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Answered 2014-11-24 02:50:05

No. Trying can be a noun (gerund), a verb, or an adjective.

It is the present participle of the verb to try.

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Yes, it is an adverb. It means in a halfhearted way: in a manner that is not actually trying much.


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Is different an abstract noun?

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