answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2008-07-21 19:22:20
2008-07-21 19:22:20

High School diploma or Equivalent

001
🦃
0
🤨
0
😮
0
😂
0

Related Questions


California High School Proficiency Exam (Diploma Equivalent to your High School Diploma)


You would not have to have a high school diploma to be a baker, but having a high school diploma might mean the difference between a company hiring or not hiring you.


High school graduation required, but if you did not graduate from high school but got a GED instead they will accept that in place of a high school diploma.


Online high schools and the diploma they offer are as real as traditional high school diploma. Being an online high school does not mean that academic certifications awarded by the school are unreal in any way. Alford is an accredited high school, which means that the diploma they offer is real and it follows the same guidelines and quality standards as traditional high schools.


You mean a college degree? I don't think so. Most colleges require a high school diploma or GED.


Online High Schools and the diploma offered by McHill high school are just as real as traditional high school diploma. Being an online high school does not mean that academic certifications awarded by the school are unreal in any way. In fact online schools go through the same procedure of accreditation that traditional schools go through, and they follow the same guidelines and quality standards as traditional campus based education providers.


I got my high school diploma from Belford and I am now enrolled in local community college, while also working part time. I don't know what you mean by doing well but since getting my high school diploma my life has changed significantly.


The diploma offered by Mcford high school is as real as a traditional high school diploma. Being an online high school does not mean that academic certifications awarded by the school are unreal in any way. The online schools go through the same process of evaluation for accreditation that traditional schools go through. They have to maintain quality standards and follow the same guidelines.


Yes that's just wrong I mean u hava earn it


if you mean a HS diploma, it depends on the Culinary School. My school you needed one, or a GED.


No. A high school diploma or a GED doesn't have anything to do with being emancipated. Emancipation is not related to education.


Answer 1: Yes. But make sure that if you do sign up for an online school that it is creditable and does not give fake diplomas. How reliable is the diploma, I mean if you take the diploma will people hire you or will Universities and colleges still accept your diploma? yesAnswer 2: Answer 1 is quite confusing. Let me see if I can clear things up.The simple answer is "yes," you can get your high school diploma entirely online. However, there's a caveat; and that caveat, simply, is that you must make sure that the online high school is "regionally" accredited......meaning accredited by one of the United States's six big "regional" accreditors that are approved by the US Department of Education (USDE).It matters, not, whether the high school diploma is earned in a traditional classroom, or online, as long as the high school -- whichever kind it is -- is "regionally" accredited. Period. It's as simple as that.As long as the online high school is "regionally" accredited (and you must independently verify that; never take the high school's word for it, because the "diploma mills" will lie), then its diploma is exactly the same, and may be used for the exact same purposes as any local, community, city or county public school system in-classroom high school's diploma.The trick, simply, is to ensure that the high school -- no matter what kind it is -- is "regionally" accredited.That's the long and short of it.


Yes. The GED is considered just as qualifying as the high school diploma. They both mean the same level of proficiency has been attained.


Assuming you mean a bachelor's degree... in the US it is at least 120 credit hours of higher education (above a high school diploma).


Ashworth College's high school is named "James Madison High School," and it is accredited by one of the six big "regional" accreditors approved by the US Department of Education (USDE). Therefore, James Madison High School's diploma is accepted by absolutely everyone and everything for which a high school diploma is required.Every traditional, in-classroom public K-12 school in America, in every local school district, in every city/county and state, is accredited by one of the six big US "regional" accreditors... exactly the same kind of "regional" accreditation that Ashworth's James Madison High School has. And I mean exactly the same!Therefore, Ashworth's James Madison High School's diploma is accepted exactly the same as any town's local community high school's diploma. It matters not whether the diploma was earned online or in the classroom. All that matters, with it comes to high school diplomas, is that they're from "regionally" (not "nationally," but "regionally") accredited high schools. Period.Simple as that.


Getting into a Nursing program does not depend on your high school diploma alone. If you fail to get into a nursing program then it does not mean that your school diploma is fake, may be you don't have required GPA, or may be the nursing school doesn't like your essay, there could be a number of reasons. Improve your overall admission application and you will get into a nursing program.


It is possible but more difficult, due to the military's cut backs in enlistment to enlist with a GED, but some parts such as special forces and heavy demolitions require a high school diploma.what do you mean by "just equivalent"


Thirteen years, if you include kindergarten. Or do you mean like how long does it take in the mail or something?


A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.A diploma in Roman times did not mean graduating from school as it does today. A diploma was issued to the auxiliaries upon their completion of service, stating that they were citizens and many times stating the benefits to their families.


Yeah they are accredited through the Nation Home School Accreditation of America (NHSAA). The NHSAA is one of the largest organizations that accredits home schools ad private schools across the country. All public colleges recognized this accreditation and will accept a diploma accredited through the NHSAA. HOWEVER, some colleges require "Regional Accreditation" and will not accept your diploma. Please be careful when selecting an online high school diploma. If you plan on getting your high school diploma online, check with your prospective colleges to make sure they will accept it. Many college applicants end up spending hundreds of dollars then have to also spend additional money to take the GED. Just becuase a high school or college states, "we are accredited" does not mean they have the right accreditation.


Yes and no, it doesn't say it offers a GED it says it gives you a diploma. The catch is is doesn't say what its a diploma to, therefore they can say that. I could say you get could a diploma from me and it would be legit, the reason is becasue it doesn't mean anything it dont say what its a diploma to.... Its not a GED but its a diploma for doing nothing other than giving 200 bucks to a trick. dont buy!


No! The classes are easy and you can use the diploma if you plan on working minimum wage your whole life. HOWEVER, if you plan on going to college or getting a real job, the diploma is no good. They are a class 3 school, and their diploma's are accredited but that does not mean anyone will accept them. No college or high paying job will take it. DO NOT WASTE YOUR TIME!


Well, just because you don't have a high school diploma doesn't mean you can't be hired to the same job as someone with a dimploma. If employers see hope in you, they can hire you. However, without a diploma it is much harder to find work. Local stores, fast food chains, or something along those lines might be a good place to start.


I'm going to school. (le collège in France is the equivalent of junior high school in the USA)


Answer 1: Yes, if you have received a legitimate high school diploma or GED, universities will accept it as part of your application. Of course, you will have to meet any other eligibility requirements of that particular university.Answer 2: The first answer's okay, but let me see if I can refine it, because the first answerer doesn't define "legitimate." Here's what that means...All US colleges and universities will accept an online high school diploma as long as said diploma was awarded by a high school that is "regionally" accredited by one of the US's six big "regional" accreditors approved by the US Department of Education (USDE).Period. That's what makes it legitimate. It matters not whether the high school's coursework was delivered by the "online" or "in-classroom" modality. All that matters is that the high school -- be it online, or otherwise -- is "regionally" accredited.There's nothing more to know; no other qualifiers or "gotchas."More details...All local public K-12 schools in the US are "regionally" accredited. And so, all US colleges and universities, as well as all US employers that require only a high school diploma, as well as any governmental requirements for a high school diploma, will positively, without a doubt, be satisfied by any high school diploma that's from a "regionally" accredited US high school. And I mean all of them. No exceptions.The rules for online high schools are exactly the same. As long as they're "regionally" accredited, as I've herein defined that term, then the diplomas that they issue will be acceptable to absolutely any US college or university.The regional accreditation of the high school, then, and not whether said high school is of the online or in-classroom type, is what matters. Period.Yes, of course, as the first answerer wrote, otherfactors may also matter to the college or university. But as long as your high school diploma is from a "regionally" accredited school, regardless whether it's in-classroom or online, the college/university will accept it.Most colleges/universities will also accept a GED, in lieu of a high school diploma, as the first answerer also suggested.



Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.