answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2012-07-19 21:02:10
2012-07-19 21:02:10

If it is a force (i.e. there are people on all the bases behind the runner) play, then yes, the baseman needs to touch the base to get the runner out.

If the runner is not required to move to that base, then the baseman must tag the runner to get him out.

The baseman does not NEED to touch the base to record the out. The defense may tag the runner OR the bag.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


There are two situations when a baseman can tag the base for an out.The first is the force out. A force out happens when a baseman tags the base of the only possible location for the runner. For example, if a batter hits a ground ball to the first baseman, the first baseman only needs to tag first base because it is the runner's only possible destination. Also, if there was a runner on first base and a ground ball was hit, there would be a force out at both second and first base because they runner on first base would be forced to progress one base. With a man on first and second base, you can force at first, second and third, and with the bases loaded, there is a force at every base. If there is a runner on second and/or third, but not first, the runners are not required to progress one base, so there is only a force at first.The second is on the fly ball. If a fly ball is caught, a base runner must touch the base again ("tag up") before moving on to the next base. If they do not tag up after the ball is caught, the baseman at the base from which they left can tag that base for the out. For example, if there is a runner on first base and the batter hits a fly ball, and that ball is caught, the runner must touch the base after the ball is caught before he can leave for the next base. If he doesn't touch the base after the ball is caught, the baseman only need tag the base while holding the ball for the out.


yes the batter must touch the base or he will called out


No, if there is a runner on first and the second baseman fields the ball and throws it to the shortstop, who muffs the play and allows both the runner and batter to advance/reach safely, the play would be ruled a fielder's choice and an error. It would still count as an at-bat and a non-hit for the batter, just as if the second-baseman had muffed the throw to the first-baseman with nobody on base.


The pitcher and maybe the first baseman, if there is no need for anyone to cover first base and no need for him to cut a throw from the outfield.


You don't. A force means no tag is needed, only the baseman needs to catch the ball and have one foot on the base. The runner is forced; he or she has no safe base to return to and is therefore automatically out.


No. But this rule does not come into effect until AFTER the force out at first base occurs. In other words, until that force out at first happens, the runner who was on first must advance. But AFTER the force out occurs, the runner who was on first need not do so. If a first baseman steps on first and then immediately fires to second base, the person covering second base must tag out the runner coming towards second base. I've seen twenty-year veterans of MLB forget this -- they take the throw from the first baseman after a force out at first base, step on second base, and then walk away without tagging the runner.


Actually there is no rule in the Major League Rules that the runner has to touch base after each pitch. He must after a foul ball or caught fly ball. Even though runners in almost all leagues do touch after each pitch including the major's it is not a rule in Official Rules: 7.00 The Runner that he must: (See related Link)


The official rules state that a fielder need only hold a ball in his hand and touch a base. If the runner is forced to that base and the fielder touches the base while he is holding the ball, he is out. It does not say he has to step on the base. It just says he has to touch it. The runner, on the other hand, must be tagged with the hand that holds the ball.


no, you can tag the runner to get him out or on a play where the runner is forced to run you can step on the base he is running to.


Not always. If a fielder is in possession of the ball AND in physical contact to a base that a base runner must run, then that base runner is out.


The first baseman should stay close to the bag but out a little more then usual so incase she needs to run back to the bag to get an out if the ball in thrown in her derection to get an out. The second baseman shouldcome up from her position too. More then the first baseman should because if there's just a runner on first and a batter then there is no need for a second bas out. The short-stop should come up more as well. I the ball comes to her she can either get the out at first or at home or if the runner goes for home but decides to go back then she can get the runner out at third base. The third baseman should go up but still stay by her bag more like the first basemen. She should be ready for the throw to home or an out at third if the girl changes her mind about coming back from home to third. Stay close to the bag but out too so it will be easier to throw the third base runner out at home so the other team won't score.


This is not a force play, so the runner would have to be tagged to be Out.


When proceeding to first a runner can not retreat towards home nor can they come to a complete stop of forward motion. If they do either of these the the runner is to be called out without need of a tag on the runner or the base. This only applies to a runner between home and first.


Any time a ball is caught by a fielder prior to the ball hitting the ground, with that catch not being the third out, any base runner can IN THEORY advance to the next base after the catch is made. However, if the fielder throws the ball to the base the runner is trying to get to, and the runner is tagged before reaching that base, that runner is also out. Thus, in a practical sense, the ball needs to be hit sufficiently far that the fielder, after catching the ball, could not throw the ball to the base, the runner would try to advance to, before the runner actually got to that base. That distance depends on how well the fielder can throw the ball and how fast the runner can get to the next base.


Yes, in Major League Baseball, all players need to advance to their next base with the bases loaded and the batter being hit regardless of the runner that is on third base being the winning run and therefore being the ending of the current game that's being played.


If the defense throws it to first and the umpire makes the call, the runner is out, but if the ump does not make the call an appeal must be made to determine the situation of the runner.


==Cheer the fielder first and don't forget the first baseman == Even a routine grounder must be fielded and thrown to the first baseman before an out is recorded. There is really no need to cheer for the runner. More than a few routine ground balls are not fielded properly. Remember the famous Billy Buckner/Mookie Wilson play which many believe cost the Red Sox a World Series title. Position players mentioned in this question must function together - team work -for an out to occur.


Yes, when a hitter fouls a pitched ball, any runner on base is to return to their base without risk of being thrown or tagged out. Often, the runner will put their head down or look in the stands as they return to their base because there is no need to be wary of getting out.


the only way for them to get out is if there tagged so yes


Yes, because the hitter is running to first base. If you are still there, you'll both be on a base. That means you are both out. Both runner and batter are not out. The fielder will need to tag either 2nd base for the force out or tag both players occupying 1st. If both players are occupying 1st and both are tagged while standing on first the runner that should have gone to 2nd will be out.


Regardless of the situation, if the ball is hit on the ground to the right side of the infield the pitcher's duty is to run to first base and be ready to take a throw. In this situation, there are two possible actions the first baseman could take ... 1) Throw the ball to second base in an attempt to start a double play. If this is the case, the first baseman will need to turn his body towards second base to throw. This means it will take him longer to get back to first base to take the return throw. If the pitcher is hustling towards first base chances are he will get there before the first baseman will. 2) Throw the ball home in an attempt to start a double play but at least to get the lead runner and stop a run from scoring. In this case, the first baseman will turn his body towards home plate to make the throw. He may be able to get back to first base in time to take the return throw and if he can, he will yell to the pitcher that he is going to take the throw from the catcher. In this case, it is usually easier for the first basemen to take the throw as the pitcher's momentum takes him away from the throw and he will have to turn his body when he gets to first base to face the catcher. Of course, all this depends on where the first baseman fields the ball. If he fields it very close to first base, he will cover for the return throw regardless of whether he throws to second or throws home.


That would depends on where they field the ball. Howeverthe distance from the 3rd base bag and the 1st base bag is just under 85 feet.


A baserunner on 1st is not forced unless the batter hits a ground ball, a base hit on a fielding error (he is also forced to advance on a walk, hit batter, catcher interference, etc.). The runner is not forced on a fly ball unless it is dropped or falls in for a hit. If a fly ball is caught, the runner is not forced, but may choose to "tag up" and try to advance to 2nd after the catch. If a fly ball is dropped, the runner need not tag up before advancing to 2nd. THEY CAN RISK IT...BUT IF THE BALL IS CAUGHT HE HAS TO GET BACK TO FIRST BASE.....OR IT WILL BE A DOUBLE PLAY....BUT THEY DONT HAVE TO TAG UP Just to clarify. If a fly ball is caught, the runner on 1st may try to advance, but to do so, he must be on 1st base, or return and touch 1st base, before attempting to advance. The "tag up" must take place after the ball is caught by the fielder.


You need to retouch your base when: * A ball is caught on a fly. You can touch the base (this is called "tagging up") and then run to the next one. If however a fielder with the ball touches the base you touched it, you're out. * A foul ball, or an otherwise dead ball (such as following a time out).


Right fielders ordinarily have better arms because they are in the farthest position from 3rd base. If a ball is hit far out to left field, the runner is often let have 1st base. Right fielders need a rocket of an arm in order to stop the runner from getting on 3rd base, or rounding 3rd to home



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.