answersLogoWhite
Performing Arts
Dance
Ballet

What are the similarities of contemporary and classical ballet?

434445

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
2007-10-09 06:16:29
2007-10-09 06:16:29

The fundamental: Ballet training. All leg and arm positions are basically the same, with any performance it is perfectly acceptable in both branches of ballet to "cheat" and stylize the details (like angle of hands or head) a bit. In Classical, however, there are limits to how much one can do. For example, rarely in a Classical ballet class do they ask you to work with parallel legs: they must always be turned out. Additionally, costumes and music are usually classical as well. Costume is pink tights, and some form of tutu, at least. Contemporary ballet is easier to define. It might, choreographically, appear to be a mixture of modern or lyrical dance and ballet. Costuming and music doesn't have to be classical either. It's really quite supportive of experements.

1

Related Questions

User Avatar

Classical ballet and contemporary.

User Avatar

Classical and contemporary ballet bear a resemblance to each other but there are many big differences. Contemporary ballet is usually much faster, and doesn't really tell a story it is usually abstract. There is also much more freedom in contemporary ballet, choreographers can try new and different steps, it also is not as focused on turnout and high extensions, and is alot lower to the ground then classical ballet which is all about turnout high extensions and is very lifted up.

User Avatar

classical and contemporary ballet

User Avatar

Contemporary ballet is less classical than say pointe. Its more of lyrical or jazz mixed with ballet technique

User Avatar

Classical ballet is usually danced to classical music. Contemporary ballet is danced to variety of music.

User Avatar

There is a spectrum of forms of ballet which are continuous based on choreography, but the categories recognized are: classical neo-classical contemporary modern-ballet

User Avatar

In contemporary you try to 'challenge the lines of ballet' by this I mean contracting and working in parralell

User Avatar

Contemporary ballet is a mixture of classical ballet with modern dance elements. A strong foundation of ballet is maintained with the addition of new movement that isn't confined to the restrictions of strictly classical ballet. Contemporary ballet companies to look into or search on youtube: Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet Alonzo King's Lines Ballet Company C Contemporary Ballet Company La La La Human Steps Netherland Dance Theatre

User Avatar

The three styles are classical, contemporary, or modern. :)

User Avatar

It depends on your opinion...like they say, beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder.

User Avatar

* Ballet d'action * Classical ballet * Contemporary ballet * Neoclassical ballet * Pre-romantic ballet * Romantic ballet And there are three ballet techniques: * French ballet * Russian Vaganova method * Italian Cecchetti method

User Avatar

The most significant difference between contemporary and classical ballet, is the basic way the body moves. Classical is very structured with emphysis on lifting up, poise and dramatic storytelling through fictional fables. Contemporary developed as a breakaway from the rigidity of classical, the concept being free and more earth bound. Today though there are several forms of contemporary that are quite structured. Generally though no specific story line is demonstrated, more of ideas and outlines as a guide to the inspriation of the movement.

User Avatar

Well classical ballet is slow and flowey and in contemporary ballet it has got a jazz in itThat's a pretty good question. Well, to be honest, classical ballet has a slow, fluid motion to it. Neoclassical is very retro, sort of using the style of the long surviving classical dance with the type of music and motion.Contemporary ballet is more modern, faster. More rapid.Classical ballet is the foundation of all ballet dance. It is the name given to the art form which spawned neo-classical and, later, contemporary ballet. All ballet dancers are trained in the classical style.What we call Classical ballets today are generally those that came from the latter half of the 19th century, when the development of pointe shoes led to a dramatic rise in the popularity of the art form. Ballets such as "Giselle", "Les Syhlpides" and "Swan Lake" constitute the Classical repertoire. Most often, there is a story to the ballet, but there are exceptions, such as "Pas de Quatre".Neoclassicism is generally attributed to George Balanchine, founder of the New York City Ballet. He favored technique over theatrics, so many of his ballets are performed with no sets. Very few Balanchine ballets have a story line.Contemporary ballet is often choreographed to modern music. Take, for instance, "Billboards" by the Joffery Ballet. It is energetic, expressive, and dynamic. It is diverse as our culture, but still looks best when done by classically trained artists.

User Avatar

contemporary danceclassical balletfolk dancemodern danceballroom dance

User Avatar

20th century ballet is more modern than the typical plie, tondue, arabesk. It has awkward movements and turned in feet with arms out of typical position. The best way to put it is "Breaking Boundaries" a more contemporary dance than classical ballet. Contemporary ballet, you should watch it to understand more :) here's a link ---> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mF2k4RRfBb0

User Avatar

1950s, as the dance form that is combining the modern dance elements and the classical ballet elements.

User Avatar

Not all ballet is smooth and flowy as it looks. Modern ballet can be more contemporary or jazz-like, with different hands or positions than traditional classical ballet. Lyrical ballet is smooth and flowy, so you can get away with less technique.

User Avatar

Complexions Contemporary Ballet was created in 1994.

User Avatar

There are quite a few dance styles. Some of the common ones include: - Ballet - Classical Ballet - Neo-classical Ballet - Contemporary Ballet - Contemporary - Modern - Lyrical - Tap - Jazz - Broadway - Hip Hop - Acrobatics (some do not classify this as a dance style) - Breakdance - Street There are many others, including cultural and religious dance styles; those are just off the top of my head.

User Avatar

There is only one style of ballet.However, There are lots of similar dance styles to ballet, for example Lyrical Modern or Contemporary.IMPROVED ANSWER..There are three main styles of ballet, classical, neoclassical, and contemporary ballet. They are all ballet, although the way of performing and the vocabulary and technical aspect of them are different. Classical ballet is a more formal type and follows traditional ballet techniques. It isn't as strict and you can get away with mistakes easily. It was the beginning of pointe work and the shoe was a regular ballet slipper with a tightened tip. Neoclassical ballet, on the other hand, is decidedly more strict. The dancers often dance at faster and more difficult tempos. The spacing on stage is also more modern and organization is more varied. Contemporary ballet was influenced by classical ballet and modern dance. It takes some pointe techniques from classical ballet, although it is less strict. It is influenced by modern dance in terms of the positions of the body and how you move. George Balanchine is considered a major innovator toward the introduction of contemporary ballet.Another Answer:There are five different styles or syllabuses from different countries.

User Avatar

What kind of contemporary? Pop? Rock? Country? In general, the similarities are huge. The chord progressions found in classical music are a basis for most types of popular genres today. For example, the use of cadence chords (I, IV, V7) is often very similar.

User Avatar

Ballet is actually very important for contemporary technique because contemporary is a mix of ballet and modern. You need the technique of ballet and the free movement of modern. Most contemporary dancers have a lot of training in ballet. Ballet also helps with strengthening and building the right muscles needed for contemporary as well as the basic movements such as turning.

User Avatar

Ballet is more restricted and technical Contemporary is more free

User Avatar

Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet was created in 2003.

User Avatar

Do you mean the difference between neo-classical ballet and classical ballet? If so, the differences can be very small or very large and depends on many factors such as choreography, music, what year it was created, and style. Neo-classical ballet tends to be more of a mix of contemporary/modern and ballet. Though the movement of the choreography may seem more contemporary like, you will notice that foundation of classical ballet positions, turnout, and posture is still being used throughout the dance. The music tends to be more down-to-earth or more upbeat compared to classical ballet music (example: Tchaikovsky). The costumes follow along with it (example: more of a newer and modern looking costume compared to romantic tutus or flat tutus. If you are comparing romantic ballet to classical ballet, the difference will seem very insignificant to the untrained eye and many of the factors are almost identical. The feeling and look of romantic ballet is very floaty and soft (example: La Sylphide) and classical ballet tends to have more sharper and defined movement (example Sleeping Beauty). In romantic ballet you will see more longer floaty looking tutus; like dresses. In classical flat tutus are more popular. You will also notice in romantic ballet, the plots are a lot more fiction based and are very fantasized (example: The Wilis in Giselle). While there is still tons of imaginary creatures in classical ballet it is more acting in real life problems. There is practically very minimum difference between the two technique-wise. The term "classical ballet" is mainly used to just define the difference between it and neo-classical ballet.


Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.