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Pend- is the Latin root of the English verb "pondered." The English active past tense ultimately traces back to the Latin noun pondus ("weight," from the root ponder-), the verb pendere ("to hang," "to suspend," "to weigh" and, figuratively, "to ponder") and the root pend- ("hang"). The pronunciation will be "pend" in Church and classical Latin.

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7y ago
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12y ago
  • One of the Latin roots in pondered is ponder, which means to give through or deep consideration.
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12y ago

Because if you put your finger over the ending of the latin word, it normally sounds or looks like the word.

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11y ago

pond means to wiegh. i really dont know how its the same st all

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6y ago

the English word, 'ponder' derives from the Latin word 'ponderare' meaning to weigh or consider

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12y ago

to think over,

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Q: What is the Latin root of the English verb 'pondered'?
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