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Ice melting is a good example - energy is used to melt the ice but no work is done so it is sometimes called useless energy - check Wika Dictionary def.

Take a bag of red marbles and a bag of blue marble and dump them together on a table top. You will notice that the marble mix together instead of segregating into coloured groups. This in entropy.

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โˆ™ 2008-02-18 22:04:25
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Q: What is an example of entropy?
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Related questions

Is ice melting an example of entropy?

yes ice melting is an example of entropy because the order of molecules is disturbed and it approaches disorder by heating this is entropy


What condition entropy can decrease in a system?

Entropy of a system can decrease if entropy of the environment increases. One example is heat rejection.


Which are descriptions of entropy?

Entropy is a thermodynamic property dealing with disorder. For example, a gas would have a higher entropy than a solid, because the molecules are more disordered. Entropy, along with enthalpy, can be used to determine the spontaneity of a reaction.


What happens to the entropy in the reaction?

Entropy increases. In a reaction comprised of sub-reactions, some sub-reactions may show a decrease in entropy but the entire reaction will show an increase of entropy. As an example, the formation of sugar molecules by living organisms is a process that shows decrease in entropy at the expense of the loss of entropy by the sun.


Example of entropy?

It's not much use to give "examples of entropy"; it is an abstract concept that you must try to understand as such. Anyway, any matter that has heat energy, has entropy.


What the example of the statement the entropy of the universe can never decrease?

If a source of heat energy starts radiating from a point and continues without stop the entropy around that point will never decrease. As sun is the endless heat energy radiating source and surrounding's of that is known as universe accepted by everybody. So this is the example for the statement ' the entropy of the universe can never decrease.'


When someone order something don't he reduce entropy of the universe?

No. You can reduce the entropy of some system, but that will be at the cost of an entropy increase somewhere else. This is because it costs energy to put something in order. The TOTAL entropy in the Universe will always increase. For example, the entropy on planet Earth probably remains more or less constant over millions of years - but we do so using energy, mainly from the Sun, and the fact that energy from the Sun radiates into space is an increase of entropy; much greater than any small change of entropy on our planet.


Who discover entropy?

Entropy can be considered inefficiency. For example, in cooking food, a lot of heat is also going elsewhere. As science evolved, the desire for machines with perfect efficiency grew, and the difficulty of that became better understood. The term entropy was coined in 1865 by Rudolf Clausius.


What happens to the entropy when a solution is made?

The entropy increases.


What causes endothermic reactions?

A change in entropy. Energy is comprised of enthalpy and entropy deltaE = deltaH - TdeltaS where deltaE is change in energy, deltaH change in enthalpy, T is temperature and deltaS is change in entropy. If a reaction is endothermic then there must be a corresponding increase in entropy. For example some salts when they dissolve in water are endothermic - this change is driven by the fact that there is a massive increase in entropy to go from an ordered salt crystal to a dissordered, dissolved salt solution.


When does entropy increases?

entropy is a measure of disorder entropy increases for example from solid --> liquid or liquid --> gas or solid --> gas or liquid --> aqueous when the particles become more "free" and there are more spaces between them that means that the entropy has increased


What does the second law of thermodynamics say about entropy?

The entropy and the systems surrounding it tend to increase.


What is an example of entropy occurring in a living system?

The most blatant example of entropy occurring in a living system is death. No matter how much energy is put into keeping a living system in order, it eventually falls into decline. In this sense, the lack of predictability of living systems, is actually quite predictable.


What is an example of entropy decreasing?

This is a trick question, because in the world as we know it, entropy never decreases, since the chance of this happening approaches and infinitely small fraction. To answer the question though: Take any closed system of events that you've observed, and rewind the events as if you were "going back in time". Example: An egg the has splattered all of a sudden recombines off the floor and becomes a whole egg again. Some scientists believe that the last time entropy ever decreased in our universe was right before the big bang. Since this chance occurrence, entropy throughout the whole universe has been steadily increasing. My addition (person 2) - However, entropy CAN decrease locally, just not universally. Essentially entropy rests on the fact that work ultimately comes from a flow of heat energy from high to low, eventually balancing out. Once all the heat energy is uniform in the universe, we will experience "heat death" at which point no work will be able to be done. However, in systems WITHIN the closed system of the universe, entropy CAN be decreased. Freezing an ice cube, if you follow the entropy equation which I don't have with me, is one example of this. The cost of this local decrease in entropy is a universal increase in entropy from the heat released that is greater than the local decrease in entropy, thus the second law is not violated. Another example is biological growth. We humans develop from a single cell into a vastly complex arrangement of cells, but at the same time we produce heat that increases universal entropy more than our bodies decrease it.


Why entropy is change?

Entropy is not change. Entropy is disorder.


What best defines entropy?

Entropy define the state of disorder (big entropy) or order (low entropy).


What does s stand for in chemistry?

The letter S in chemistry is used in thermodynamics. It stands for entropy. For example, the change in the entropy of the universe (delta S) is equal to delta S of the system plus delta S of the surrounding.


Can entropy be negative?

I am not sure whether you refer to delta S (change in entropy) or entropy itself. So I'll answer for both.For S (entropy), which is defined by the function S=kln(omega), where k is Boltzmann's constant and omega is the number of microstates corresponding to a given state, the answer is no. Why? Omega (the number of microstates possible for a certain state) can never be smaller than one. Since Boltzmann's constant is a positive number and ln(omega) will always be greater or equal to zero, entropy will never be negative.However, when calculating delta S (change in entropy in a thermodynamic process), yes entropy can be negative. Remember entropy is essentially the state of disorder of a system since (on a macroscopic level) the natural progression of the world is from order to disorder. (For example, there are more ways to have a messy room than to have an impeccable, neat room). For the change in entropy to be negative just think of it in terms of the room analogy: initially, it was messy, but then it got neater. The state of disorder of things was lessened. Applying this to a chemistry example:CO 2 (g)--> CO 2 (s)An element/compound in a gaseous state always has a greater state of entropy (gaseous molecules are more free to move). However, an element/compound in a solid state has a smaller state of entropy because molecules in a solid are less free to move. Smaller state of entropy - greater state of entropy=negative entropy


What is an example of decreasing?

This is a trick question, because in the world as we know it, entropy never decreases, since the chance of this happening approaches and infinitely small fraction. To answer the question though: Take any closed system of events that you've observed, and rewind the events as if you were "going back in time". Example: An egg the has splattered all of a sudden recombines off the floor and becomes a whole egg again. Some scientists believe that the last time entropy ever decreased in our universe was right before the big bang. Since this chance occurrence, entropy throughout the whole universe has been steadily increasing. My addition (person 2) - However, entropy CAN decrease locally, just not universally. Essentially entropy rests on the fact that work ultimately comes from a flow of heat energy from high to low, eventually balancing out. Once all the heat energy is uniform in the universe, we will experience "heat death" at which point no work will be able to be done. However, in systems WITHIN the closed system of the universe, entropy CAN be decreased. Freezing an ice cube, if you follow the entropy equation which I don't have with me, is one example of this. The cost of this local decrease in entropy is a universal increase in entropy from the heat released that is greater than the local decrease in entropy, thus the second law is not violated. Another example is biological growth. We humans develop from a single cell into a vastly complex arrangement of cells, but at the same time we produce heat that increases universal entropy more than our bodies decrease it.


What is an example of 2nd law of thermodynamics?

The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy increases. The fact that we cannot build a perpetual motion machine, is one example.


Why can't entropy be reversed?

It's not that entropy can't be reversed, it's that the entropy of the universe is always increasing. That means that while you can reduce the entropy of something, the entropy of another thing must go up even more so that in total, the entropy goes up.


Is it possible for entropy to be negative and For entropy change to be negative and For entropy production to be negative?

Assuming you mean can entropy be reduced; the answer is yes. Only in an open system such as our planet. The universe is a closed systems. The entropy of the universe cannot be reduced. Chemical changes can reduced entropy in an open system. When gas turns into a liquid or when a liquid turns into a solid; entropy is reduced.


What state of matter has the least entropy?

entropy is the measure of randomness of particles higher is randomness higher is the entropy so solids have least entropy due to least randomness.


Does the entropy of a system depend on number of moles?

If you take entropy as an extensive variable then the magnitude of the entropy does depend on the number of moles. If you take entropy as an intensive variable then its magnitude it dependent on the other variables you combined it with. However sense you always deal with entropy as a change in entropy the magnitude doesn't really matter.


Under what condition can entropy decrease in a system?

First of all, entropy is the defined as the extent to which something is disordered. In chemistry, for entropy in a SYSTEM to decrease, the products of a reaction must be less disordered than the reactants. The extent of "disordered-ness" can be seen by the physical states of the substances. A gas is more disordered than a liquid, which is more disordered than a solid. So, an example of a reaction that leads to a decrease in entropy is: HCl(gas) +NH3(gas) -----> NH4Cl(solid) So you see, there are more gaseous molecules in the reactant side of the equation than in the product side, which means the products are less disordered than the reactants. ----------------------------------------------- However, one must note that if the entropy of a system(reaction) decreases, the entropy of the surroundings should increase. This is because change in TOTAL entropy(A) = change in entropy of SYSTEM(B) + change in entropy of SURROUNDINGS(C). It is a rule that A must increase in every case ( have a positive value). If the B is negative(a decrease in entropy), C must be positive(an increase in entropy) to keep the value of A positive.