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What does P14 stamped inside a ring mean?

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βˆ™ 2006-09-03 11:56:06

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P14 is the stamp for platinum.

2006-09-03 11:56:06
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"The CMO [Chief Medical Officer] of England, in his Annual Report (DH, 2001), highlighted that people with high blood pressure are three times more likely to develop heart disease and stroke, and twice as likely to die from these diseases than those with normal levels."(p14). Professor Dr. Diederick Grobbee claims that there is no evidence of a causal link between salt intake and mortality or cardiovascular events. One study found that low urinary sodium is associated with greater risk of myocardial infarction among treated hypertensive men. * left ventricular hypertrophy (cardiac enlargement): "Evidence suggests that high salt intake causes left ventricular hypertrophy, a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease, independently of blood pressure effects." (p3) "…there is accumulating evidence that high salt intake predicts left ventricular hypertrophy." (, p12) Excessive salt (sodium) intake, combined with an inadequate intake of water, can cause hypernatremia. It can exacerbate renal disease. * edema (BE: oedema): A decrease in salt intake has been suggested to treat edema (BE: oedema) (fluid retention). * duodenal ulcers and gastric ulcers A large scale study by Nancy Cook et alshows that people with high-normal[1] blood pressure who significantly reduced the amount of salt in their diet decreased their chances of developing cardiovascular disease by 25% over the following 10 to 15 years. Their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease decreased by 20%.Sea salt and peppercorns.A salt mill for sea salt.This section summarizes the salt intake recommended by the health agencies of various countries. Recommendations tend to be similar. Note that targets for the population as a whole tend to be pragmatic (what is achievable) while advice for an individual is ideal (what is best for health). For example, in the UK target for the population is "eat no more than 6 g a day" but for a person is 4 g. Intakes can be expressed variously as salt or sodium and in various units. * 1 g sodium = 1,000 mg sodium = 42 mmol sodium = 2.5 g salt United Kingdom: In 2003, the UK's Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) recommended that, for a typical adult, the Reference Nutrient Intake is 4 g salt per day (1.6 g or 70 mmol sodium). However, average adult intake is two and a half times the Reference Nutrient Intake for sodium. "Although accurate data are not available for children, conservative estimates indicate that, on a body weight basis, the average salt intake of children is higher than that of adults." SACN aimed for an achievable target reduction in average intake of salt to 6 g per day (2.4 g or 100 mmol sodium) - this is roughly equivalent to a teaspoonful of salt. The SACN recommendations for children are: * 0-6 months old: less than 1 g/day * 7-12 months: 1 g/day * 1-3 years: 2 g/day * 4-6 years: 3 g/day * 7-10 years: 5 g/day * 11-14 years: 6 g/day SACN states, "The target salt intakes set for adults and children do not represent ideal or optimum consumption levels, but achievable population goals." Republic of Ireland: The Food Safety Authority of Ireland endorses the UK targets "emphasising that the RDA of 1.6 g sodium (4 g salt) per day should form the basis of advice targeted at individuals as distinct from the population health target of a mean salt intake of 6 g per day."(p16) Canada: Health Canada recommends an Adequate Intake (AI) and an Upper Limit (UL) in terms of sodium. * 0-6 months old: 0.12 g/day (AI) * 7-12 months: 0.37 g/day (AI) * 1-3 years: 1 g/day (AI) 1.5 g/day (UL) * 4-8 years: 1.2/day (AI) 1.9 g/day (UL) * 9-13 years: 1.5 g/day (AI) 2.2 g/day (UL) * 14-50 years: 1.5 g/day (AI) 2.3 g/day (UL) * 51-70 years: 1.3 g/day (AI) 2.3 g/day (UL) * 70 years and older: 1.2 g/day (AI) 2.3 g/day (UL) New Zealand * Adequate Intake (AI) 0.46 - 0.92 g sodium = 1.2 - 2.3g salt * Upper Limit (UL)) 2.3 g sodium = 5.8 g salt Australia: The recommended dietary intake (RDI) is 0.92 g-2.3 g sodium per day (= 2.3 g-5.8 g salt) USA: The Food and Drug Administration itself does not make a recommendation but refers readers to Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. These suggest that US citizens should consume less than 2,300 mg of sodium (= 2.3 g sodium = 5.8 g salt) per day. Ref: en.wikipedia.org


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Why is Zamboanga del Sur called the Little Hongkong in the Philippines?

Pagadian City, gateway to Zamboanga del Sur, the largest province of Western Mindanao and also a point of entry to the cities of Ozamis, Iligan and Cotabato, has rolling terrain encompassing both commercial and residential districts, reminiscent of the famous Crown Colony and I branded it and eventually has earned for it the sobriquet Little Hong Kong of the South. Below is the link of my article which I posted to my blog after visiting Pagadian City in January 2006. I was really surprised to see that my branding of the city has spread like wildfire, yet local government officials themselves did not know anything about it. MONDAY, JANUARY 09, 2006 Pagadian City Vows To Become Regional Trading Hub ZAMBOANGA DEL SUR (Zamboanga Journal) Pagadian City, the provincial capital of Zamboanga del Sur, has began a massive and ambitious development project aimed at turning the once sleepy mountain enclave, into a bustling trading and government regional center in the southern Philippines. Home to about 160,000 people, Pagadian -- with a total land area of 37,880 hectares and 13 urban and 41 rural villages -- is one of the most vibrant and promising cities in Mindanao, said mayor Samuel Co. He said the aggressive increase in development projects were triggered by the recent transfer of major government regional agencies from Zamboanga City to Pagadian. And also the impending relocation near Pagadian of the Southern Command, the largest military installation outside Manila, now based in Zamboanga City. "We have allocated hundreds of millions of pesos to fund new infrastructure projects and the development of the regional center, the rehabilitation of our air and sea ports. "And the renovation of government buildings and sophisticated communications and other I.T. projects that would put Pagadian in the map of developed cities, not only in the Philippines, but also abroad," Co told the Zamboanga Journal. He said Pagadian is currently working on a P115-million fishing port complex, the P64-million public market. It has recently inaugurated a P14-million integrated bus depot. Co said they will also planning to put up a multi-million fruit processing plant. "Oh, we have a lot of work to do. Right now, we are busy on some development projects and we are also working on how to improve our ecotourism program," he said. Co said he also introduced the use of water wheels to generate electricity for farmers in far-flung villages. "Farmers are happy about the water wheels. Before they only see them in books and television, but now we are using water wheel to generate electricity in remote villages," he said. He said the local airliner Asian Spirit has opened new passenger flights between Manila to Pagadian. "We really worked hard and negotiated for this, and the Asian Spirit now has regular flights from Manila to Pagadian and back," he said. President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo has ordered the transfer of all regional government offices and agencies to Pagadian to make transactions easy to other provinces such as Zamboanga Sibugay, Zamboanga del Norte and Zamboanga del Sur that comprise the Western Mindanao region. Arroyo's decision to transfer the regional offices was based on Executive Order 429 issued by then President Corazon Aquino in October 1990. Co said they paid the rental of regional government offices for six months as a gesture of goodwill to welcome the thousands of new tenants. Co said the regional Bureau of Jail Management and Penology and the Philippine Coconut Authority are now in Pagadian City. Agriculture and fishery are the main sources of income of local residents, but Co said the city is being groomed to become the region's main source of mango and seaweed capital. "Fishing is a major economic activity and also lumber processing due to the peninsula's excellent stands of Philippine hardwoods," he said. An attractive investment package would be offered to local and foreign business groups, he said, to lure them into opening trades in Pagadian or make the city a business gateway to other provinces in the region. Designated as a chartered city in June 1969, Pagadian is also an important processing center for rice, corn, and coconuts produced in surrounding areas, Co said. He said Pagadian is also known for being the "undisputed" cleanest and greenest city for several years now by different civic groups. "We have an excellent ecological solid waste management program, watershed management program, and a massive beautification project for the different villages, among others," Co said. He said his administration is also working on an ambitious tourism project that would attract not only Filipino visitors, but also foreign tourists. "Aside from being peaceful, Pagadian prides itself with many pristine and white sandy beaches. We offer our rich cultural heritage, our exotic foods and the kind hospitality of our people," the 39-year old mayor said. The internationally renowned Pagadian Kumbingan Ensemble, a cultural and creative dance group, won many accolade during its latest performance in the recent Singapore Street Festival. The event gathered Asian cultural artists and workers in a one-day festival of performances and cultural exhibitions as part of the annual Singapore Arts Festival. The Kumbingan Ensemble performed folk and traditional Muslim dances, and was critically acclaimed by international artists. In December, Co brought his cultural pride in Zamboanga City for the annual mardi gras called the Zamboanga Hermosa Festival and was highly acclaimed for their dance performances. He said they have set aside unspecified funding for the trainings and costumes not only of the Kumbingan Ensemble, but other cultural groups also. "Pagadian is one of the country's show windows and everybody is really working hard to promote tourism and attract investments, not only in my place, but in the southern region as well," he said. Pagadian is popularly called the "Little Hong Kong of the South" because of its rolling terrain, reminiscent of the former Crown colony.


What did the people worship before Judaism?

The Bible tells us that the northern kingdom, Israel, was at all times polytheistic. The biblical references to the kings of Israel show every one of them as polytheistic in their beliefs. Biblical references that tell us about popular religion in Israel - what the people themselves believed - show that the nation was polytheistic from its inception until its destruction by the Assyrians. The southern kingdom, Judah, was polytheistic until the reign of Hezekia, who made a failed attempt to impose monotheism in the 7th century BCE. Arguably, if a recognisable forerunner of Judaism existed before this time, it was only a small sect, constantly at odds with the powerful kings of Judah. Hezekia's son, Manasseh, allowed polytheism to flourish once again, evidence that monotheism had not taken root among the ordinary people. It was only in the time of King Josiah, almost a century later, that the beginnings of what we would call Judaism really became the state religion of Judah. Yahweh, the Judaic God, was the supreme God of Judah. But there were lesser gods. There are frequent references to Asherah and to her groves, throughout the Bible. The Second Book of Kings (23:5) tells us that priests at Jerusalem burnt incense to the sun and the moon and to the planets and to all the host of heaven. Since Asherah was the Hebrew Venus, she would probably have been the goddess of fertility. Archaeologists have found two separate engravings dedicated to "Yahweh and his Asherah", that show Asherah to have been worshipped as the consort of Yahweh. Archaeologists have also found numerous small carved pregnant female statues, that they believe represented Asherah. The Bible itself tells us of other gods the Hebrew people worshipped, including the moon god, sun god and many of the same gods as their neighbours worshipped. There was no heaven or hell - souls of the dead simply went to a place of rest, sheol, regardless of the life that had been led. There was no Satan nor angels. The two supernatural men who met Lot in Sodom were elohim - gods.=== === Summary: The religion of Israel was always monotheistic and distinct from the religions of the surrounding peoples. Polytheistic idolatry was always seen as an aberration and departure from the true religion of Israel. Literary theories do not adequately account for the evidence both internal to and external to the Jewish scriptures and developed without due recognition of archaeological evidence and imposed invalid assumptions on the religion of Israel.During the 19th Century a particular view prevailed in scholarly circles which basically applied evolutionary principles to the field of religion, in this case, the religion of Israel. Biblical archaeologist G E Wright, PhD explained it this way: "The Graf-Wellhausen reconstruction of the history of Israel's religion was, in effect, as assertion that within the pages of the Old Testament we have a perfect example of the evolution of religion from animism in patriarchal times through henotheism to montheism. The last was first achieved in pure form during the sixth and fifth centuries. The patriarchs worshipped the spirits in trees, stones springs, mountains etc. The God of pre-prophetic Israel was a tribal deity, limited in his power to the land of Palestine. Under the influence of Baalism, he even became a fertility god and sufficiently tolerant to allow the early religion of Israel to be distinguished from that of Canaan. It was the prophets who were the true innovators and who produced most, if not all, of that which was truly distinctive in Israel, the grand culmination coming with the universalism of II Isaiah. Thus we have animism, or polydemonism, a limited tribal deity, implicit ethical monotheism, and finally explicit and universal monotheism." Wright, George Ernest "The present state of Biblical Archaeology " in The Study of the Bible Today and Tomorrow ed by Harold R Willoughby p89-90. The assumptions of the documentary hypothesis were that the religion of Israel must be understood to follow an evolutionary paradigm in its development. This included their belief that the supernatural is impossible and that Israel's religion must be explained in purely naturalistic terms. In this regard J E Orr stated: "...if, on impartial consideration, it can be shown that the religion of Israel admits of explanation on purely natural principles, then the historian will be justified in his verdict that it stands in this respect on the same footing as other religions. If, on the other hand , fair investigation brings out a different result, - if it demonstrates that this religion has features which place it in a different category from all others, and compel us to postulate for it a different and higher origin, - then the fact must be frankly recognized as part of the scientific result, and the nature and extent of this higher element must be made the subject of inquiry. It will not do to override the facts - if facts they are- by a priori dogmatic assumptions on the one side any more than on the other." Orr, James. The Problem of the Old Testament, New York:Charles Scribner's Sons, 1917.p14 In this work Orr goes on to point out, as have many since, that the documentary hypothesis started with certain assumptions which they set out to prove. Another of these was that such a lofty view of God was not possible for Israel in the time of Moses since they had not reached that stage in the development (evolution) of their religion. Speaking of the creation of the world, Wellhausen himself stated "in a youthful people such a theological abstraction is unheard of and so with the Hebrew we find both the word and the notion only coming into use after the Babylonian exile." Wellhausen,J . Prolegomena to the History of Israel. Trans. by Black and Menzies. Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black,1885. Originally published in 1878 under the title History of Israel. One of the problems with this approach, as quite a number of scholars have noted is that it involves circular reasoning. They found what they already believed was so. Orr as have many after him, is speaking of the necessity of keeping an open mind.Another major flaw in treating the religion of Israel this way was that it ignored all of the many archaeological discoveries that were beginning to be made which explicitly contradicted the documentary theory. One of these is noted by Kathleen Kenyon during her excavations at Jericho (1952-58) noted the absence of a temple after the destruction level at which she believed belonged to a new people who could have been the Israelites, thus pointing to centralized worship. Another excavation at Hazor which studied the relevant destruction layer found deliberate desecration of cultic objects, indicative of Israelite monotheism.Scholars have noted the vast difference between the religion of Israel, apostacy notwithstanding, and that of the surrounding Canaanite peoples. Wright notes that "Biblical Hebrew had no word for goddess. Equally phenomenal is the preservation of God's mystery and holiness by the prohibition of images, either of God himself or of any other spiritual being in heaven or on earth, a prohibition preserved in the oldest law which the Old Testament contains." Wright, The Old Testament Against Its Environment. Chicago: Henry Regnery Co., 1950. Central to this whole question is the time when Judaism began. All would acknowledge that the Hebrew Bible, specifically the Torah forms the basis of Judaism. According to the documentary view this was written much later than Moses and not at all by him and thus the specific claims made by the Bible itself are thus viewed as fictions. Such a view is contrary to the evidence, as well as attacking the credibility of the document itself.Since the actual evidence both internal to the scriptures and external to them (chiefly archaeological) points clearly to Mosaic authorship of the Pentateuch, we must look prior to the time of Moses to examine what the people worshiped before then. Right from the beginning scholars have noted the distinguishing mark of Israelite religion as that of monotheism. Merrill Unger notes that even the patriarchs who were in the middle of pagan polytheism, and occultic divination were 'in danger of corruption. The teraphim of Rachel (Gen.31:19), the 'strange gods' which Jacob ordered put away from his household (Gen. 35:2) and hid under an oak in Shechem (v.4), are indicative of contamination. However the patriarchs were remarkably free from the divinatory methods of surrounding pagan peoples.' Unger, Merrill F. Archaeology and the Old Testament. Grand Rapids:Zondervan Publishing co. 1954. page 127Regarding the earliest stages of the religion of Israel Wright notes: "..even in its earliest and basic forms is so utterly different from that of the contemporary polytheisms that one simply cannot explain it fully by evolutionary or environmental categories."Wright G E, op. cit., page 7. Similarly W F Albright points out that 'every fresh publication of Canaanite mythological texts makes the gulf between the religions of Canaan and of Israel increasingly clear.' Albright, W F. "Recent Progress in North Canaanite Research," Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research. No. 70, April 1938, 24.As part of the documentary development of the religion of Israel the existence of idols is discussed as proof of the progression. Evidence is found which supports the theory, even though another explanation would be logically just as valid and would also square with the Biblical record and the external evidence.No-one disputes the existence of both idolatry and polytheism, and even the existence of a mixture of these with the pure worship of Yahweh. There was, throughout the Old Testament history of Israel a constant conflict between true and false religion, with the latter frequently in the ascendancy.It is quite another thing to draw the conclusion that the true religion of Israel was therefore polytheism and idolatry when in actual fact these are presented as a departure from the true religion of Israel. Regarding the quote above:"Archaeologists have found two separate engravings that show Asherah to have been worshipped as the consort of Yahweh."According to Ungers Bible Dictionary Asherah was not the consort of Yahweh but of Baal. (page 484)In addition to this, it is quite incorrect from a Hebrew grammatical viewpoint to change asherah to Asherah. "The technical question here is this: Can a proper noun be determined? According to the authorities on biblical grammar and the formalities of Biblical Hebrew, the answer is no. The initial "A" in the word cannot be capitalized, and the word must therefore be a common noun. In other words, asherah can't be Asherah. It has to be something else. There are several candidates: One is a wooden pole; another is a sacred grove; and a third is a holy place at which you can invoke the deity, or pronounce a blessing. " ["Yahweh of Samaria and His Asherah", by David Noel Freedman, Biblical Archaeologist (vol 50).]Apparently Freedman's position is in favor of asherah referring to a consort for Yahweh but he acknowledges the necessary constraints of Hebrew grammar.However, many writers assume this indirect reference to be 'as good as' a directreference (why, they never say…), and hence ascribe 'consort-status' to Asherah. But it should be noted that there is still quite a leap from 'yahweh and his asherah' to 'yahweh and his CONSORT ashera. (source,Glenn Miller: See Link)In any case, even if this were to be indicating that someone had (capital A) Asherah as a consort to Yahweh, contrary to the true religion, this would not prove that the true religion of Israel was officially polytheism. Given the history of Israel, it would be surprising indeed if no idolatrous objects were found, but it is the conclusions drawn from this that are in question.The fact that idolatry is so frequently mentioned in the Old Testament is an indication both of the fact that it happened but even more importantly of the fact that it was regarded as an utter abomination in God's sight - the goddess Asherah apparently particularly delighting in destroying humans, as highlighted in the Baal epic. The context in which it was so frequently mentioned is also to show the need for God's judgment first upon the Northern kingdom but then finally upon Judah. Thus Israel's idolatry was not the norm, even though undoubtedly widely practiced, but was an aberration from the true monotheistic religion of Israel. This is how it is repeatedly described, the Kings of the Northern Kingdom, beginning from Jeroboam I 'caused Israel to sin'. This is mentioned no less than thirteen times. This poses another problem for the view that Israel's monotheism only developed later, since the united kingdom of Israel under Solomon clearly had a temple with centralized worship.One way that this problem is resolved is either to ignore it altogether, or to suggest as some do that Solomon never existed. A reason that this idea has gained a degree of traction among archaeologists is that they find no evidence for Solomon in a particular period of the history of Israel. The reason for this is relatively simple. The wrong time period is being examined and so one would not expect to find any evidence for Solomon, if the Biblical record were true.


What guns were used in World War 2?

AlbaniaHandguns§ Glisenti Model 1910Rifles§ Carcano§ Mannlicher-Schönauer§ Mosin-NagantSubmachineguns§ Beretta Model 1918Machineguns§ Schwarzlose MG M.07/12§ Vickers machine gunAustriaHandguns§ Steyr M1912Rifles§ Steyr-Mannlicher M1895Submachinegunns§ MP 34Machineguns§ MG 30§ Schwarzlose MG M.07/12AustraliaHandguns§ Webley Mk.VI (.455) & Mk.IV (.38/200)§ Enfield revolver§ Browning Hi-PowerRifles§ Lee-Enfield§ Rifle No. 5 Mk I§ Charlton Automatic RifleSubmachine Guns§ Owen§ Austen submachine gun§ Thompson M1928A1§ StenMachine guns§ Lewis Gun§ Bren light machine gun§ Vickers machine gunAnti-Tank weapons§ PIAT§ Boys anti-tank rifleBelgiumHandguns§ Nagant M1895§ FN Model 1910/22Rifles§ Mauser M1936 (similar to Mauser 98)Machine Guns§ Maxim Mo8§ M1918 Browning Automatic RifleBrazilHandguns§ Colt M1917 revolver§ Colt M1911Rifles§ Mauser M1908 (similar to Gewehr 98)§ vz.24§ M1 Garand (U.S Lend Lease)§ M1 Carbine (U.S Lend Lease)§ Springfield M1903 (U.S Lend Lease)Submachine Guns§ Thompson submachine gun(U.S Lend Lease)§ M3 grease gun(U.S Lend Lease)Machine guns§ Browning M1919(U.S Lend Lease)§ Hotchkiss M1914§ M1941 Johnson machine gun(U.S Lend Lease)BulgariaHandguns§ Luger P08 pistolRifles§ Steyr-Mannlicher M1895§ Karabiner 98kSubmachinegun§ MP 34§ MP 40Machinegun§ MG 08§ MG 30§ MG 34CanadaHandguns§ Enfield revolver§ Browning Hi-Power§ Smith & Wesson Model 10Rifles§ Lee-Enfield SMLE§ Pattern 1914 Enfield§ Ross rifle (Canadian Navy only)Submachine Guns§ Sten§ Thompson submachine gun§ M50 Reising submachine gun§ M3 grease gunMachine Guns§ Bren light machine gun§ Lewis Gun§ M1941 Johnson machine gun§ Vickers machine gunAnti-tank weapons§ Boys anti-tank rifle§ PIATChinaList of National Revolutionary Army weapons, including warlords and Communists.Handguns§ Mauser C96 (Chinese Copy)§ Browning Hi-Power (Burma Campaign X-Forces and Y-Forces)§ Tokarev TT-30/TT-33 Chinese copy§ FN M1900 (Chinese copy)§ Nambu Pistol (captured from Japanese forces)§ Luger P08§ Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless (Issued to officers only)§ Nagant M1895Rifles§ Type 24 rifle-main battle rifle (Chinese licensed copy of Gewehr 98)§ Hanyang Type 88§ Mosin-Nagant M1891/30, M1938, M1944§ Mauser Karabiner 98k (mainly given to the early German trained divisions)§ Gewehr 98§ Browning Automatic Rifle (U.S Lend Lease)§ Mondragón rifle§ ZH-29§ Vz. 24§ FN 1924§ SVT-40 (Only used by communist forces)§ Arisaka Type 38 rifle, Type 44 carbine, and Type 99 rifle (captured from Japanese forces)§ M1 Garand (U.S Lend Lease)§ M1 Carbine (U.S Lend Lease)§ Springfield M1903 (U.S Lend Lease)Submachine Guns§ MP18§ M3 submachine gun (U.S Lend Lease)§ Thompson SMG (U.S Lend Lease and locally produced Chinese copies)§ Sten§ PPSh-41 (Only used by communist forces)§ PPS (Only used by communist forces)§ Type 100 submachine gun (captured from Japanese forces)§ United Defense M42 (U.S Lend Lease and locally produced Chinese copies)Light Machine Guns§ ZB vz.26 (purchased in large quantity from former Czechoslovakia, later local produced Chinese copies)§ ZB-30§ Browning M1919 Medium Machine Gun (U.S Lend Lease)§ MG34 (Chinese copy)§ Bren LMG§ Degtyaryov machine gun (Only used by communist forces)§ Type 11 light machine gun (captured from Japanese forces)§ Type 96 light machine gun (captured from Japanese forces)§ Type 99 light machine gun (captured from Japanese forces)§ FM-24/29Heavy Machine Guns'§ Chinese Type 24 Heavy Machine Gun (Chinese copy of MG 08)§ Browning M1917 (locally produced copies chambered for 7.92mm Mauser rounds)[1]§ PM M1910Anti-Tank weapons§ Boys anti tank rifle§ PTRDGrenades§ Model 24 grenade (Chinese copy)Close quarters weapons§ Dadao§ Miao dao§ HY1935 bayonet§ Qiang (spear)§ Type 30 bayonet (captured from Japanese forces)CzechoslovakiaHandguns§ ČZ vz. 38§ Pistole vz. 22§ ČZ vz. 27§ Pistole vz. 24Rifles§ vz. 24§ vz. 33§ ZH-29Sub Machine Guns§ ZK-383Machine Guns§ ZB vz. 26§ ZB-30§ ZB-50§ ZB-53EstoniaHandguns§ Browning Hi-Power§ Nagant M1895Rifles§ Lee-Enfield§ Mosin-NagantMachineguns§ PM M1910§ Madsen machine gunSubmachine guns§ Arsenal submachine gun§ Suomi KP/-31DenmarkHandguns§ Bergmann-Bayard pistol M10Rifles§ Gevær M/89Submachine guns§ Sten§ Lettet-Forsøgs submachine gunMachine Guns§ Madsen machine gun1. M242. M29FinlandHandguns§ Lahti L-35§ Luger pistol Used by the Finnish officers§ Ruby pistolRifles§ Mosin-Nagant variants§ M28 rifle a.k.a. Pystykorva§ M39 rifle a.k.a. Ukko-Pekka§ Carcano Special variant with rifle grenadesSubmachine Guns§ Suomi KP/-31§ PPSh-41 Russian Lend Lease while during Lapland WarMachine Guns§ Lahti-Saloranta M/26§ Maxim M/32-33§ DP machine gun§ Kg/1940 Light machine gun (Used by the Swedish volunteers)Anti-tank weapons§ Lahti L-39§ Boys anti-tank rifle§ Panzerschreck§ Panzerfaust§ Solothurn S-18/100§ 25 mm Hotchkiss anti-tank gunGrenades§ Molotov cocktail§ Model 24Anti-aircraft weapons§ 7,62 ITKK 31 VKT§ 20 ITK 40 VKTFranceHandguns§ Mle 1935§ MAB Model D pistol§ Star Model 14§ Browning M1910Rifles§ MAS-36§ Berthier rifle§ Lebel Model 1886 rifle§ Berthier carbine§ Fusil Automatique Modele 1917Submachine Guns§ MAS-38§ Thompson M1928§ Sten§ Ribeyrolle 1918 automatic carbineMachine Guns§ FM-24/29§ Hotchkiss M1914§ Hotchkiss M1922 machine gun§ Reibel machine gun§ MAC 1934§ Darne machine gun§ M1918 Browning Automatic RifleGrenade§ F1 grenade (France)Nazi GermanyHandguns§ Walther P38§ Luger P08§ Walther PP, PPK§ Sauer 38H§ Mauser HSC§ Dreyse M1907 - late war use as emergency measure§ Mauser C96§ VolkspistoleRifles§ Gewehr 41§ Gewehr 43§ Mauser Karabiner 98k§ Gewehr 98Submachine Guns§ MP 18/MP 28§ MP 34§ MP 35§ MP 40§ MP 3008 (10,000) - use in 1945 onlyMachine Guns§ MG 08§ MG 13 - second line units later in war§ MG 15 (about 18,000)§ MG 17§ MG 30§ MG 34§ MG 42Automatic Rifles§ Sturmgewehr 44§ FG-42§ StG 45(M)§ Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 (possibly 10,000 of all designs)Sniper Rifles§ Gewehr 43 (scoped)§ Gewehr 98 (scoped)§ Karabiner 98k (scoped)Shotguns§ M30 Luftwaffe drillingAnti-tank Weapons§ Panzerfaust§ Panzerschreck (approx 290,000)§ Panzerbüchse 38 & Panzerbüchse 39§ 8.8 cm Raketenwerfer 43 (3,000)Flamethrowers§ Flammenwerfer 35§ Einstossflammenwerfer 46§ Flammenwerfer 41Grenades§ Model 24 Stielhandgranate Offensive Hand Grenade§ Model 43 Stielhandgranate Offensive Hand Grenade§ Model 39 Eiergranate Hand Grenade§ Splitterring§ S-mine (anti-personnel mine)Close quarter weapons§ Kampfmesser 42§ S84/98 III Bayonet§ Luftwaffe SwordGreeceHandguns§ Ruby pistolRifles§ Lee Enfield§ M1 Garand§ Mannlicher-Schönauer§ Gras rifleSubmachine Gun§ Thompson submachine gunMachine Gun§ Schwarzlose MG M.07/12§ Modified Hotchkiss machine gun§ EPK (Pyrkal) Machine gun§ Saint Etienne Machine-GunHungaryHandguns§ FÉG 37M Pistol§ Frommer Stop§ FÉG 29M§ Frommer Lilliput§ 20M flare pistol§ 42M flare pistol§ 43M flare pistolRifles§ 35M rifle§ 43M rifle§ Steyr-Mannlicher M1895§ 95M Mannlicher§ 31M rifle§ 30M rifle§ 38M rifleSubmachine Guns§ Danuvia 39M§ Danuvia 43MMachine Guns§ Solothurn 31M light MG§ Schwarzlose 7/31M heavy MG§ Madsel LMG (Madsen golyószóró)§ 1934M Stange (MG34)§ 1942M Grunov (MG42)§ 42M (MG131)Anti-tank Weapons§ Solothurn 36M 20mm anti-tank rifle (S-18/100)§ Panzerschreck§ Kis Páncélököl (Panzerfaust Klein)§ Nagy Páncélököl (Panzerfaust 30)§ 43M kézi páncéltörő vető (Hungarian bazooka variant)§ 44M kézi páncéltörő vető (Hungarian panzerschreck variant)§ 36M mine§ 43M mineGrenades§ L-28M Goldmann§ 31M Vesiczky§ 36M Vécsey§ 37M Demeter§ 42M Vecsey§ 39A/M fire Grenade (Molotov cocktail)§ 43M smoke grenade§ Lila füstgyertyaItalyHandguns§ Beretta Modello 1934§ Beretta Modello 1935§ Glisenti M1910§ Roth-Steyr M1907Submachine Guns§ Moschetto Automatico Beretta 1938§ OVP (firearm)§ FNAB-43§ TZ-45§ Beretta Model 1918Rifles§ Carcano M1891§ Carcano M1891 Moschetto da Cavalleria (Cavalry Carbine)§ Carcano M1891TS Moschetto per Truppe Speciali (Special Troop Carbine)§ Carcano M1938 Carbine§ Steyr-Mannlicher M1895Machine Guns§ Breda Modello 30§ Fiat-Revelli Modello 1914§ Fiat-Revelli Modello 1935§ Breda Modello 1937Mortars§ Brixia Model 35Hand Grenades§ Bomba a Mano mod.35§ Bomba a Mano mod.42JapanHandguns§ Nambu Type 14§ Type 26§ Nambu Type 94Rifles§ Arisaka§ Type 38 Rifle§ Type 2 Rifle§ Type 38 Cavalry Rifle§ Type 99 Rifle§ Type 97 Sniper Rifle§ Type 44 Cavalry Rifle§ Type I Rifle§ Type 4 rifleSubmachine guns§ Nambu Type 100§ MP18§ Type 2Anti-tank Weapons§ Type 97 20 mm anti-tank rifle§ Lunge AT mineMachine Guns§ Type 11 Light Machine Gun§ Type 96 Light Machine Gun§ Type 97 Light Machine Gun§ Type 99 Light Machine Gun§ Type 92 Heavy Machine Gun§ Type 1 Heavy Machine Gun§ Type 3 Heavy Machine Gun§ Type 4 Heavy Machine GunGrenades§ Type 4 Grenade§ Type 10 Fragmentation Hand/Discharger Grenade§ Type 91 Fragmentation Hand/Discharger Grenade§ Type 97 Fragmentation Hand Grenade§ Type 99 Hand/Rifle Fragmentation GrenadeFlamethrowers§ Type 93 / Type 100Grenade Dischargers§ Type 10§ Type 89Swords§ Shin guntō§ Type 30 bayonetLatviaSubmachine guns§ Arsenal submachine gunMachineguns§ Lewis Gun§ Vickers machine gunLithuaniaHandguns§ M1895 Nagant§ Luger P08 pistolRifles§ Lee-Enfield§ Mosin Nagant§ Mauser 1898Machineguns§ Vickers machine guns§ ZB vz.26§ ZB vz.37§ M1917 Browning machine gun§ PM M1910LuxembourgRifles§ Gewehr 98§ Karabiner 98k§ Pattern 1914§ Ross RifleMachineguns§ MG 08§ Vickers machine gunThe NetherlandsHandguns§ FN Model 1903§ FN Model 1910/22Rifle§ M.95§ Lee EnfieldSubmachine guns§ Lanchester submachine gunMachine Gun§ Schwarzlose MG M.07/12§ Lewis GunNew ZealandHandguns§ Smith & Wesson M&P§ Webley Revolver§ Enfield revolverRifles§ Lee EnfieldSubmachine Guns§ Owen submachine gun§ Thompson submachine gun§ StenMachine guns§ Charlton Automatic Rifle (1500)§ Lewis gun§ Vickers machine gunAnti-tank weapons§ Boys anti-tank rifle§ PIATNorwayHandguns§ Colt M1914§ Nagant M1895§ Lahti L-35 (smuggled from Sweden & Finland)§ Walther P38 (Captured from German forces, used by the resistance)Rifles§ Krag-Jørgensen§ M1917 Enfield (Parachuted to the resistance movement as Military aid)§ Pattern 1914 Enfield (parachuted to the resistance movement as Military aid)§ Lee-Enfield (parachuted to the resistance movement as military aid)§ Karabiner 98k (captured from German forces, used by the Resistance)§ M1 Carbine (Parachuted to the Resistance movement)§ AG-42 (supplied to resistance movement by Sweden)§ Mosin-Nagant (smuggled from Finland & USSR, used by resistance in the North)§ Mas36 (leftover from French forces after the battle of Narvik, used by the resistance)Submachine Guns§ Sten (Used by the post Norwegian Campaign resistance, not the army.)§ MP40 (captured from German forces, used by resistance)§ Thompson M1928A1 (parachuted to the resistance movement as military aid)Machine Guns§ Madsen M/22§ Colt M/29§ Hotchkiss M1914 machine gun§ Browning M1919§ MG34 (captured from German forces,used by the resistance)§ kg/1940 Light machine gun§ Weibel M/1932MongoliaRifles§ Mosin-NagantSubmachineguns§ PPSh-41§ PPS-43Machineguns§ Russian M1910 Maxim§ SG-43 Goryunov§ DShKPolandHandguns§ Nagant M1895§ Radom Pistolet wz.35 Vis§ TT pistol (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East)Rifles§ Kbsp wz. 1938M§ Karabin wz.98a (kb wz.98a)§ Karabinek wz.29 (kbk wz.29)§ rkm Browning wz.1928§ Lee Enfield (Used by the exiled army)§ Mosin-Nagant (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East)Submachine gun§ Bechowiec-1§ Błyskawica (Used by the Polish Resistance)§ KIS (weapon)§ Choroszmanów§ Samoróbka§ Teteryka§ Wz.39§ Sten (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the West)§ PPS (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East§ PPSh-41 (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East)Machine Guns§ Ckm wz.30§ Machine gun Type C§ Bren (Used by the exiled army)§ DP (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East)Anti-Tank Weapons§ Kb ppanc wz.35Grenades§ Fragmentation Grenade wz.1933§ Concussion Grenade wz.1933Flamethrower§ K pattern flamethrower (Used by the polish resistance)Grenade launcher§ Granatnik wz.36Close quarter Weapons§ Lance (Polish Cavalry) secondary weapon close quarters combat§ Szabla (Polish Cavalry) secondary weapon close quarters combatRomaniaHandguns§ Ruby pistol§ Beretta M 1934§ Steyr M1912Rifles§ vz.24§ Karabiner 98k§ Mosin-NagantSubmachine Guns§ Orita M1941§ PPSh 41Machine Guns§ ZB vz. 26§ ZB-30§ MG 34§ PM M1910§ ZB-53South AfricaPistols§ Webley RevolverRifles§ Lee Enfield§ Rieder Automatic Rifle§ Jungle CarbineSubmachine guns§ StenMachine Guns§ Vickers machine gun§ Bren light machine gunAnti-Tank Weapons§ PIAT§ 3.5-inch rocket launcherMortars§ 2-inch mortarSoviet UnionHandguns§ Nagant M1895 revolver§ Tokarev TT-30/TT-33 semiautomatic pistolRifles§ Mosin-Nagant M1891/30, M1938, M1944 bolt-action rifle§ Tokarev SVT-38, SVT-40 semiautomatic rifle§ AVS-36 semiautomatic rifle - taken out of service in 1941§ Fedorov Avtomat automatic rifle§ SKS (semiautomatic rifle, tested in combat in very small numbers at the end of the war)Submachine Guns§ PPD-40§ PPSh-41§ PPS§ MP 40 (captured from German forces)Machine Guns§ DP-28 Light Machine Gun§ DShK 1938 Heavy Machine Gun§ DS-39 - production stopped 1941§ PM M1910 medium machine gun§ SG-43 Goryunov medium machine gun - 1943 onwards§ RPD (used in the last stages of the war)§ MG-42 (captured from German forces)Anti-Tank Weapons§ PTRD-41 Bolt-action Anti-Tank Rifle§ PTRS-41 Semi-Automatic Anti-Tank RifleGrenades§ F1 Fragmentation Hand Grenade§ RGD-33 Fragmentation Hand Grenade§ RG-41 Anti-Tank Hand Grenade§ RG-42 Fragmentation Hand Grenade§ RPG-43 HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) Hand Grenade§ RPG-6 HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) Hand Grenade§ Molotov CocktailFlamethrowers§ ROKS-2§ ROKS-3Sniper Rifles§ Mosin-Nagant M1891/30, M1938, M1944 (scoped)§ Tokarev SVT-38, SVT-40 (scoped)Swords§ ShashkaKnife§ NR-40ThailandRifles§ Type 45 Siamese Mauser§ Type-66 Siamese MauserMachine guns§ Madsen machine gun§ Type 66 Browing HMG§ Type 77 Vickers Armstrong HMG§ Type 92 heavy machine gunUnited KingdomHandguns§ Enfield Revolver No.2 Mk.I§ Webley Mk.VI (.455) & Mk.IV (.38/200)§ FN/Inglis Pistol No.2 Mk.I and Mk 1*§ Smith & Wesson M&P§ Colt M1911A1§ WelrodRifles§ Short Magazine Lee-Enfield§ Rifle No. 5 Mk I§ Pattern 14 (P14) "No.3"§ De Lisle Carbine (Limited to British Commandos)§ M1 carbineSubmachine guns§ Sten - about 4 million produced from all sources§ Lanchester§ Thompson M1928, M1928A1, M1Machine Guns§ Bren light machine gun§ Lewis light machine gun§ Vickers K machine gun§ Vickers machine gun§ Besa machine gun§ M2 Browning machine gunAnti-Tank Weapons§ Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank (PIAT)§ Rifle, Anti-Tank, .55 in, BoysGrenades§ No.36M Mk.I Fragmentation Hand/Rifle Grenade or "Mills Bomb"§ Grenade, Rifle No. 68 AT - HEAT anti-tank rifle grenade§ No.69 Mk.I Bakelite Concussion Hand Grenade§ No.76 Special Incendiary Phosphorus Hand Grenade§ No.73 Anti-Tank Hand Grenade "Thermos Grenade"§ No.74 ST Grenade, or "Sticky Bomb" - an anti-tank hand grenade§ No.75 Anti-Tank Hand Grenade known as "Hawkins Grenade" or "Hawkins Mine"§ No.77 (White Phosphorus) Hand Grenade§ No.82 Hand Grenade - known as "Gammon Grenade/Bomb"Mortars§ 2-inch mortar§ Ordnance ML 3 inch MortarFlamethrowers§ No.II Mk.II Flamethrower "Lifebuoy"Sniper rifles§ Lee-Enfield (scoped)§ Pattern 1914 (scoped)§ M1D Garand (Scoped)Knives§ Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting KnifeUnited StatesHandguns§ Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless§ Colt M1911A1§ Colt M1917 revolver§ Colt Official Police {Colt M1927 Aka "Colt Commando"}§ FP-45 Liberator§ Smith & Wesson M&P§ WelrodRifles§ M1 Garand§ M1 Carbine§ M1903 Springfield§ M1917 Enfield rifle§ M1941 Johnson rifleSubmachine Guns§ Thompson M1928, M1928A1, M1, M1A1§ M3/A1 'Grease Gun'§ M50 Reising submachine gun§ United Defense M42 (15,000)Machine Guns§ Browning M1917A1 Heavy Machine Gun§ Browning M1919 Medium Machine Gun§ Browning M2 Heavy Machine Gun§ M1941 Johnson machine gun§ Lewis gun§ M1918 Browning Automatic RifleSniper Rifles§ M1 Garand (scoped)§ M1903 Springfield (scoped)§ M1917 Enfield (scoped)Shotgun (Commonly used by the Marines in the Pacific theater, limited use in Europe)§ Ithaca 37§ Trench gun M1897 (Used in the Western front)§ M12 Shotgun§ Browning Auto-5§ Coach gun§ Remington 31Anti-Tank Weapons§ Rocket Launcher, M1/A1 "Bazooka"§ M18 recoilless rifleFlamethrowers§ M2 flamethrower§ M1A1 FlamethrowerGrenades§ Mk.2 Fragmentation Hand GrenadeGrenade launcher§ M7 grenade launcherMortars§ M1 Mortar§ M2 4.2 inch mortar§ M2 MortarKnife§ Ka-Bar§ M1 bayonet§ M1905 bayonet§ M1942 bayonet§ Mark I trench knife§ V-42 Stiletto§ United States Marine Raider StilettoKingdom of YugoslaviaHandguns§ Ruby pistol§ FN Model 1910 (Also the 1922 was used)Rifles§ M24 series§ Mauser 98§ Kbk wz. 1929§ vz. 24§ SteyrSubmachinegun§ Erma EMP-35Machineguns§ Chauchat§ Fiat-Revelli Modello 1914§ ZB vz. 26Grenades§ Vasić M.12 modelAlbaniaHandguns§ Glisenti Model 1910Rifles§ Carcano§ Mannlicher-Schönauer§ Mosin-NagantSubmachineguns§ Beretta Model 1918Machineguns§ Schwarzlose MG M.07/12§ Vickers machine gunAustriaHandguns§ Steyr M1912Rifles§ Steyr-Mannlicher M1895Submachinegunns§ MP 34Machineguns§ MG 30§ Schwarzlose MG M.07/12AustraliaHandguns§ Webley Mk.VI (.455) & Mk.IV (.38/200)§ Enfield revolver§ Browning Hi-PowerRifles§ Lee-Enfield§ Rifle No. 5 Mk I§ Charlton Automatic RifleSubmachine Guns§ Owen§ Austen submachine gun§ Thompson M1928A1§ StenMachine guns§ Lewis Gun§ Bren light machine gun§ Vickers machine gunAnti-Tank weapons§ PIAT§ Boys anti-tank rifleBelgiumHandguns§ Nagant M1895§ FN Model 1910/22Rifles§ Mauser M1936 (similar to Mauser 98)Machine Guns§ Maxim Mo8§ M1918 Browning Automatic RifleBrazilHandguns§ Colt M1917 revolver§ Colt M1911Rifles§ Mauser M1908 (similar to Gewehr 98)§ vz.24§ M1 Garand (U.S Lend Lease)§ M1 Carbine (U.S Lend Lease)§ Springfield M1903 (U.S Lend Lease)Submachine Guns§ Thompson submachine gun(U.S Lend Lease)§ M3 grease gun(U.S Lend Lease)Machine guns§ Browning M1919(U.S Lend Lease)§ Hotchkiss M1914§ M1941 Johnson machine gun(U.S Lend Lease)BulgariaHandguns§ Luger P08 pistolRifles§ Steyr-Mannlicher M1895§ Karabiner 98kSubmachinegun§ MP 34§ MP 40Machinegun§ MG 08§ MG 30§ MG 34CanadaHandguns§ Enfield revolver§ Browning Hi-Power§ Smith & Wesson Model 10Rifles§ Lee-Enfield SMLE§ Pattern 1914 Enfield§ Ross rifle (Canadian Navy only)Submachine Guns§ Sten§ Thompson submachine gun§ M50 Reising submachine gun§ M3 grease gunMachine Guns§ Bren light machine gun§ Lewis Gun§ M1941 Johnson machine gun§ Vickers machine gunAnti-tank weapons§ Boys anti-tank rifle§ PIATChinaList of National Revolutionary Army weapons, including warlords and Communists.Handguns§ Mauser C96 (Chinese Copy)§ Browning Hi-Power (Burma Campaign X-Forces and Y-Forces)§ Tokarev TT-30/TT-33 Chinese copy§ FN M1900 (Chinese copy)§ Nambu Pistol (captured from Japanese forces)§ Luger P08§ Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless (Issued to officers only)§ Nagant M1895Rifles§ Type 24 rifle-main battle rifle (Chinese licensed copy of Gewehr 98)§ Hanyang Type 88§ Mosin-Nagant M1891/30, M1938, M1944§ Mauser Karabiner 98k (mainly given to the early German trained divisions)§ Gewehr 98§ Browning Automatic Rifle (U.S Lend Lease)§ Mondragón rifle§ ZH-29§ Vz. 24§ FN 1924§ SVT-40 (Only used by communist forces)§ Arisaka Type 38 rifle, Type 44 carbine, and Type 99 rifle (captured from Japanese forces)§ M1 Garand (U.S Lend Lease)§ M1 Carbine (U.S Lend Lease)§ Springfield M1903 (U.S Lend Lease)Submachine Guns§ MP18§ M3 submachine gun (U.S Lend Lease)§ Thompson SMG (U.S Lend Lease and locally produced Chinese copies)§ Sten§ PPSh-41 (Only used by communist forces)§ PPS (Only used by communist forces)§ Type 100 submachine gun (captured from Japanese forces)§ United Defense M42 (U.S Lend Lease and locally produced Chinese copies)Light Machine Guns§ ZB vz.26 (purchased in large quantity from former Czechoslovakia, later local produced Chinese copies)§ ZB-30§ Browning M1919 Medium Machine Gun (U.S Lend Lease)§ MG34 (Chinese copy)§ Bren LMG§ Degtyaryov machine gun (Only used by communist forces)§ Type 11 light machine gun (captured from Japanese forces)§ Type 96 light machine gun (captured from Japanese forces)§ Type 99 light machine gun (captured from Japanese forces)§ FM-24/29Heavy Machine Guns'§ Chinese Type 24 Heavy Machine Gun (Chinese copy of MG 08)§ Browning M1917 (locally produced copies chambered for 7.92mm Mauser rounds)[1]§ PM M1910Anti-Tank weapons§ Boys anti tank rifle§ PTRDGrenades§ Model 24 grenade (Chinese copy)Close quarters weapons§ Dadao§ Miao dao§ HY1935 bayonet§ Qiang (spear)§ Type 30 bayonet (captured from Japanese forces)CzechoslovakiaHandguns§ ČZ vz. 38§ Pistole vz. 22§ ČZ vz. 27§ Pistole vz. 24Rifles§ vz. 24§ vz. 33§ ZH-29Sub Machine Guns§ ZK-383Machine Guns§ ZB vz. 26§ ZB-30§ ZB-50§ ZB-53EstoniaHandguns§ Browning Hi-Power§ Nagant M1895Rifles§ Lee-Enfield§ Mosin-NagantMachineguns§ PM M1910§ Madsen machine gunSubmachine guns§ Arsenal submachine gun§ Suomi KP/-31DenmarkHandguns§ Bergmann-Bayard pistol M10Rifles§ Gevær M/89Submachine guns§ Sten§ Lettet-Forsøgs submachine gunMachine Guns§ Madsen machine gun1. M242. M29FinlandHandguns§ Lahti L-35§ Luger pistol Used by the Finnish officers§ Ruby pistolRifles§ Mosin-Nagant variants§ M28 rifle a.k.a. Pystykorva§ M39 rifle a.k.a. Ukko-Pekka§ Carcano Special variant with rifle grenadesSubmachine Guns§ Suomi KP/-31§ PPSh-41 Russian Lend Lease while during Lapland WarMachine Guns§ Lahti-Saloranta M/26§ Maxim M/32-33§ DP machine gun§ Kg/1940 Light machine gun (Used by the Swedish volunteers)Anti-tank weapons§ Lahti L-39§ Boys anti-tank rifle§ Panzerschreck§ Panzerfaust§ Solothurn S-18/100§ 25 mm Hotchkiss anti-tank gunGrenades§ Molotov cocktail§ Model 24Anti-aircraft weapons§ 7,62 ITKK 31 VKT§ 20 ITK 40 VKTFranceHandguns§ Mle 1935§ MAB Model D pistol§ Star Model 14§ Browning M1910Rifles§ MAS-36§ Berthier rifle§ Lebel Model 1886 rifle§ Berthier carbine§ Fusil Automatique Modele 1917Submachine Guns§ MAS-38§ Thompson M1928§ Sten§ Ribeyrolle 1918 automatic carbineMachine Guns§ FM-24/29§ Hotchkiss M1914§ Hotchkiss M1922 machine gun§ Reibel machine gun§ MAC 1934§ Darne machine gun§ M1918 Browning Automatic RifleGrenade§ F1 grenade (France)Nazi GermanyHandguns§ Walther P38§ Luger P08§ Walther PP, PPK§ Sauer 38H§ Mauser HSC§ Dreyse M1907 - late war use as emergency measure§ Mauser C96§ VolkspistoleRifles§ Gewehr 41§ Gewehr 43§ Mauser Karabiner 98k§ Gewehr 98Submachine Guns§ MP 18/MP 28§ MP 34§ MP 35§ MP 40§ MP 3008 (10,000) - use in 1945 onlyMachine Guns§ MG 08§ MG 13 - second line units later in war§ MG 15 (about 18,000)§ MG 17§ MG 30§ MG 34§ MG 42Automatic Rifles§ Sturmgewehr 44§ FG-42§ StG 45(M)§ Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 (possibly 10,000 of all designs)Sniper Rifles§ Gewehr 43 (scoped)§ Gewehr 98 (scoped)§ Karabiner 98k (scoped)Shotguns§ M30 Luftwaffe drillingAnti-tank Weapons§ Panzerfaust§ Panzerschreck (approx 290,000)§ Panzerbüchse 38 & Panzerbüchse 39§ 8.8 cm Raketenwerfer 43 (3,000)Flamethrowers§ Flammenwerfer 35§ Einstossflammenwerfer 46§ Flammenwerfer 41Grenades§ Model 24 Stielhandgranate Offensive Hand Grenade§ Model 43 Stielhandgranate Offensive Hand Grenade§ Model 39 Eiergranate Hand Grenade§ Splitterring§ S-mine (anti-personnel mine)Close quarter weapons§ Kampfmesser 42§ S84/98 III Bayonet§ Luftwaffe SwordGreeceHandguns§ Ruby pistolRifles§ Lee Enfield§ M1 Garand§ Mannlicher-Schönauer§ Gras rifleSubmachine Gun§ Thompson submachine gunMachine Gun§ Schwarzlose MG M.07/12§ Modified Hotchkiss machine gun§ EPK (Pyrkal) Machine gun§ Saint Etienne Machine-GunHungaryHandguns§ FÉG 37M Pistol§ Frommer Stop§ FÉG 29M§ Frommer Lilliput§ 20M flare pistol§ 42M flare pistol§ 43M flare pistolRifles§ 35M rifle§ 43M rifle§ Steyr-Mannlicher M1895§ 95M Mannlicher§ 31M rifle§ 30M rifle§ 38M rifleSubmachine Guns§ Danuvia 39M§ Danuvia 43MMachine Guns§ Solothurn 31M light MG§ Schwarzlose 7/31M heavy MG§ Madsel LMG (Madsen golyószóró)§ 1934M Stange (MG34)§ 1942M Grunov (MG42)§ 42M (MG131)Anti-tank Weapons§ Solothurn 36M 20mm anti-tank rifle (S-18/100)§ Panzerschreck§ Kis Páncélököl (Panzerfaust Klein)§ Nagy Páncélököl (Panzerfaust 30)§ 43M kézi páncéltörő vető (Hungarian bazooka variant)§ 44M kézi páncéltörő vető (Hungarian panzerschreck variant)§ 36M mine§ 43M mineGrenades§ L-28M Goldmann§ 31M Vesiczky§ 36M Vécsey§ 37M Demeter§ 42M Vecsey§ 39A/M fire Grenade (Molotov cocktail)§ 43M smoke grenade§ Lila füstgyertyaItalyHandguns§ Beretta Modello 1934§ Beretta Modello 1935§ Glisenti M1910§ Roth-Steyr M1907Submachine Guns§ Moschetto Automatico Beretta 1938§ OVP (firearm)§ FNAB-43§ TZ-45§ Beretta Model 1918Rifles§ Carcano M1891§ Carcano M1891 Moschetto da Cavalleria (Cavalry Carbine)§ Carcano M1891TS Moschetto per Truppe Speciali (Special Troop Carbine)§ Carcano M1938 Carbine§ Steyr-Mannlicher M1895Machine Guns§ Breda Modello 30§ Fiat-Revelli Modello 1914§ Fiat-Revelli Modello 1935§ Breda Modello 1937Mortars§ Brixia Model 35Hand Grenades§ Bomba a Mano mod.35§ Bomba a Mano mod.42JapanHandguns§ Nambu Type 14§ Type 26§ Nambu Type 94Rifles§ Arisaka§ Type 38 Rifle§ Type 2 Rifle§ Type 38 Cavalry Rifle§ Type 99 Rifle§ Type 97 Sniper Rifle§ Type 44 Cavalry Rifle§ Type I Rifle§ Type 4 rifleSubmachine guns§ Nambu Type 100§ MP18§ Type 2Anti-tank Weapons§ Type 97 20 mm anti-tank rifle§ Lunge AT mineMachine Guns§ Type 11 Light Machine Gun§ Type 96 Light Machine Gun§ Type 97 Light Machine Gun§ Type 99 Light Machine Gun§ Type 92 Heavy Machine Gun§ Type 1 Heavy Machine Gun§ Type 3 Heavy Machine Gun§ Type 4 Heavy Machine GunGrenades§ Type 4 Grenade§ Type 10 Fragmentation Hand/Discharger Grenade§ Type 91 Fragmentation Hand/Discharger Grenade§ Type 97 Fragmentation Hand Grenade§ Type 99 Hand/Rifle Fragmentation GrenadeFlamethrowers§ Type 93 / Type 100Grenade Dischargers§ Type 10§ Type 89Swords§ Shin guntō§ Type 30 bayonetLatviaSubmachine guns§ Arsenal submachine gunMachineguns§ Lewis Gun§ Vickers machine gunLithuaniaHandguns§ M1895 Nagant§ Luger P08 pistolRifles§ Lee-Enfield§ Mosin Nagant§ Mauser 1898Machineguns§ Vickers machine guns§ ZB vz.26§ ZB vz.37§ M1917 Browning machine gun§ PM M1910LuxembourgRifles§ Gewehr 98§ Karabiner 98k§ Pattern 1914§ Ross RifleMachineguns§ MG 08§ Vickers machine gunThe NetherlandsHandguns§ FN Model 1903§ FN Model 1910/22Rifle§ M.95§ Lee EnfieldSubmachine guns§ Lanchester submachine gunMachine Gun§ Schwarzlose MG M.07/12§ Lewis GunNew ZealandHandguns§ Smith & Wesson M&P§ Webley Revolver§ Enfield revolverRifles§ Lee EnfieldSubmachine Guns§ Owen submachine gun§ Thompson submachine gun§ StenMachine guns§ Charlton Automatic Rifle (1500)§ Lewis gun§ Vickers machine gunAnti-tank weapons§ Boys anti-tank rifle§ PIATNorwayHandguns§ Colt M1914§ Nagant M1895§ Lahti L-35 (smuggled from Sweden & Finland)§ Walther P38 (Captured from German forces, used by the resistance)Rifles§ Krag-Jørgensen§ M1917 Enfield (Parachuted to the resistance movement as Military aid)§ Pattern 1914 Enfield (parachuted to the resistance movement as Military aid)§ Lee-Enfield (parachuted to the resistance movement as military aid)§ Karabiner 98k (captured from German forces, used by the Resistance)§ M1 Carbine (Parachuted to the Resistance movement)§ AG-42 (supplied to resistance movement by Sweden)§ Mosin-Nagant (smuggled from Finland & USSR, used by resistance in the North)§ Mas36 (leftover from French forces after the battle of Narvik, used by the resistance)Submachine Guns§ Sten (Used by the post Norwegian Campaign resistance, not the army.)§ MP40 (captured from German forces, used by resistance)§ Thompson M1928A1 (parachuted to the resistance movement as military aid)Machine Guns§ Madsen M/22§ Colt M/29§ Hotchkiss M1914 machine gun§ Browning M1919§ MG34 (captured from German forces,used by the resistance)§ kg/1940 Light machine gun§ Weibel M/1932MongoliaRifles§ Mosin-NagantSubmachineguns§ PPSh-41§ PPS-43Machineguns§ Russian M1910 Maxim§ SG-43 Goryunov§ DShKPolandHandguns§ Nagant M1895§ Radom Pistolet wz.35 Vis§ TT pistol (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East)Rifles§ Kbsp wz. 1938M§ Karabin wz.98a (kb wz.98a)§ Karabinek wz.29 (kbk wz.29)§ rkm Browning wz.1928§ Lee Enfield (Used by the exiled army)§ Mosin-Nagant (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East)Submachine gun§ Bechowiec-1§ Błyskawica (Used by the Polish Resistance)§ KIS (weapon)§ Choroszmanów§ Samoróbka§ Teteryka§ Wz.39§ Sten (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the West)§ PPS (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East§ PPSh-41 (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East)Machine Guns§ Ckm wz.30§ Machine gun Type C§ Bren (Used by the exiled army)§ DP (Used by Polish Armed Forces in the East)Anti-Tank Weapons§ Kb ppanc wz.35Grenades§ Fragmentation Grenade wz.1933§ Concussion Grenade wz.1933Flamethrower§ K pattern flamethrower (Used by the polish resistance)Grenade launcher§ Granatnik wz.36Close quarter Weapons§ Lance (Polish Cavalry) secondary weapon close quarters combat§ Szabla (Polish Cavalry) secondary weapon close quarters combatRomaniaHandguns§ Ruby pistol§ Beretta M 1934§ Steyr M1912Rifles§ vz.24§ Karabiner 98k§ Mosin-NagantSubmachine Guns§ Orita M1941§ PPSh 41Machine Guns§ ZB vz. 26§ ZB-30§ MG 34§ PM M1910§ ZB-53South AfricaPistols§ Webley RevolverRifles§ Lee Enfield§ Rieder Automatic Rifle§ Jungle CarbineSubmachine guns§ StenMachine Guns§ Vickers machine gun§ Bren light machine gunAnti-Tank Weapons§ PIAT§ 3.5-inch rocket launcherMortars§ 2-inch mortarSoviet UnionHandguns§ Nagant M1895 revolver§ Tokarev TT-30/TT-33 semiautomatic pistolRifles§ Mosin-Nagant M1891/30, M1938, M1944 bolt-action rifle§ Tokarev SVT-38, SVT-40 semiautomatic rifle§ AVS-36 semiautomatic rifle - taken out of service in 1941§ Fedorov Avtomat automatic rifle§ SKS (semiautomatic rifle, tested in combat in very small numbers at the end of the war)Submachine Guns§ PPD-40§ PPSh-41§ PPS§ MP 40 (captured from German forces)Machine Guns§ DP-28 Light Machine Gun§ DShK 1938 Heavy Machine Gun§ DS-39 - production stopped 1941§ PM M1910 medium machine gun§ SG-43 Goryunov medium machine gun - 1943 onwards§ RPD (used in the last stages of the war)§ MG-42 (captured from German forces)Anti-Tank Weapons§ PTRD-41 Bolt-action Anti-Tank Rifle§ PTRS-41 Semi-Automatic Anti-Tank RifleGrenades§ F1 Fragmentation Hand Grenade§ RGD-33 Fragmentation Hand Grenade§ RG-41 Anti-Tank Hand Grenade§ RG-42 Fragmentation Hand Grenade§ RPG-43 HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) Hand Grenade§ RPG-6 HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) Hand Grenade§ Molotov CocktailFlamethrowers§ ROKS-2§ ROKS-3Sniper Rifles§ Mosin-Nagant M1891/30, M1938, M1944 (scoped)§ Tokarev SVT-38, SVT-40 (scoped)Swords§ ShashkaKnife§ NR-40ThailandRifles§ Type 45 Siamese Mauser§ Type-66 Siamese MauserMachine guns§ Madsen machine gun§ Type 66 Browing HMG§ Type 77 Vickers Armstrong HMG§ Type 92 heavy machine gunUnited KingdomHandguns§ Enfield Revolver No.2 Mk.I§ Webley Mk.VI (.455) & Mk.IV (.38/200)§ FN/Inglis Pistol No.2 Mk.I and Mk 1*§ Smith & Wesson M&P§ Colt M1911A1§ WelrodRifles§ Short Magazine Lee-Enfield§ Rifle No. 5 Mk I§ Pattern 14 (P14) "No.3"§ De Lisle Carbine (Limited to British Commandos)§ M1 carbineSubmachine guns§ Sten - about 4 million produced from all sources§ Lanchester§ Thompson M1928, M1928A1, M1Machine Guns§ Bren light machine gun§ Lewis light machine gun§ Vickers K machine gun§ Vickers machine gun§ Besa machine gun§ M2 Browning machine gunAnti-Tank Weapons§ Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank (PIAT)§ Rifle, Anti-Tank, .55 in, BoysGrenades§ No.36M Mk.I Fragmentation Hand/Rifle Grenade or "Mills Bomb"§ Grenade, Rifle No. 68 AT - HEAT anti-tank rifle grenade§ No.69 Mk.I Bakelite Concussion Hand Grenade§ No.76 Special Incendiary Phosphorus Hand Grenade§ No.73 Anti-Tank Hand Grenade "Thermos Grenade"§ No.74 ST Grenade, or "Sticky Bomb" - an anti-tank hand grenade§ No.75 Anti-Tank Hand Grenade known as "Hawkins Grenade" or "Hawkins Mine"§ No.77 (White Phosphorus) Hand Grenade§ No.82 Hand Grenade - known as "Gammon Grenade/Bomb"Mortars§ 2-inch mortar§ Ordnance ML 3 inch MortarFlamethrowers§ No.II Mk.II Flamethrower "Lifebuoy"Sniper rifles§ Lee-Enfield (scoped)§ Pattern 1914 (scoped)§ M1D Garand (Scoped)Knives§ Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting KnifeUnited StatesHandguns§ Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless§ Colt M1911A1§ Colt M1917 revolver§ Colt Official Police {Colt M1927 Aka "Colt Commando"}§ FP-45 Liberator§ Smith & Wesson M&P§ WelrodRifles§ M1 Garand§ M1 Carbine§ M1903 Springfield§ M1917 Enfield rifle§ M1941 Johnson rifleSubmachine Guns§ Thompson M1928, M1928A1, M1, M1A1§ M3/A1 'Grease Gun'§ M50 Reising submachine gun§ United Defense M42 (15,000)Machine Guns§ Browning M1917A1 Heavy Machine Gun§ Browning M1919 Medium Machine Gun§ Browning M2 Heavy Machine Gun§ M1941 Johnson machine gun§ Lewis gun§ M1918 Browning Automatic RifleSniper Rifles§ M1 Garand (scoped)§ M1903 Springfield (scoped)§ M1917 Enfield (scoped)Shotgun (Commonly used by the Marines in the Pacific theater, limited use in Europe)§ Ithaca 37§ Trench gun M1897 (Used in the Western front)§ M12 Shotgun§ Browning Auto-5§ Coach gun§ Remington 31Anti-Tank Weapons§ Rocket Launcher, M1/A1 "Bazooka"§ M18 recoilless rifleFlamethrowers§ M2 flamethrower§ M1A1 FlamethrowerGrenades§ Mk.2 Fragmentation Hand GrenadeGrenade launcher§ M7 grenade launcherMortars§ M1 Mortar§ M2 4.2 inch mortar§ M2 MortarKnife§ Ka-Bar§ M1 bayonet§ M1905 bayonet§ M1942 bayonet§ Mark I trench knife§ V-42 Stiletto§ United States Marine Raider StilettoKingdom of YugoslaviaHandguns§ Ruby pistol§ FN Model 1910 (Also the 1922 was used)Rifles§ M24 series§ Mauser 98§ Kbk wz. 1929§ vz. 24§ SteyrSubmachinegun§ Erma EMP-35Machineguns§ Chauchat§ Fiat-Revelli Modello 1914§ ZB vz. 26Grenades§ Vasić M.12 model