Tanakh and Talmud

In Jewish tradition what is the purpose of the Psalms?

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2017-05-30 13:35:16
2017-05-30 13:35:16

The Psalms (Tehillim), which we might call the soul of the Jewish people, express the yearning of King David and of the entire nation to be close to God. They are one of the foundations of our prayerbook to this day.

Their purpose is:

To express love for God

To pray for everything

To pour out one's heart concerning worries, troubles, vicissitudes etc.

To express trust, hope and happiness

To sing to God in gratitude

To praise God's wisdom, kindness, power etc.

According to tradition, King David authored/compiled the book of Psalms and gave it to us in its present form. Seventy-three of the 150 bear his name, and tradition states that the unattributed ones are also from him (Talmud, Berakhot 9b).

Concerning those Psalms that have the names of other authors, tradition teaches that we may thank David for them too (Talmud, Bava Bathra 14b). This is because it was he who recorded them in their permanent form and in a single book. If not for King David, those Psalms would have gone lost.

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2015-03-16 18:07:42
2015-03-16 18:07:42

The Psalms (Tehillim), which we might call the soul of the Jewish people, express the yearning of King David and of the entire nation to be close to God. They are one of the foundations of our prayerbook to this day.

Their purpose is:

To express love for God

To pray for everything

To pour out one's heart concerning worries, troubles, vicissitudes etc.

To express trust, hope and happiness

To sing to God in gratitude

To praise God's wisdom, kindness, power etc.


According to tradition, King David authored/compiled the book of Psalms and gave it to us in its present form. Seventy-three of the 150 bear his name, and tradition states that the unattributed ones are also from him (Talmud, Berakhot 9b).

Concerning those Psalms that have the names of other authors, tradition teaches that we may thank David for them too (Talmud, Bava Bathra 14b). This is because it was he who recorded them in their permanent form and in a single book. If not for King David, those Psalms would have gone lost.

See also the Related Links.

Link: About King David

Link: Psalm 23

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Related Questions


Jewish tradition states that all Psalms whose source is not named, were penned by King David.


A:Tradition attributes many of the Psalms to King David, although biblical scholars say he was quite unlikely to have contributed to any of the Psalms. In any case, Psalm 100 is not one of the Psalms said to have been written by David.Jewish answer:Jewish tradition is that all of the unnamed Psalms were authored by King David. Even Psalms with other authors are attributed to him, since he incorporated them into the canon of prayers and praises; otherwise they would likely have been lost.Psalms 100 is a Psalm of praise, which is what King David had in mind as its purpose. It was to be recited when ascending to the Holy Temple.


according to Jewish tradition, the book of Tehillim (Psalms) was written by King David in the middle of the 9th century BCE.


Jewish tradition posits that the Psalms are the work of David.


Psalm 90Jewish answerTradition states that Adam composed Psalms 92 and 139, so they are the oldest.


King David is named as the author in 73 of the 150 Psalms. According to Jewish tradition, he also authored all of the Psalms that have no author named in them, except for eleven which tradition ascribes to Moses (who is named only once). This brings David's total to 113 of the 150. However, it was he who collated all of the Psalms and in whose merit they never went lost.


Saul, The king of the Israelites before king david.Jewish answer:Saul wrote none of the Psalms.King David collated the pre-existing and contemporary Psalms of others (such as Eitan), and authored most of them himself. Our tradition states that all of the unattributed Psalms are from King David.


Yes.Tradition states that King David gave us the Book of Psalms. Seventy-three of the 150 bear his name, and the unattributed ones are also from him (Talmud, Berakhot 9b).Concerning those Psalms that have the names of other authors, tradition teaches that we may thank David for them too (Talmud, Bava Bathra 14b). This is because it was he who recorded them in their permanent form and in a single book. If not for King David, those Psalms would have gone lost.See also:About King DavidPsalm 23The purpose of the Psalms


The purpose of life in Jewish tradition is to serve God, to keep the Torah; and to pass the spiritual tests which are sent our way, by utilizing our free-will properly.


The tradition is that all of the unnamed Psalms were written by King David.


Jewish tradition holds that all 150 psalms were written by King David. Many modern scholars see them as the product of several authors or groups of authors, many unknown.


All of the unattributed Psalms were authored by King David, according to tradition.


According to tradition, eleven Psalms (90-100) are attributed to Moses.


Psalms (Tehillim), and The Siddur (Jewish prayerbook).


The Psalms are not located in the Torah, they are found in the K'tuvim section of the Tanach (Jewish Bible).



Jewish tradition was preserved by the Jewish Prophets, Sages, Torah-commentators and codifiers. Jewish tradition is preserved by learning and keeping the Torah.


According to tradition, Psalms 90-100 were all composed by Moses.


The Psalms of the Bible were written in Hebrew.To see the Psalms in their original language, click here.


Psalms of David is a section in The Book of Psalms. Typically it's simply referred to as Psalms. Psalms is a section of the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible. Psalms is a key section of the Old Testament for the Jewish faith.


According to tradition, King David gave us the Book of Psalms. Seventy-three of the 150 bear his name, and the unattributed ones are also from him (Talmud, Berakhot 9b).Concerning those Psalms that have the names of other authors, tradition teaches that we may thank David for them too (Talmud, Bava Bathra 14b). This is because it was he who recorded them in their permanent form and in a single book. If not for King David, those Psalms would have gone lost.See also:About King DavidPsalm 23The purpose of the Psalms


David of Mesopotamia is very important to Jewish, Christian, and Islamic culture. In the bible, he is the king of the Israelites and Jewish people. According to biblical tradition, his decent is Messiah. In Islam he is considered to be a prophet and king of the nation. In the Book of Psalms he is famous for some of the Psalms written. As king, David formed the kingdom of Israel by uniting the Hebrew tribes.


Psalms were written for the purpose of being sung. They naturally lend themselves to singing.


Harry Peter Nasuti has written: 'Tradition history and the Psalms of Asaph' -- subject(s): Bible, Criticism, interpretation 'TRADITION HISTORY AND THE PSALMS OF ASAPH (ISRAEL)'


Jewish people's tradition is Hanukkah



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