The Raven (Poem)

What is the Night's Plutonian Shore in The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe?

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08/18/2013

"The Night's Plutonian Shore" could refer to the afterlife. Pluto was the Roman God of the underworld. The entire poem revolves around the lost love Lenore. The raven is a reminder or a messenger from beyond the curtain of death to the unnamed protagonist.

"Plutonian Shore" has nothing to do with the now dwarf planet Pluto, as previously stated. Pluto was not discovered until March of 1930. 85 years after the publication of The Raven.

The dwarf planet Pluto has nothing to do with this poem. Pluto was another name for Hades, ruler of the underworld in Greek religion/mythology. Basically he was the devil where as his brother, Zeus, ruled heaven. As stated above "The Night's Plutonian Shore" could refer to the afterlife, because the root word is Pluto, referring to Hades. I believe that the shore part is creativity at work, but I'm probably wrong, that's just what I want to think. In poems you have to wonder why the poet choose those words, so I believe the first answer is right, that the raven is a reminder or a messenger from beyond the curtain of death to the unnamed protagonist.
The narrator believes the raven is from the shore of the River Styx in the Underworld, the abode of the dead in Greek mythology. "Plutonian" is a reference to Pluto, the god of the Underworld.