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Answered 2013-12-11 14:20:48

The "Winnie Mandela necklace" unfortunately has nothing to do with jewelry, it is a cruel and gruesome way of executing people and was used during Apartheid by the ANC and others their own black brothers & sisters who were suspected of being friendly to whites.

ANC 'freedom-fighters' and 'liberators' would take black people and hack off their hands or tie them behind the person's back with barbed wire. Then a gasoline-filled tyre would be set alight around the victim's ("traitor's") neck and they would slowly and very painfully burn to death.

A series of information about necklacing and the torture camps it came from can be found in related links. The images and videos are very graphic.

Winnie Mandela famously screamed to thousands at a large open-air rally in 1985/86: "with our matches and necklaces, we'll liberate this country!", implying that those who do not take the ANC's side will be burnt alive. Such threats by Winnie Mandela could very well be considered terrorism against the very people she claimed to intend liberating.

Exiled members of the ANC were taught about necklacings and torture techniques at terror-training camps in places like Angola (eg. Camp Quatro) and Mozambique.

(Slogans such as "one rope, one sellout", "one bullet, one white baby" and "kill the boer (white/farmer)" are still heard in SA today. In fact, a case of genocide has been made against 12 or 13 SA leaders, including the President (Jacob Zuma) and the ANC Youth League President, Julius Malema. According to the Rome Convention, incitement to commit genocide is also a punishable offence and the ANC has launched several appeals against court decisions that "kill the boer" is "hate speech" and "incitement to commit genocide". The matter is being investigated by the ICC in The Hague. Shortly before the 2010 Soccer World Cup in South Africa, Winnie Mandela's staff was in the news for threatening a gun-store owner, and saying: "July 12 all whites will be killed.")

Since the invention of Winnie's necklaces, there have also been necklacings in Brazilian favelas (slums) from time to time.

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