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Is the beneficiary of an estate responsible for the deceased debts?

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2012-02-25 17:25:42
2012-02-25 17:25:42

Debts are the responsibility of the estate. No will is necessary to open an estate. Before anything in the estate can be distributed, the debts have to be cleared.

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Related Questions


In Kentucky the estate of the deceased is primarily responsible for the debts. Indirectly, the spouse is going to pay the debts, either by a smaller inheritance or as a beneficiary of the goods and services purchased by the spouse.


Indirectly, the spouse is going to pay the debts, either by a smaller inheritance or as a beneficiary of the goods and services purchased by the spouse. The estate of the deceased is responsible for the debts.


No a beneficiary is not responsible. One of the primary reasons to open an estate is to resolve such debts. The estate has to pay off the debts. If the estate cannot do so, they distribute as best they can. If the court approves the distribution, the debts are ended.


The estate of the deceased is responsible for the debt.


Technically the estate is responsible for all the debts of the deceased. The spouse, through the estate, has to pay off the debts.


The estate of the deceased is responsible for the debts. Indirectly, the spouse is going to pay the debts, either by a smaller inheritance or as a beneficiary of the goods and services purchased by the spouse.


Indirectly. The estate of the deceased husband is responsible for resolving all of his debts. Since the widow is going to be the primary beneficiary of the estate, she will inherit less because the estate has to pay the debt.


The estate is responsible for the debts of the deceased. That means before the estate can be settled, all debts have to be cleared. If there is not enough in the estate to cover them, there are some people who will not get paid.


The estate is responsible for all the debts of the deceased. That means before the estate can be settled, all debts have to be cleared. If there is not enough in the estate to cover them, there are some people who will not get paid.


A beneficiary cannot be made responsible. However, they may not get anything from the estate, because it is responsible for ending all debts.


The estate of the deceased is responsible for the debts. Your mother will indirectly have to resolve the debts before the assets are released.


No. All monies of a deceased is gathered in to their estate, then all debts of the deceased are paid, then legacies are paid out. Policies payable to a person are payable to that person.


The deceased estate is responsible for repayment of debt, with secured debts taking priority. With the exeption of property which is ruled exempt to probate procedures, assets will not be distributed to named heirs until debts are satisfied.


No. The decedent's estate is responsible for paying the debts of the decedent. Generally, an annuity with a named beneficiary is not part of the probate assets much like life insurance payable to a named beneficiary. However, the recipient of an annuity should consult a professional regarding tax issues.


The estate of the deceased is responsible for resolving the debts left behind. This is the reason that an estate is a good idea, it provides a means to settle the debts.


The estate of the deceased is responsible in Florida. The executor is responsible for listing all assets and debts. The debts are paid and anything left is distributed.


The estate is responsible for the debts of the deceased. The executor is not personally responsible for them.


The debts of the deceased are the responsibility of the estate. The estate will resolve the debts before you get any money. Consult a probate attorney in your jurisdiction for help.


The estate of the deceased is responsible for all debts after the person dies.


Generally, the estate is responsible for paying the debts of the decedent when the debts are in the sole name of the decedent. If there are no assets then the creditors are out of luck.


The estate is responsible for the debts. If the estate has no assets, the creditors will not get paid. If there are not enough assets to pay the debts, the beneficiaries will not receive anything.


The estate of the deceased is responsible for paying all the deceased's lawful debts.


In Florida the estate of the deceased is going to be responsible for the debts. Indirectly, the spouse is going to pay the debts, either by a smaller inheritance or as a beneficiary of the goods and services purchased by the spouse.


No, if they were not joint debtor's with the deceased they are not responsible for any of his or her debts.


Generally the decedent's estate is responsible for the debts.



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