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What are two ways to find the north Star?

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2011-09-29 04:24:33
2011-09-29 04:24:33

One way to find Polaris, the North Star, is to look for the "Big Dipper" and then look at the two stars forming the edge of the "bowl" on the dipper opposite the handle (these are Merak and Dubhe). Look straight along the line formed by the two stars "up" from the dipper about twice the distance that separates the two stars and you should see it. It will generally be in a northern part of the sky. The North Star is also the only one that doesn't move through the night. All other stars will appear to rotate around it.

Another way is to locate the Little Dipper (Ursa Minor) and Polaris will be the star at the end of the handle.

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Easy. The north star does not move and is always due north from whereever you are. The trick is to work out which star is the North Star. First find the Big Dipper (or Plough as it called in the UK). Two of its stars point to the North Star.

Find The Plough constellation (big dipper) - on the 'bowl' of the formation - follow a line up from the two stars at the end, and the first star you come to in a direct line is the North Star.

constellations are used for the mapping of stars and makes it easier to find them also they are used to tell farmers when to plant their crops.Constellations where used by sailors, so they could find their way. The northen star always directed where north was, so they could find there way. The way to find the north star is to find the plough. The plough has seven stars in but you need to concentrate on the two stars on the top-right and bottom-right, which are in line with each other. Find these two stars and go up, the first star you see in line with the two stars is the north star.

look for the constillation called the plow.the first 2 stars point 2 the north star. its the really bright one! === === look for the constillation called the plow.the first 2 stars point 2 the north star. its the really bright one! === === look for the constillation called the plow.the first 2 stars point 2 the north star. its the really bright one! === ===

Find the Big Dipper in the northern sky - everyone can find that. The two stars that make up the front of the dippers "bowl" point directly up at the North Star.

Yes.Locate the North Star (Polaris) in the night sky. The North Star is the last star in the handle of the Little Dipper constellation. If you have trouble finding it, find the Big Dipper. The two lowest stars in the Big Dipper (the outermost stars of the cup of the dipper) form a straight line that "points" to the North Star. You may also find the constellation Cassiopeia, which is always opposite the Big Dipper. The North Star is located about midway between the central star of Cassiopeia and the Big Dipper (see figure).

north... if you can find the big dipper, then the two rightmost stars make a line that points directly to it

The two pointer stars point to Polaris, the north star

Locate the Big Dipper and follow the line formed by the last two stars (opposite end from the "handle") to the bright star to which they lead. This star is Polaris, or the North Star, and also indicates which direction is north.

The names of the two stars which point to the North Star are Dubhe and Merak. These two stars form the right hand side of the cup portion of The Big Dipper.

Find the Big Dipper/Saucepan/Ursa Major - it's viewable to the North [See related link for a star map] and follow the edge of the "pan" - the two stars (Merak and Dubhe) away from the handle, and measure those stars about five times upwards. They will take you to the North Star (Polaris) Alternatively download stellarium - a free open source astronomy program [See related link] that will allow you to find any star you want and more.....

they are two antislavery newspapers

Polaris, also known as the North Star, is the final star in the handle of Ursa Minor, which is known as "The Little Dipper." It is easy to find because the two stars that make up the side of the bowl of Ursa Major that are not attached to its handle point directly to it.

astronomical north is a more specific reference to the north star. The north star is actually part of a 3 star constellation that is moving, as a result, true north is falling between two stars in the constellation. True North represents what the direct actual north is, but astronomical north is referring to what we see as north by the stars.

The two antislavery newspapers were called The North Star and The Liberator.

Yes it is. If you draw a line out from the last two stars of the Plough (opposite end to the 'handle') they will point directly to the North Star.

The North Star is a three stars system consisting of a white supergiant and two white main sequence stars.

The two antislavery newspapers were called The North Star and The Liberator.

Yes, this is generally how people find the north star (or pole star), since it is not especially bright or easy to find without the 'pointer' stars at the end of Ursa Major (or the plough (or the Big Dipper)). If you locate the two stars at the end of this constellation you can then locate the pole start and find north. The constellation looks like a big saucepan, find the two stars opposite the `handle` then imagine a straight line leading through both of these stars and carry on another 4 or so times the length of the length between the two.

AnswerOne way to find Polaris, the North Star, is to look for the "Big Dipper" and then look at the two stars forming the edge of the "bowl" on the dipper opposite the handle (these are Merak and Dubhe). Look straight along the line formed by the two stars "up" from the dipper about twice the distance that separates the two stars and you should see it. It will generally be in a northern part of the sky. The North Star is also the only one that doesn't move through the night. All other stars will appear to rotate around it.Another way is to locate the Little Dipper (Ursa Minor) and Polaris will be the star at the end of the handle.

The two ways are:empirical: measure ittheoretical: calculate it (using formulae).

Compared = find ways in which two or more things are the same. Contrasted = find ways in which two or more things are different.

Use the 2 stars in the front of the bowl of the Big Dipper - draw an imaginary line from those two and you will come to Polaris - the North Star


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