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What is a disjunct tone?

Updated: 3/22/2024
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11y ago

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A disjunct tone is a musical pitch that is not adjacent to the previous pitch. It involves a leap or skip rather than a stepwise movement. Disjunct tones can create tension or excitement in a musical composition.

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