Astronomy

What causes meteorites to burn up?

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2017-06-29 14:27:00
2017-06-29 14:27:00

They don't burn, they melt - from friction.

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Meteorites do not burn up. A meteorite is a meteor that has hit the surface. Most meteors burn up in the mesosphere.


They burn up because of friction in the atmosphere


No. By definition, a meteorite has reached Earth's surface. Most meteors burn up in the atmosphere. Those that don't reach the surface as meteorites.


Meteors burn up in the high atmosphere. If they land on Earth, they become meteorites.


No. A meteorite is an object from space that has made it to the surface. Most meteors burn up in the mesosphere.


They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.They are not called meteors. They are meteoroids. If they enter the Earth's atmosphere and start to burn up, then they are meteors. If they get through the atmosphere and land on Earth, they are then called meteorites.


The moon doesn't have an atmosphere, so meteorites hit the surface and create the craters. Earth's atmosphere causes most meteorites to burn up due to air friction before the meteorite can crash on to the surface. A 'shooting-star' is a meteorite burning up in the sky.


Smaller meteorites will burn up in the atmosphere.


The moon have no atmosphere at all to burn up the meteorite. Most meteorites burn up in the earth's atmosphere.


They are less common because most meteors burn up entirely before they get a chance to strike the earth and become meteorites.


THe Moon doesn't have an atmosphere, which is what protects Earth from most meteorites.


The heat is cause by friction of the meteorite against the molecules of the atmosphere. This is also why most meteorites burn up before they reach the ground.


A meteoroid is a small metallic or rocky body. If it passes through the atmosphere causing it to burn up is called a meteor or shooting star. Any remnants that reach the earth are called meteorites.


Smaller objects burn up in the atmosphere, but large ones, or at least fragments of them, do reach the surface and become meteorites.


Most of the meteorites which reach Earth burn up as they enter Earth's atmosphere due the heat caused by friction. The moon has no atmosphere.


Most of the meteorites which reach Earth burn up as they enter Earth's atmosphere due the heat caused by friction. The moon has no atmosphere.


Most of the meteorites which reach Earth burn up as they enter Earth's atmosphere due the heat caused by friction. The moon has no atmosphere.


I suppose there are more meteorites that become extinct than stars. Meteorites burn up in the atmosphere every night. Not only on this planet, but planets all around the universe. Some survive but get destroyed when crash-landing into a planet. A lot of meteorites also get sucked into stars.


The mesosphere is where meteorites burn up. Most people call them shooting stars.


More reach the surface of the moon because there is no atmosphere to heat and burn them up.


The earth's atmosphere protects it from small meteorites - actually the specific part is the mesosphere. When meteorites contact this part of the atmosphere they wither burn up or become very small. I don't understant the "earth's moon is" part, sorry.


Because... there's almost no atmosphere on the moon. On Earth - the atmosphere causes meteorites to heat up to the point that they usually evaporate before striking the surface. On the moon - they don't heat up enough, and survive to land on the surface.


this is because the friction caused by the rock traveling at tremendous speeds through the earths atmosphere causes the rock to heat up and disintegrates it before it can reach the surface. this is the same reason that the space shuttle has a heat shield on its bottom.


all the time, but the meteorites just burn up in the atmosphere, this is caused by the thick atmosphere on earth, which generate a huge friction between the meteorites and the air molecules. You can actually see the it burning up in the sky, commonly known as falling stars. But it is not all meteors, which burn up in the atmosphere, it just have to be big enough to sustain its shape all the way to the ground, but this only happens rarely. but as you can see on mars it has a lot of craters, and that is simply because the atmosphere is much thinner.


It takes a while for air friction to heat them through. Also some are massive enough that they never burn up but hit the earth instead, becoming what we call meteorites.



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