The Bible
Judaism

What brought about the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem?

345

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2018-02-21 18:24:03
2018-02-21 18:24:03

Since the question doesn't specify, we'll discuss both the destruction of the First Temple and the Second Temple (as well as the loss of the Ten Tribes). In each case, we'll give 1) a spiritual reason, and 2) a political ("current events-type") reason.

The loss of the Ten Tribes (some 2650 years ago):

1) The spiritual reason was that for over two centuries the Ten Tribes had cut themselves off from the more-righteous tribe of Judah and the Temple, and had been more lax about the prohibition against idolatry. The prophets, such as Hosea, had warned them but were not heeded widely enough.

2) The temporal reason was that Assyria conquered them and exiled them.

A positive result: Had the Ten Tribes not been exiled, the Tribe of Judah would have continued emulating their ways (Jeremiah 3:7-8) and might have gone lost like the Ten Tribes.

The First Destruction (some 2500 years ago):

1) The general spiritual reason for the Babylonian Exile was that God had found the people of Judah to be below the spiritual level that was a requisite for having His presence remain among them. The prophets had warned them (Jeremiah 7:25) but were not sufficiently heeded (2 Chronicles 36:16). Once God's presence no longer felt welcome in the Holy Temple, its destruction was just a matter of time (Talmud, Rosh Hashanah 31a, and midrash Eichah Rabbah 1:43).

A more specific spiritual reason was the egregious sins of Menasheh, king of Judah (2 Kings 21:11-13 and 24:3).

2) The temporal circumstance was the fact that King Yehoiakim, after having been obedient to Nevuchadnezzar (king of Babylonia), became insubordinate (2 Kings 24:1); and Nevuchadnezzar responded by conquering the land of Judah, destroying the First Temple and exiling the populace.

Some positive results: the false prophets, at long last, were silenced forever. They had predicted that Judah would remain independent of Babylonia (Jeremiah ch.27) and no Destruction would take place.

Also, the lure of idolatry finally weakened, since the Destruction and Exile happened exactly as predicted by the true Prophets, who were the same ones who had spoken ceaselessly against dabbling in idolatry.

The Second Destruction (in 68 CE):

1) The spiritual reason was that the Jewish people were plagued by an internal enemy, the Sadducees, who had been dragging the spiritual level of the people downwards for many decades. These were men of power who (along the lines of the earlier Hellenizers) were less interested in Torah than in pleasure, politics, and obsequiousness to the Herodian kings and the Romans. Even the once-pious Hasmoneans had eventually become infiltrated by the Sadducees. They had fomented unnecessary wars, sown discord among the Jewish people (see Talmud, Yoma 9b), and had even killed a number of the leading Torah-sages (Talmud, Kidushin 66a).

2) The political trigger to the Second Destruction was the anti-Roman revolt fomented by the Zealots, who acted against the advice of the Rabbis and left the Romans no choice but to crush the people (Talmud, Gittin 56).

A positive result: The Second Destruction, as painful and tragic as it was, at least accomplished the disappearance of the impious cliques (as alluded in the parable in the Talmud, Gittin 56b, in which the "barrel of honey" represents Jerusalem and the Temple, and the "serpent" hints to the Zealots and Sadducees, among others). Once Jerusalem and the Temple were razed, the men of power melted away and the internal life of the Jewish communities returned to the aegis of the Torah-sages.

Other non-traditional groups including the Samaritans and the Essenes also now permanently dissociated themselves from the Jewish people.

001
🎃
0
🤨
0
😮
0
😂
0
User Avatar

User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2015-01-11 14:29:17
2015-01-11 14:29:17

The exile of the Ten Tribes (some 2650 years ago):
1) The spiritual reason was that for over two centuries the Ten Tribes had cut themselves off from the more-righteous tribe of Judah and the Temple, and had been more lax about the prohibition against idolatry.


2) The temporal reason was that Assyria conquered them and exiled them.

A positive result: Had the Ten Tribes not been exiled, the Tribe of Judah would have continued emulating their ways (Jeremiah 3:7-8).

Link: Where are the Ten Tribes?


The Babylonian exile (some 2500 years ago):
1) The spiritual reason was that God found the people of Judah to be below the spiritual level that was a requisite for having His presence among them. The prophets had warned them (Jeremiah 7:25) of this.
A more specific spiritual reason was the egregious sins of Menasheh, king of Judah (2 Kings 21:11-13 and 24:3).

2) The temporal circumstance was the fact that King Yehoiakim, after having been obedient to Nevuchadnezzar (king of Babylonia), became insubordinate (2 Kings 24:1).

Some positive results: the false prophets, at long last, were silenced forever.
Also, the lure of idolatry finally weakened, since the Destruction and Exile happened exactly as predicted by the true Prophets.

Link: Israelite prophecy


The present 2000-year exile:
1) The spiritual reason was that the Jews were plagued by an internal enemy, the Sadducees, who had been dragging the spiritual level of the people downwards for many decades. They had fomented unnecessary wars, and sown discord among the Jews (see Talmud, Yoma 9b).

2) The political trigger to the exile at the hand of the Romans was the anti-Roman revolt fomented by the Zealots, who acted against the advice of the Rabbis.

A positive result: The Second Destruction accomplished the disappearance of the impious cliques. Once Jerusalem and the Temple were razed, the men of power melted away and the internal life of the Jewish communities reverted to the Torah-sages. Link: What did Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai do?

See also the other Related Links.

Link: Jewish history timeline

Link: The Diaspora

001
🎃
0
🤨
0
😮
0
😂
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


Ezekiel and Jeremiah, among others.See also: more about the Destruction



Vespasian began the war which led to the Destruction, and Titus concluded it.


Until 70 C.E. Jews made pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem. With the destruction of the Temple, Judaism has not had pilgrimage.


Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.Vespasian could easily afford to build the Colosseum and his other structures due to the loot brought back to Rome from the temple in Jerusalem.


Jesus was first brought to the temple, when he was a baby to be dedicated. and symon and Anna were there.


No. It was destroyed at the time of the destruction of Jerusalem by the army of Babylon.


The Roman Emperor Titus.See also:More about the destruction(s) of Jerusalem


Jerusalem was not destroyed in 70 AD. The temple was destroyed. Much of the city remained after the final battle. One can read two messages in the destruction of the temple. One was that it actually was an accident that it was burnt, as the ancient writers claim. The other was that the destruction of the temple was a fulfillment of Jesus' prophesy.



Many Jews were exiled from the Land of Israel, and the Romans designated the territory Syria-Palaestina. They also brought people in from other areas to lessen the Jewish population.


The Roman destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem took place in 70 AD under the rule of the emperor Vespasian. The temple itself was destroyed by Titus, the son of Vespasian, who was the general in charge of the siege.


The second Temple in Jerusalem was burned at 70 CE when Titus reconquered the rebelling Jewish population after a four year war.



A synagogue is the Jewish house of prayer, similar to a church in Christianity or a mosque in Islam. Jerusalem is the holy city in Israel where the Temple stood before its destruction by the Romans. A Synagogues are meant to face Jerusalem, to remind us of the Temple while we pray,


yes herod's temple is in Jerusalem


The Romans Destroyed The second Temple of Jerusalem.


Many of the Christians had already fled from Jerusalem, and so were not overly affected. Their worship also was not dependant on the Temple.


the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in 587-86 BC when they were exiled to Babylonia up to the present time


Jerusalem, when he went to the temple in Jerusalem.


Jerusalem was never destroyed, it was the temple that was destroyed. Jerusalem, or course, suffered damage during the siege and final capture, but the city itself was not destroyed. In fact, the ancient sources say that the temple was destroyed by accident. This capture of Jerusalem came about under the emperor Vespasian by his son Titus.


Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.Vespasian was emperor when the temple at Jerusalem was burnt by his son, Titus.


There have been two eras in the history of the Jews in Israel that centered around the physical Temple in Jerusalem.The first ended with the destruction of the first temple by the Babylonians, in 586 BCE.The second ended with the destruction of the second temple by the Romans, in 70 AD.21st Century Jews, with a sense of history, look forward to a renewed national and spiritual identity centered around a third temple in Jerusalem either physical or spiritual, depending on the Jewish denomination.


That was the Babylonian exile, which followed the destruction of the First Temple in Jerusalem in 586 BCE.


The development of Rabbinical Judaism was what caused Judaism to survive the destruction of the Temple. As with the destruction of the first Temple, prayer replaced sacrifice.Answer:As central as the Temple was to Judaism, there is something more central, and that is the Torah. The sealing of the canon by the Men of the Great Assembly, the redaction of the Talmud, Rabbinic leadership in general, and the observance and learning of the Torah, were what kept Judaism viable with or without the Temple.



Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.