Pronouns

Is whose a noun?

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2012-03-05 18:35:30
2012-03-05 18:35:30

No, whose is a pronoun, a word that takes the place of a noun. The word whose is an interrogative pronoun that asks a question, and a relative pronoun that introduces a relative clause. For example:

Interrogative: Whose car is parked next to the hydrant?

Relative (and possessive): The blue car, whose windshield has the ticket, is your car!

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The noun 'widow' is a word for a female whose husband has died.The noun 'widower' is a word for a male whose wife has died.


The noun 'widow' is a gender specific noun for a femalewhose spouse has died.The corresponding gender specific noun for a male is widower.


The word 'whose' is both an adjective and a pronoun.The adjective 'whose' is an interrogative adjective, a word that introduces a question.The pronoun 'whose' is an interrogative pronoun and a relative pronoun.The interrogative pronoun also introduces a question.The distinction between the interrogative adjective and the interrogative pronoun is that the interrogative adjective is placed before a noun to describe that noun. The interrogative pronoun takes the place of a noun.Examples:Whose car is in the driveway? (adjective, describes the noun 'car')Whose is the car in the driveway? (pronoun, takes the place of the noun that answers the question)The relative pronoun 'whose' introduces a relative clause, a group of words that gives information about its antecedent.Example: The person whose car is in the driveway is my brother.


The word 'whose' is both an adjective and a pronoun.The adjective 'whose' is an interrogative adjective, a word that introduces a question.The pronoun 'whose' is an interrogative pronoun and a relative pronoun.The interrogative pronoun also introduces a question.The distinction between the interrogative adjective and the interrogative pronoun is that the interrogative adjective is placed before a noun to describe that noun. The interrogative pronoun takes the place of a noun.Examples:Whose car is in the driveway? (adjective, describes the noun 'car')Whose is the car in the driveway? (pronoun, takes the place of the noun that answers the question)The relative pronoun 'whose' introduces a relative clause, a group of words that gives information about its antecedent.Example: The person whose car is in the driveway is my brother.


No, whose is a pronoun, a word that takes the place of a noun. The word whose is an interrogative pronoun that asks a question, and a relative pronoun that introduces a relative clause. For example:Interrogative: Whose car is parked next to the hydrant?Relative (and possessive): The blue car, whose windshield has the ticket, is your car!Whose introduces the relative clause 'whose windshield has the ticket'.


The word 'whose' is not a noun.The word 'whose' is a pronoun, a word that takes the place of a noun in a sentence.The pronoun 'whose' is a possessive interrogative pronoun, a word that introduces a question. The pronoun 'whose' takes the place of the noun that answers the question.The pronoun 'whose' is a possessive relative pronoun, a word that introduces a relative clause, a group of words that gives information about its antecedent.Example functions:Whose bicycle are you riding? I borrowed the bicycle from Sam.interrogative pronoun, the bicycle belonging to SamThe man whose mailbox I hit was very nice about it. relative pronoun, the mailbox belonging to the man


Who is referring to a person and whose is referring to the possessive person aka the person who owns the noun


The word, geologist, derives from the central noun, geology. However, the word, geologist is a noun as it the person whose occupation is geology.


Yes, the word logger is a noun, a singular, common noun, a person whose profession is logging, also called a lumberjack.


Used with a person followed by a noun and than a verb


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The word carnivore is a noun, a word for an animal whose diet consists of flesh; a word for a thing.The adjective form of the noun 'carnivore' is carnivorous.


Yes, the word choreographer is a noun, a singular, common, abstract noun; a word for someone whose job is to plan the movements that dancers perform on stage.


The word 'accountant' is a noun, a singular, common noun; a word for someone whose job is to prepare and maintain financial records; a word for a person.


Yes, the noun 'bricklayer' is a common noun, a general word for a person whose profession is to build with bricks; a word for any bricklayer anywhere.


The noun 'housewife' is a common noun, a general word for any female spouse whose occupation is caring for her family and running the household.


One who has been converted is called a convert, a noun. A convert is a person whose belief or opinion has been changed.


No. "It" is a pronoun, representing a noun whose gender is irrelevant or nonexistent.


No, the word 'whose' is not a noun.The word 'whose' is a pronoun, the possessive form of the pronoun 'who'.The pronoun 'whose' takes the place of a noun for a person as an interrogative pronoun and a relative pronoun.An interrogative pronoun introduces a question. Examples:Who is the new math teacher? (the pronoun 'who' takes the place of the noun that answers the question)Whose math book can I borrow? (the pronoun 'whose' takes the place of the possessive noun, the answer to the question and the owner of the book)A relative pronoun introduces a relative clause. A relative clause is a group of words that gives information about the antecedent, it has a subject and a verb but isn't a complete sentence. Examples:Mr. Smith is the person who teach math now. (the relative clause gives more information about the antecedent 'person')Janet whose math book I borrowed was so kind. (The relative clause gives more information about the antecedent 'Janet')Possessive noun example:Whose book did I borrow? I borrowed Janet's book.


The noun scientist is a singular, common noun, a word for someone who is trained in science, especially someone whose job is to do scientific research; a word for a person.


The noun 'hanger' is a concrete noun, a word for a person whose job is to hang something; a word for a device used to hang clothing; a word for a physical person or thing.



Yes, the word 'dyer' is a noun, a word for someone whose profession is dying fabric or other materials; a word for a person.


The two words are closely related. "Judaism" is a noun whose meaning is "the Jewish religion." "Jewish" is an adjective whose meaning is "a person whose religion is Judaism." If you're Jewish, you practice Judaism.



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