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What is DRABC?

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βˆ™ 2010-02-06 20:12:40

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what i know..

drabc is one kind of first aid to help who was injured..

d-danger

r-respon

a-airway

b-breathing

c-circulation By shai whittaker

Answerwhat i know..

drabc is one kind of first aid to help who was injured..

d-danger

r-respon

a-airway

b-breathing

c-circulation

Answerwhat i know..

drabc is one kind of first aid to help who was injured..

d-danger

r-respon

a-airway

b-breathing

c-circulation

Answerwhat i know..

drabc is one kind of first aid to help who was injured..

d-danger

r-respon

a-airway

b-breathing

c-circulation

This is basic first aid stuff

Danger

Respond

airways

breathing

circulation

2010-02-06 20:12:40
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What does DRABC stand for?

danger response airway breathing circulation


What does DRABC of first aid stand for?

it stands for danger response airway breathing and circulation


In first aid what does abc stand for?

well im in Australia and we use DRABC...they stand for: Danger- is there a danger to youself, bystanders or the casualty Response- does the casualty respond to any sort of communication between you and them Airway- does the casualty have a clear airway with no blockages Breathing- is casualty breathing Circulation- check casualties hands and feet, are they normal colour?


What is the DRSABC action plan?

I think you mean DRABC? Stands for:Danger- check for danger around you which can cause harm to the patient and yourselfResponse- COWS( can you hear me, open your eyes, whats your name, squeeze my hand)Airways- clear anything in the patients airways by turning into the recovery positionBreathingCompressionFor more info take a look at surf life saving website. sure they will have step to step info :)


What questions should you ask of a patient?

Questions shoudl be used to get a good understanding of what happened and caused an injury or illness. Most first aid training organisations suggest using a primary and secondary survey. During the primary survey, you should check for DRABC (Danger, Response, Airway, Breathing, Circulation) In the Response section, you should establish if a casualty can respond to your questions, commands or pain stimulus. Then you should move in to asking what has happened and carrying out a secondary survey and gaining as much information as possible. What has happened? When did it happen? Did anyone see it? Is anyone with you? The secondary survey includes SAMPLE (Symptoms - What are you experiencing, Allergies, Medication, Past Medical History, Last meal and Events leading up to the injury or illness.) Some other questions could include describing the pain they are experiencing. Usually you will know from the answers someone gives as to the next question to ask.


How to perform CPR on an unconscious person?

by unconscious i hope you mean unconscious-not breathing, as it will be fatal to do CPR on a breathing casualty. any way for an adult unconscious not breathing: you should follow your DRABC (danger, responses, airways, breathing, circulation/CPR). once you've checked for danger, you check for responses from the casualty, call for help, check for breathing, send someone to get an ambulance and an AED (defibrillator), you should then carry on starting with chest compressions at a depth of 5-6cm and at a rate of (30/2). with help this should be maintained for 6 cycles/2mins, without help; 3 cycles/1 min and then go for help. for child the same however you start off with 5 initial rescue breaths before going onto 30:2, whilst also using only 1 hand, and a third the depth of adult compressions. for infants the same as child, however using 2 fingers and when going for help the infant should be carried with you.


Procedures to follow when giving first aid?

TyFIRST AID TREATMENT PROCEDUREFirst aider is responsible to give an early treatment in any emergency cases occurred. It is advisable to use the Chain of Survival to illustrate the important of Golden Hours for victims especially cardiopulmonary and respiratory disease.Chain of Survival1. Early recognition of emergency and activation of the emergency medical services (EMS) or local emergency system.2. Early bystander CPR: immediate CPR can double or triple the victim's chance to survive.3. Early delivery of a shock with a defibrillator: CPR plus defibrillation within 3-5 minutes of collapse can produce survival rates as high as 49% - 75%.4. Early advanced life support followed by post resuscitation care delivered by healthcare providers.1. DRABC PrinciplesThe clear rules set out that must be follow by First Aider to ensure that the correct procedures were use in emergence treatment is by using DRABC formula:D = Danger- Ensure the safety of all those at the scene i.e. yourself, bystanders, and casualties.- Take the time to conduct a primary survey of the scene to look for anything that may threaten the safety of those on or around the scene. Hazards may include bio-hazards, flammable materials, electricity, unstable structures, slippery surfaces, sharp metal edges, oncoming traffic, and risk of explosion, fallen power lines and fast flowing water.- Don't risking your own safety in a dangerous situation as it may increase the number of casualties, so waiting for the emergency services to arrive is the only option.- Try to asses the injury mechanism and possible cause of injury from the area primary survey.- Ask help from bystander to get call the authority before giving any treatment to the victim.First Aider must introduce himself and ask permission from victim/s before giving any aid or treatment.As a general rule, avoid moving casualties unless there is hazards that cannot be remove, such as fire or poisonous fumes. If it is essential to move a casualty before an ambulance arrives extreme care should be taken and good manual handling practice must be used.R = ResponseBy checking the victim/s awareness level using the AVPU procedure:- Aware : Fully conscious- Voice : Respond to voice or command. (Drowsy or confused)Check the casualty for a response by asking loudly 'are you allright?'- Pain : Respond to pain. (Drowsy or confused)By slightly rubbing your knuckle between victim collar bones.- Unconscious : No respond ( fully unconscious)If the casualty responds- If the casualty responds by answering and appears conscious, leave them in the position in which you find them (provided they are not in further danger).- Check the casualty's condition and get send someone for help.if you are on your own, leave the casualty and go for help- Observe and reassess the casualty's vital signs regularlyIf the casualty does not respond- Shout/call for help- Check the airway- One rescuer:- Activate Emergency Medical Services (EMS)- Get automated external defibrillator (AED) if available- Return to the victim to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR)- Two rescuers or more- One rescuer should begin the steps of CPR-Second rescuer activates the EMS system and gets AED if available- When phoning for help, the rescuer should be prepared to answer questions about:- Location- What happened- Number and condition of victims- Type of aid provided- The caller should hang up only when instructed to do so by the dispatcher- Then return to the victim to provide CPRA = AirwayCheck whether the airway is 'open & clear'. Use the 'Head Tilt Chin Lift" maneuver for both injured and noninjured victims to keep the airway open to allow the victim to breathe.The jaw thrust is no longer recommended for lay rescuers because it is difficult for lay rescuers to learn and perform, is often not an effective way to open the airway, and may cause spinal movement.Head Tilt Chin Lift- place palm of hand on the forehead and gently tiltthe head back- support and lift the chin to open the airway- lift the jaw forward to open the mouthAvoid excessive head tilt if injury to the neck is suspected. If head tilt is necessary, tilt the head just enough to open the airway or apply the "Jaw thrust" method.Airway Clear = check breathingB = BreathingWhile maintaining an open away, check the victim breathing using the Look, Listen and feel method simultaneously:- Look : listen and feel for breathing for 10 seconds and to see if the chestrises- Listen : for the sound of breathing from the casualty's mouth or nose- Feel : for the rise of the chest or for air against your cheekIf Breathing Present- roll into recovery position- check the casualty's condition and get help if needed- observe and reassess the casualty's vital signs regularlyIf Breathing Absent- send someone for help if you have not already done so (*)- if you are on your own, you may need to leave the casualty and go forhelp (*)- turn the casualty onto their back if not already in this position (*)- give 5 initial breaths- ensure 2 effective breaths- ensure the chest rises with each breath- take no more than 10 seconds to complete the breaths- check for signs of circulation- Give two rescue breaths, each over onesecond- With enoughvolume to produce visible chestrise- The most commoncause of invisible chest rise is an improperly openaway- So, perfumehead tilt chin lift and give second rescue breathC = CirculationCheck and assess the victim pulse for circulation. (*)Main pulse point for adult (*) Main Pulse point for infant (below 1 year)(*)- Radial/ulna - Brachial- Carotid - Axillaries- Most rescuer fail to recognize the absence of a pulse.- Checking for signof life (breathing, coughing or movement) is superior for detection ofcirculation.If Circulation Present but no breathing- continue Emergency Airway Resuscitation (EAR)( if you're trained in EAR) until the casualty starts breathing on their own- if the casualty starts to breathe normally on their own but remainsunconscious, turn them into the recovery position.- observe and reassess the casualty's vital signs regularlyIf Circulation Absent- start chest compressions (Caution : only for First Aider well trained in CPR)- Adult and older children = 30 compressions: 2 breaths - Younger children and infant = 30 compressions: 2 breaths - Return your hands quickly to the correct position on the chest and then - give the next compressions and breaths 5 cycles within 2 minutes - Continue compressions: breathes cycles (*)Compression depth 11/2 - 2 inch- Stop to re-check for signs of a circulation after 1 minute, and then every 2 minutes. Also stop to check if the casualty makes a movement or takes a spontaneous breath2. PROCEED WITH MUSCULARSKELETAL ASSESSMENT:Do a whole body assessment to ensure whether there any injury and type.Give treatment in accordance with type of injury such as apply bandage and dressing for bleeding and wound.3. GIVE THE APPROPRIATE TREATMENT/ASSISTANT until the authority or medical help arrive.pe your anser here...