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2008-09-03 11:28:43
2008-09-03 11:28:43

The adjective in that sentence is "beautiful". An adjective is used to desciribe a noun. The noun in the sentence is "gift".

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2020-06-02 10:08:54
2020-06-02 10:08:54

Doing word

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Related Questions



Weak is an adjective in that sentence. It describes the noun "answer".


Gave is a verb, not an adjective. An adjective is a word that describes a verb. In the sentence "I ran quickly.", quickly would be an adverb because it's describing the verb "ran".


The object pronoun is us, the indirect object of the verb 'gave'.The personal pronoun 'they' is the subject of the sentence.The possessive adjective 'your' describes the noun 'books'.The possessive adjective 'his' describes the noun 'CDs'.


Stern can be an adjective. Stern serves as an adjective in the following sentence. Mark gave Jake a stern gaze. Stern is also a noun. It is a part of a boat.


The pronoun in the sentence is her, a possessive adjective describing the book as 'belonging to her'.


It is an adjective ! Sentence -- "Mitch gave too blunt of an answer to Dinie Slothouber's request".


Well, it depends, if you just used the word valentine in a sentence such as this: He gave me a beautiful valentine. The word valentine would be used as a noun, but if you said valentine's day in a sentence such as this: Happy valentine's day! Then it would be an adjective because it is describing what kind of day it was. I hope that helped! :)


'Set' as a noun: She gave me a beautiful set of dishes.


He gave a wistful smile as we talked about our university days. (adjective)He smiled wistfully as we talked. (adverb)


Contemptuous is an adjectiveShe gave him a contemptuous look


No. Gave is the past tense of the verb give.


A = article certain = man man = subject, common noun gave = verb a = article great = adjective supper = noun, direct object


As a noun: The external gave it a hand made look.As an adjective: His external gruffness is just covering his softer side.


The only way i would think of saying it would be: His responsiveness towards the question was even quicker than mine. I hope that works, see responsive is an adjective, and responsiveness is the noun for that, and in the sentence i just gave responsiveness is acting like a noun, with his acting as an adjective.


As a noun: He worked for many years to achieve excellence in his craft.As a noun: The teacher appreciated her excellence in school.As an adjective: She was awarded the excellenceprize for photography.As an adjective: The principal gave me an excellence award.


"Comprehensible" is the adjective form of comprehension. The student gave comprehensible answers.


Octavian gave Cleopatra a beautiful funeral. According to Plutarch,"...he gave orders that her body should be buried with that of Antony in splendid and regal fashion."


He gave her his heart. She gave him a cold shoulder.


She only gave the clothes a cursory look knowing she couldn't afford them. The word cursory is an adjective. You could also use the word casual.


"Her impressionist style paintings hung up on her beautifully painted walls gave all her guests great aesthetic pleasure." (Aesthetic is an adjective)



No, the word 'larger' is the comparative form of the adjective large (larger, largest). An adjective is a word used to describe a noun.A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun in a sentence; for example:"Jack got a larger bicycle for his birthday. He gave his old bicycle to his smaller cousin."The pronoun 'he' takes the place of the noun 'Jack' in the second sentence.The adjective 'larger' describes the noun 'bicycle'.


No. It is an adjective.An adverb is a descriptive word that modifies a verb. 'Unfamiliar' does not modify a verb (e.g. the sentence "Dave unfamiliar glanced at Karen, who scowled" does not make sense, because 'unfamiliar' isn't an adverb), and therefore is not an adverb. In a sentence that uses 'unfamiliar': "Dave gave Karen an unfamiliar glance," 'unfamiliar' is modifying 'glance,' a noun, not 'gave,' the verb. Therefore, one may conclude that 'unfamiliar' is an adjective, not an adverb.


Yes, her can be an adjective if it is acting as a possessive pronoun. For example, "She gave me her coat." Her is describing who's coat it is.



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