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2014-05-20 16:46:25
2014-05-20 16:46:25

Yes, molarity is (number of moles/liters of solution). If you increase the numerator, the molarity number will be greater.

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Related Questions


If it is water moving from a higher concentration to a lower concentration, the diffusion is called osmosis.


Yes, concentration or molarity is a factor in the rate of a reaction in solution. Higher concentration means a faster reaction, lower reaction means a slower reaction.


During the process of diffusion, solute moves from a higher concentration to a lower concentration.


Diffusion is the movement of particles from a region of higher concentration to a region of lower concentration. Osmosis is the diffusion of water molecules (only) from an area of higher concentration to an area of low concentration.


These two variables have an inverse relationship. That is, the higher the solvent concentration, the lower the solute concentration. Similarly, the lower the solvent concentration, the higher the solute concentration.


why molarity is preferred over molarity in expressing the concentration of a solution


Diffusion is the movement of particles down a concentration gradient (from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration).


Molarity is a measure of concentration in SI.


Molarity is an indication for concentration.


the higher the concentration of acid or H+, the lower the pH the higher the concentration of base or OH-, the higher the pH


molecules move from higher concentration to lower concentration.....the answer is concentration


When there is a higher concentration of water on one side and a lower concentration on the other side, the water on the side with the higher concentration will naturally move to the side with the lower concentration in order to balance the two sides.


The diffusion of water across a selective membrane is affected by solute concentration. Water will always try to balance the molarity of the two or more compartments. It achieves this by diffusing from the lower solute concentration to the higher solute concentration.


the movement of any substance from a higher concentration to a lower concentration.


Molecues move by diffusion from a region of their Higherconcentration to a reigon of their lower concentration, down their concentration gradient.


osmosis is the passive movement of a substance from a place where its concentration is higher, to another where its concentration is lower. This applies to gases, I guess


The movement of water from a high concentration to a lower concentration with no membrane involved is simple diffusion.


Diffusion -Movement of molecules(not water) from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentrationOsmosis -Movement of water molecules from a region of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration through a semi permeable membrane.Similarities- both move from higher to lower concentration and both are examples of passive transport


estimation by comparison of higher concentration and lower concentration


When molecules move from a higher concentration to a lower concentration.


higher concentration to a area of lower concentration


The one with the higher molarity (# of moles/Liter) which is equivalent to concentration.


Diffusion. If this happens to a water molecule, it is called osmosis. Moving from lower to higher concentration requires active transport.


In a nutshell, yes. The water will go from a higher concentration to a lower concentration to increase the entropy of the lower concentration area. The increase in entropy of the lower concentration area would be greater than the loss of entropy of the higher concentration giving you a NET increase in total entropy.


Molarity has to deal with the concentration of solute in a concentration, and Moles per liter of the solvent is the concentration of solvent.



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