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Math and Arithmetic

What is an example for significant figures?

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January 24, 2018 5:01AM

Significant figures are important for science, they tell how certain you are of a certain value. The rules for significant figures are as follows:

If it is a decimal number, look at the first number on the left. If it is not zero, start counting the amount of numbers, and that's how many significant figures you have. For example, 7.495 has 4 significant figures. If it is zero, keep going until there is digit larger than zero, and start counting the numbers until the end. However many numbers there are, that's how many significant figures you have. For example, 0.000331 has 3 significant figures.

If the number does not have a decimal, start from the right and if the number is not zero, start counting numbers and that's how many significant figures you have. For example, 93847 has 5 significant figures. If it is zero, the first significant figure will be the first non-zero digit. For example 3873000 has 4 significant figures.

When you add or subtract some numbers, the amount of significant figures the answer should be expressed in depends on the number with the least amount of decimal places. For example,

4.398 + 5.2 = 9.6

You express the answer to the lowest number of decimal places a value you are adding or subtracting has.

When you multiply or divide numbers, the answer is expressed to the lowest amount of significant figures that the values have. For example:

55 x 7 = 400 (when expressed with correct significant figures)

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December 18, 2014 2:47PM

Significant figures are important for science, they tell how certain you are of a certain value. The rules for significant figures are as follows:

If it is a decimal number, look at the first number on the left. If it is not zero, start counting the amount of numbers, and that's how many significant figures you have. For example, 7.495 has 4 significant figures. If it is zero, keep going until there is digit larger than zero, and start counting the numbers until the end. However many numbers there are, that's how many significant figures you have. For example, 0.000331 has 3 significant figures.


If the number does not have a decimal, start from the right and if the number is not zero, start counting numbers and that's how many significant figures you have. For example, 93847 has 5 significant figures. If it is zero, the first significant figure will be the first non-zero digit. For example 3873000 has 4 significant figures.


When you add or subtract some numbers, the amount of significant figures the answer should be expressed in depends on the number with the least amount of decimal places. For example,


4.398 + 5.2 = 9.6


You express the answer to the lowest number of decimal places a value you are adding or subtracting has.


When you multiply or divide numbers, the answer is expressed to the lowest amount of significant figures that the values have. For example,


55 x 7 = 400 (when expressed with correct significant figures)