Pronouns

Is whose possessive?

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2015-04-29 23:07:47
2015-04-29 23:07:47

Yes, the pronoun 'whose' is the possessive form interrogative and relative pronoun.

An interrogative pronoun introduces a question.

Example: Whose car is in our driveway?

A relative pronoun introduces a relative clause.

Example: The one whose car is in the drive is the contractor.

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Whose is indeed the possessive form of who.Who's is used as a contraction for who is or who has.


Possessive adjectives indicate belonging. The possessive adjectives are my, your, his, her, their, our, and whose.His bicycle is green.Whose car is that?


The word 'whose' is an interrogative pronoun and relative pronoun.The pronoun 'whose' is the possessive form for 'who' or 'which'.EXAMPLESinterrogative pronoun: Whose book did you borrow? (possessive of 'who')relative pronoun: The book whose cover is missing is mine. (possessive of 'which')


The possessive pronoun 'whose' asks a question. Example: Whose car is in the driveway? You saw whose boyfriend talking to her?


Whose is possessive, who is not. ex. Who did that? Whose rollerskates are these?


Whose is the possessive form of who. It means "belonging to whom." Who's is also a possessive form of who, but it is a contraction of "who is".The correct form is: Whose turn is it?


No. The word "whose" is a possessive form of the pronoun who. It is used as an adjective. (e.g. find out whose car was damaged)Note: the spelling who's is not a possessive - it is a contraction of 'who is'



No. Whose is a pronoun. It is the possessive pronoun and an interrogative pronoun (asks a question). Examples: Possessive: A boy, whose name I forget, gave me the directions. Interrogative: Whose car is parked in front of the house?


The possessive form of who is whose.


The contraction who's (who is) is pronounced the same as the possessive pronoun whose. Because who's has an apostrophe, it can be mistaken as a possessive form. But whose is used as an adjective, typically before nouns.


The possessive form of the pronoun "who" is "whose".Possessive forms of pronouns do not use an apostrophe, the pronoun itself is the possessive form.The pronoun "whose" functions as an interrogative and a relativepronoun.EXAMPLESWhose job is cleaning the lunchroom? (interrogative use, introduces a question)The one whose job it is to clean the lunchroom is posted on this schedule. (relative use, introduces a relative clause)


"whos" is not a word. "who's" and "whose" are homophones -- they sound identical. they are not homonyms, synonym, nor antonyms. "who's" is a contraction for "who is" or sometimes "who has" as in the examples "who's at my door?" and "who's eaten my cake?" "whose" is a possessive form of "who" -- "it was mark whose dog got into our garbage" or "whose dog is this in my garbage?" "who's" works similarly to "what's" in most sentences, one refering to people and the other to things. "whose" is the possessive of "who," just like "my" is the possessive of "i/me" and "your" is the possessive of "you."


The pronoun 'whose' used as an interrogative and possessive pronoun.


The possessive interrogative pronoun whose(whose woods) is not repeated.The words 'stopping by the woods on a snowy evening' is not a sentence, it is not a complete thought.


No. Who is a relative pronoun. The related possessive is whose.


The possessive form of the pronoun 'who' is whose.Example as interrogative pronoun:Who parked in our driveway?Whose car is in our driveway?Example as relative pronoun:The one who parked in our driveway is the contractor.The one whose car is in the driveway is the contractor.


Who is referring to a person and whose is referring to the possessive person aka the person who owns the noun


Yes, the pronoun 'whose' is the possessive form of 'who'.The pronouns 'who' and 'whose' are both interrogative pronouns and relative pronoun.Example as interrogative pronoun:Who parked in our driveway?Whose car is in our driveway?Example as relative pronoun:The one who parked in our driveway is the painter.The one whose car is in the driveway is the painter.


The spelling is WHOSE if you are using it as a possessive pronoun as in,"Whose book is this?"The spelling is WHO'S if you are using it to replace who is as in,"Who's going to help me?"


The pronoun 'who' can be singular or plural.Examples:Who is that man I saw you with?Who are those people picketing our shop?The possessive form of the pronoun 'who' is whose, also singular or plural.Examples:Whose car is blocking the driveway?Whose cars are blocking the street?


There are two types of pronouns that show possession:possessive pronouns, a word that takes the place of a noun that belongs to someone or something.The possessive pronouns are mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs. possessive adjectives, a word placed before a noun to describe that noun as belonging to someone or something.The possessive adjectives are my, our, your, his, her, its. Examples:John lost his math book, this book must be his. (possessive pronoun)John lost his math book, this must be his book. (possessive adjective)Another type of pronoun in the possessive case is whose.The pronoun 'whose' is an interrogative pronoun and a relative pronoun.Examples:Whose book is this? (interrogative pronoun)The book belongs to John whose book was lost. (relative pronoun)


No, it is not an adverb. It is a possessive pronoun (adjective/determiner) for the pronoun who.


The word "whose" is a possessive or interrogative pronoun. Instead of saying "Who owns this pencil?" you can say "Whose pencil is this?"Example sentences:"Whose trash is this on the table?""I talked to the boy whose bike had been stolen."Note:The apostrophe form "who's" is not the possessive, but rather a contraction for the phrase "who is."(See the Related link.)


Whose means of asking someone of whom it belong or who knows any information in which an apostrophe has to occur. Example: 'Whose is this keyring?' 'Whose relatives had a poodle?' ====================================== 'Whose' is the possessive form of the pronoun 'who.'



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