the occurrence for later action. If the victim had physical damage coverage on the vehicle, this will be just about the only was to give any credence to the claim. All other things being equal, the insurer should pay for the reasonable cost of repair subject to the terms of the policy.If the vehicle that was hit was occupied and the occupant(s) sustained compensable injuries under the law of the jurisdiction, they may be entitled to recover under the uninsured motorist coverage of the policy. In such a case, they would have to prove the "value" of their injury in much the same way that they would in a third-party claim. Again, it is important that the occurrence be documented, including by a timely police report.

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form_title=Parking Lot Insurance form_header=Parking lots present a number of hazards. Be prepared with an insurance plan that covers those unexpected incidents. Is this parking lot for a place of business?= () Yes () No Is your parking lot currently under surveilance or monitored by security?= () Yes () No What is the maximum vehicular capacity of your parking lot?=_ Do you currently contract the maintenance of your parking lot?= () Yes () No

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any structure with several separate units, primarily located along the highway, with individual or common parking space at which motorist may obtain lodging,and in some instances, meals

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Most insurance companies treat accidents in parking lots as 50-50. You will most likely be responsible for the damages to your car. Sorry.

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Is the parking space a rental parking space, or is it the parking space for your rental apartment/home? In the case of the former, you have the right to ask your landlord for a different parking space, especially if you're the one paying its rental. In the case of the latter, unless that parking space is assigned to you -- that which you may ask to change -- then you need to park somewhere else. But in neither case is the landlord responsible for any damages that occur to your vehicle. Your car insurance or renters insurance should take care of that problem, save any deductibles

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Actually, hitting a deer is generally covered by your comprehensive coverage, not collision. Comprehensive covers "acts of God," which include hitting animals because it was an act of God that the animal was there at that time. Reading your insurance policy will clarify exactly which kinds of claims are covered by which types of insurance. There are 3 catagories for car insurance: 1. Liability (covers you if you hit someone else) 2. Comprehensive (covers you if an uninsured driver hits you), and 3. Collision (covers you if you hit something -for instance, a deer-)

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Insurance comes in two basic types, damages that you cause to others and damages that others did not cause or will not pay for, meaning: Damages you cause to others is called a "liability" insurance policy. The insurance company will pay up to a preset maximum amount for any damages you might cause with your vehicle. Damages tht others did not cause or will not pay for is usually called "comprehensive", meaning that the insurance company will cover some of YOUR costs if your vehicle is damaged. Different types of coverage include: weather related, the other guy was a hit and left the scene, unattended vehicle damage where the other driver just left, damages to your vehicle caused by an uninsured motorist and damages to your vehicle because you did something wrong yourself, including a slide off because of icy weather. Other vehicle expenses include payments, maintenance, repairs, fuel and often parking. Maintenance and repairs are two separate categories because one is an expected expense and the other is not. You know that you need to routinely change oil, filters and lube the chassis, that you need to periodically replace tires and wiper blades, bulbs, batteries and other items that have a set life expectancy. Repairs, however, can be very expensive and unexpected. If something goes wrong with a radiator hose (another maintenance item) and you loose the engine coolant, the engine can get so hot that it can crack or warp the head. That can be several hundred dollars and up to a thousand or more, depending on the type of vehicle. Owning and operating a vehicle is not cheap.

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Yes, if you have this coverage on your policy it provides coverage for a hit and run situation as well as other cases. One note is that you need to make sure that you call the police and get them to make a report as soon as you notice the damage whether it is an accident or an incident in a parking lot.

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Same as if your not parallel parking. Whoever it was that hit the other car is liable for the damages and repairs.

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Generally parking violation will not effect your insurance. These are not considered moving violations and thererfore will not increase the premiums.

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You will have to file a claim on your own comprehensive auto Insurance. A property owners insurance will not cover damages to your vehicle unless you could prove willful negligence. This is because a property owner is not liable for an act of nature.

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NOAnother View: If the parking lot was manned by an attendant you MAY have a claim. If it was un-manned, probably not.


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