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What is a no args constructor?

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2010-01-18 22:38:18
2010-01-18 22:38:18

No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.

No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.

No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.

No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.

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2010-01-18 22:38:18

No args means no arguments. Just like any regular method, a constructor can have zero or more arguments.

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Related Questions


Nothing Happens. Actually such a constructor is called a Default Constructor. Even if we do not write a constructor for a class, Java would automatically place a default constructor inside the class. Ex: Public class Test { public String getName(){ return "Hi"; } } Public class TestEx { public static void main(String[] args){ Test obj = new Test(); System.out.println(obj.getName()); } } Here we were able to instantiate an object of class Test even though we did not define a constructor for that class. This is because Java automatically places a default constructor for the class.


System defined constructor or Default constructor is the constructor that the JVM would place in every java class irrespective of whether we code it manually or not. This is to ensure that we do not have compile time issues or instantiation issues even if we miss declaring/coding the constructor specifically. Ex: public class Test { public String getName() { return "Rocky"l } Public static void main(String[] args){ Test obj = new Test(); String name = obj.getName(); } } Here we were able to instantiate the class Test even though we did not declare a no argument constructor. This is the default constructor that gets called when we try to instantiate it.


If you're referring to "args" in the line: "public static void main(String args[])", then it is the name of the array that holds the command line arguments. So, if you called your java program (called myJavaProgram) from the command line using the following line: java myJavaProgram Hello World "These are args" Then args would have the following values stored in it: args[0] = "Hello" args[1] = "World" args[2] = "These are args" If you called your program from the command line like this: java myJavaProgram Different Args then args would contain args[0] = "Different" args[1] = "Args"


Overloading a constructor means typing in multiple versions of the constructor, each having a different argument list, like the following examples: class Car { Car() { } Car(String s) { } } The preceding Car class has two overloaded constructors, one that takes a string, and one with no arguments. Because there's no code in the no-arg version, it's actually identical to the default constructor the compiler supplies, but remember-since there's already a constructor in this class (the one that takes a string), the compiler won't supply a default constructor. If you want a no-arg constructor to overload the with-args version you already have, you're going to have to type it yourself, just as in the Car example. Overloading a constructor is typically used to provide alternate ways for clients to instantiate objects of your class.


Overloading a constructor means typing in multiple versions of the constructor, each having a different argument list, like the following examples: class Car { Car() { } Car(String s) { } } The preceding Car class has two overloaded constructors, one that takes a string, and one with no arguments. Because there's no code in the no-arg version, it's actually identical to the default constructor the compiler supplies, but remember-since there's already a constructor in this class (the one that takes a string), the compiler won't supply a default constructor. If you want a no-arg constructor to overload the with-args version you already have, you're going to have to type it yourself, just as in the Car example. Overloading a constructor is typically used to provide alternate ways for clients to instantiate objects of your class. For example, if a client knows the Car name, they can pass that to a Car constructor that takes a string. But if they don't know the name, the client can call the no-arg constructor and that constructor can supply a default name.


Overloading a constructor means typing in multiple versions of the constructor, each having a different argument list, like the following examples: class Car { Car() { } Car(String s) { } } The preceding Car class has two overloaded constructors, one that takes a string, and one with no arguments. Because there's no code in the no-arg version, it's actually identical to the default constructor the compiler supplies, but remember-since there's already a constructor in this class (the one that takes a string), the compiler won't supply a default constructor. If you want a no-arg constructor to overload the with-args version you already have, you're going to have to type it yourself, just as in the Car example. Overloading a constructor is typically used to provide alternate ways for clients to instantiate objects of your class. For example, if a client knows the Car name, they can pass that to a Car constructor that takes a string. But if they don't know the name, the client can call the no-arg constructor and that constructor can supply a default name


If you don't type a constructor into your class code, a default constructor will be automatically generated by the compiler. The default constructor is ALWAYS a no-arg constructor. (Obviously the compiler has no clue what all arguments you might want for your class. So it takes the safe way out with a no argument constructor) A no-arg constructor is not necessarily the default (i.e., compiler-supplied) constructor, although the default constructor is always a no-arg constructor. The default constructor is the one the compiler provides! While the default constructor is always a no-arg constructor, you're free to put in your own no-arg constructor.


A parameter constructor is a constructor within a class with some arguments in it. class abc { abc()---------------------------------Default Constructor { } abc(int d)---------------------------Parameter Constructor { } }


An empty constructor takes no arguments and calls the default constructor


A default constructor is a constructor that takes no arguments.Here's a sample:class c{int a,b;c() //Constructor 1{a=2;b=1;}c(int x, int y) //Constructor 2{a=x;b=y;}};Here, Constructor 1 is called the default constructor, while Constructor 2 is a parameterized constructor.


There is no specific keyword for a constructor in C++. Simply define and declare a method of the class with the same name as the class and it will be a constructor. A constructor with no arguments is the default constructor, a constructor with one argument of class type is the copy constructor, and a constructor with one argument of some other type is the conversion constructor. You can provide other overloaded constructors if you want.


You are free to override the default constructor whenever you like. In fact, if you want to keep the default constructor when you also need a parameterized constructor, you have to override the default constructor in order to use it. Once you've written the parameterized constructor, the default constructor goes away.


An implicit constructor call will always call the default constructor, whereas explicit constructor calls allow to chose the best constructor and passing of arguments into the constructor.


default constructor is used only when the programmer does not use a constructor to initialize objects. Once the programmer defines a constructor then the default constructor is no longer used


In the case of Java, not always. The class does require a constructor, but the compiler will automatically include an "empty constructor" (constructor without parameters) under certain conditions.In the case of Java, not always. The class does require a constructor, but the compiler will automatically include an "empty constructor" (constructor without parameters) under certain conditions.In the case of Java, not always. The class does require a constructor, but the compiler will automatically include an "empty constructor" (constructor without parameters) under certain conditions.In the case of Java, not always. The class does require a constructor, but the compiler will automatically include an "empty constructor" (constructor without parameters) under certain conditions.


yes we can call constructor


Constructor is used to do something (written in constructor) immediately after object creation.


Default Constructor Parameterised Constructor Non Parameterised Constructor


There is no such thing as a default parameterized constructor. The default constructor is always the 'no-arg' constructor and does not take any parameters or arguments as input


When any constructor is deffined in your class, the java compiler create a default no argument constructor for you. This constructor only have an invocation to the super class constructor (" super( ) ").


Every class, including abstract classes, MUST have a constructor. Hard Code that into your brain. But just because a class must have one, doesn't mean the programmer has to type it. A constructor looks like this: class Car { Car() { } // The constructor for the Car class } You notice anything missing in the declaration above? There's no return type! Two key points to remember about constructors are that they have no return type and their names must exactly match the class name. Typically, constructors are used to initialize instance variable state, as follows: class Car { int size; String name; Car(String name, int size) { this.name = name; this.size = size; } } The two types of constructors are: default or no-arg constructor and constructor with args.


All Java programs would have a constructor... public class Test { public Test(){ ... } ..... } This is a constructor. Even if you dont code the constructor Java would automatically place a default constructor for compilation.


A constructor that has arguments in it.Ex:class Car {Car() { }Car(String s) { }}The line in bold is the argument constructor and the other is the default (no-arg) constructor


The default constructor is an empty (only call the super constructor) with no parameters constructor inserted by the java compiler when you don't define a constructor in your class. If you write something like this: public class NoConstructorClass{ //no constructor goes here } Then you get something like this: public class NoConstructorClass{ public NoConstructorClass(){ // Default constructor that you didn't write super(); } }


A copy constructor is a type of constructor which constructs the object of the class from another object of the same class. The copy constructor accepts a reference to its own class as a parameter. A valid copy constructor can be specified as, class A { ...... ...... public: A(&A); }



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