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What are the isotopes of gold?

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βˆ™ 2010-11-23 13:10:28

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Isotope, Half LifeAu-194, 1.6 days

Au-195, 186.1 days

Au-195m, 30.5 seconds

Au-196, 6.2 days

Au-197, Stable

Au-198, 2.7 days

Au-199, 3.14 days

2010-11-23 13:10:28
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Q: What are the isotopes of gold?
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Related Questions

Gold-184 and gold-186 are different of gold?

Gold-184 and Gold-186 are different ISOTOPES of gold?


What are the common isotopes in gold?

Gold has only one naturally occurring isotope: Gold-197. All other isotopes are synthetic and radioactive.


How many isotopes does gold have?

18!


How many radioactive isotopes does gold have?

2


Gold 184and gold 186 are different of gold?

They are differant isotopes of gold . In normal practical sense they are the same


Which element's isotopes name is based on its color?

gold


Are there important isotopes of the element gold?

Gold has only one naturally occurring isotope.


What are the most common isotopes of gold?

au-198 is an isotope of gold that is used to treat cancer.


Are gold atoms the same?

All gold atoms (excepting artificial isotopes) are similar.


How are gold 184 and gold 186 different?

Both are extremely radioactive isotopes. Gold 186 has 2 more neutrons.


How many unstable radioactive isotopes does gold have?

all but one.


Was gold obtained from mercury in Japan in 1924?

It can and it has been done but turning lead into gold costs more than buying the gold alone. You see? Lead has 82 isotopes and gold has 79. So lead is 3 isotopes away to be converted into gold. But it cost less buying it as it comes from earth.


Is gold radioactive?

None of the gold ordinarily found in nature is radioactive. Like all elements, there are synthetic radioactive isotopes of gold.


Is there 118 neutrons in gold?

On average, most gold atoms have about 118 neutrons. Some gold atoms have more and some have less, these are called isotopes of gold.


Why can scientists make technetium synthetically but not gold?

You might get gold but these obtained isotopes are radioactive and unstable; so it is useless.


Gold 184 and gold 186 are different of gold?

They are a couple of different radioactive isotopes of gold. Gold 184 has a half-life of about 15.5 seconds. Gold 186 has a half-life of about 10.7 minutes.


Is gold a radioactive element?

No, most natural gold to be found (197 Au) is stable but there are many radioactive isotopes of gold that are known and could be made.


Can radioactive gold decay?

All naturally occurring gold is 197Au, which is not radioactive. There are also 36 radioactive synthetic isotopes of gold, all of which decay.


Can alchemy transmute one element into another element?

It can and it has been done but turning lead into gold costs more than buying the gold alone. You see? Lead has 82 isotopes and gold has 79. So lead is 3 isotopes away to be converted into gold. But it cost less buying it as it comes from earth.


How many protons and electrons does gold-197 have?

All gold isotopes have 79 protons. If the gold atom has no electric charge it also has 79 electrons.


Are are the uses of gold isotopes?

The isotope 198Au is used as irradiation source for treating cancers.


How many electron and protons and neutrons does gold have?

Gold has 79 electrons and protons, and 118 neutrons (in the isotope 197Au); other isotopes of gold have different numbers of neutrons.


Does gold have a half-life?

Most gold is made up of isotopes that have never been observed to undergo radioactive decay and therefore has no known half-life. Some synthetically prepared isotopes of gold may be radioactive and thus have a half-life, the length of which would depend on the particular isotope.


What are some of golds isotopes?

Gold has only one stable isotope, all others are radioactive.


Why gold is stable?

Not all isotopes of gold are stable. Getting into the details is fairly complicated, but in essence it boils down to this: certain combinations of protons and neutrons are stable, and others aren't. For gold, there are stable combinations. For some other elements, it turns out that there is no number of neutrons that can stabilize that particular number of protons (francium, for example, has no stable isotopes).