answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2008-08-12 02:51:55

the insurance of the person responsible for the accident

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Your Answer

Related Questions


This depends on the insurance policy. Usually your car is covered, no matter who is driving it. However, if you are driving a car and the owner doesn't have insurance, then your insurance would pay if you got in an accident.


The driver's insurance would then be considered "secondary," meaning if the owner of the auto didn't have insurance, then if the person driving the car had insurance, they would be liable.


You are responsible for the damage you cause in an accident, regardless if you are insured or not. Having insurance transfers your responsibility to pay for the damage from you to your insurance company. If there are injuries to the other party, then the other party's insurance should pay for their injuries, but you are still responsible for the property damage you have caused the other person.


In order to make an accident insurance claim, one must provide the details of the accident and, if relevant, who was involved. The date and time of the accident and the extent of the damage are also necessary.




You insure a car for a person or persons, so that in the event of a accident with that car, insurance can be claimed only if a named driver on the insurance was driving at that time.


The insurance company is not going to force anyone to pay for damages to a car. The person that was driving the car and or the owner of that car that caused the accident is liable for the damages to the other vehicles involved in the accident. If there is insurance coverage for that damage then the insurance company will pay. However if the driver of the at fault vehicle is excluded from the insurance policy then the insurance company may be relieved from it's responsibility to pay on behalf of the owner of the vehicle.



The first time is one time too many. If you do not carry insurance, which is the law, then you should not be driving. Insurance covers the event of accident and protects those who might be in an accident with you.


Then you may be liable for any damage that you caused to someones property or person.


Yes, he is liable if the person driving has a fatal accident. His insurance allows him to cover people that drive his car with his permission. If that person wrecks his car and dies, the insurance would pay the funeral expenses and give the actual cash value for the car minus the deductible.



The owner of the car is responsible for the damages that car creates, regardless of who was driving. If there is a lawsuit, the insurance company is certainly going to enjoin the driver. And you need to read the insurance policy carefully to know whether they cover other drivers.


No, The at fault driver in the other vehicle is responsible for your losses. Not the person from who you borowed the car you were driving.



Assuming the woman is at fault and caused the accident, she is certainly responsible for the damage caused. Whether or not a person has insurance has no impact on liability and they are still legally required to compensate you for the damage. If she refuses to pay outright, you will have to take her to court in order to recover. That's the frustrating part when people don't carry insurance. In most states, drivers are required by law to carry liability insurance, so it is likely she was driving illegally. Whether a person has liability insurance or not has nothing to do with whether or not they are responsible for the damage they caused to another vehicle. If the other person is the one that was found to be the one that caused the damage, then they are liable for the damage, whether they have liability insurance or not.


There are no limits to insurance but there are MINIMUMS you must carry and they are: $15,000 for Bodily Injury Per Person $30,000 Maximum Total For Bodily Injury Accident Per Accident $5,000 Property Damage


Yes the insurance carrier of the person at fault will pay for the damages if they are in fact proved to be at fault. However you will be cited for driving without a license.


If you have full covered insurance YES. Otherwise it will only cover the other person. DUI accident its just like a regular accident, with the difference that you will go to jail.


The insurance for the vehicle you drove will be primary, your personal insurance will be secondary. Be honest and give them the info for the person who owns the car, and your personal insurance info.


By excluding a person from an auto insurance policy, you are stating that the "excluded" person will not drive the insured vehicle, and that you understand that the "excluded" person is not covered by your insurance in the case of any traffic violation (accident, ticket, etc.). It means there is no coverage available to the excluded person in the case of an accident while driving the said vehicle. There will be NO COVERAGE.


A bond is a promise to pay on your behalf if a condition occurs - such as failure to perform work by a deadline, or damage to property, etc. - with the understanding that the bonded person will pay the bond company back immediately. It is NOT insurance and does not have a cash value. two person vechal but insurance one person cmplitly accident and life cover furthar accident claim.


If you were involved in an accident with this person then their insurance information will be listed on the accident report. If you were not involved in an accident then it is not your business who they have insurance with. Much of this is covered by the privacy laws so if you really have to know ask the person.


Generally speaking, the person responsible for the accident is responsible for the damage. If the responsible person refuses to pay ot doesn't pay fast enough, the other can sue them if they wish.



Copyright ยฉ 2021 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.