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2013-07-18 01:40:07
2013-07-18 01:40:07

Yes, the word dogs' is the possessive form for the plural noun dogs.

Example: The dogs' park is centrally located in the subdivision.

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The possessive form of the plural noun dogs is dogs'.The dogs stay:in a dogs' kennelin the dogs' housesin the dogs' owners' housesin the dogs' cages at the pet shop


The possessive form for the plural noun dogs is dogs'.Example: All of the dogs' collars have a tag imprinted with their name.


The noun dog's is the singular possessive form (one dog, one collar).The plural possessive form is dogs' (The dogs' leather collars).



The plural form of the noun dog is dogs.The plural possessive form is dogs'.Example: All of the dogs' collars have a tag imprinted with their name.


The possessive form for the plural noun dogs is dogs'.Example: All of the dogs' collars have a tag imprinted with their name.English plural nouns ending in s form the possessive by adding an apostrophe (') after the ending s.


The possessive noun in the sentence is in the incorrect form.The correct possessive form for 'the toy of the dog' is 'the dog's toy'.


dogs' would be correct BOUNS= copy any of these faces to have fun talking with other people when useing them ☜(゚ヮ゚☜) (☞゚ヮ゚)☞ ༼ つ ◕◕ ༽つ (⓿⓿)


The possessive form of the singular noun huntsman is huntsman's.example: The huntsman's dogs disappeared into the woods.


The plural form for the noun dog is dogs; the plural possessive form is dogs'.


The plural form for dog is dogs. The word dogs' is plural possessive; the apostrophe shows possession, something belongs to the dogs.


Dogs do this to make them feel and be more dominant. Some dogs are also possessive and they want to be protective if their owner or territory.


spell it dog's. This means the collar belongs to the dog. (one dog possessive) dogs' - The dogs' owner took them to the park. (more than one dog possessive). If your original sentence was about more than one dog then you would write it like this: The dogs' collars are red.


No. Dogs is a plural noun. It can be used as a possessive adjective (dogs' homes) and the singular, dog, is often used as a noun adjunct (dog breath).


If you mean something belonging to one dog, as in "the dog's mouth", like that. If you mean something belonging to two or more dogs, as in "All dogs' mouths", like that.


The possessive adjective "its" would have the plural "their" or "theirs". Neither uses an apostrophe. Example : "The cat ate its food. The dogs ate their food." Example: "The car was theirs."


If you're talking about the Kraftmaid brand of cabinetry, it would be Kraftmaid's for the possessive -- since there is only one Kraftmaid brand. ('s shows posession by a singular thing; s' shows possession by more than one thing. For example, if one dog has a bone, the possessive is "dog's bone." If multiple dogs share one bone it's "dogs' bone." And if multiple dogs have many bones, its "dogs' bones." The exception is if the plural is already built into the word that describes the owner -- for example, men or women. The proper plural possessive is "men's shoes" or "women's dresses." )


If you want a plural, no. Correct:bear, bearscat, catscheetah, cheetahdog, dogselephant, elephantsetc.If you need a possessive, yes it needs an apostrophe. Correct:The bear's claws are large. (singular possessive) The bears' habitat is the forest. (plural possessive)The cat's whiskers are white. (singular possessive) The cats' cages need cleaned. (plural possessive)We can see the cheetah's leg is hurt. (singular possessive) The cheetahs' coats are beautiful. (plural possessive)etc.


It depends. The plural form of dog is dogs but the possessive form of dog is dog's IE: Two dogs are sitting on the porch. The dog's food dish is empty.


When wanting to make a noun possessive, the apostrophe (') is used to show ownership, possession, origin, or purpose.For example"The dog's dinner looked disgusting in its bowl." (singular possessive)or"The dogs' dinners looked disgusting in their bowls." (plural possessive)


Him is not possessive. The possessive would be 'his'.


No, he is not possessive. The possessive form would be his.


The singular possessive form is tent's; the plural possessive form is tents'.


It depends on how the word 'boys' is used. If it is a plural noun, then no. The boys chased the dog. If is is a singular possessive noun, then yes. The boy's dog chased him. If it is a plural possessive noun, then yes. The boys' dogs chased them.


Dogs bury....their nose in their owner's crook of elbowtheir nose in their owner's handtheir nose under their pawsbones in the yardtoys in the yardthings they feel possessive of and want to hide.



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