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2013-04-27 14:14:13
2013-04-27 14:14:13

The answer will depend on formula for WHAT! Its dimensions, surface area, volume, principal diagonal, mass. And on what information is available.

The answer will depend on formula for WHAT! Its dimensions, surface area, volume, principal diagonal, mass. And on what information is available.

The answer will depend on formula for WHAT! Its dimensions, surface area, volume, principal diagonal, mass. And on what information is available.

The answer will depend on formula for WHAT! Its dimensions, surface area, volume, principal diagonal, mass. And on what information is available.

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2013-04-27 14:14:13
2013-04-27 14:14:13

The answer will depend on formula for WHAT! Its dimensions, surface area, volume, principal diagonal, mass. And on what information is available.

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Related Questions


If the base is a rectangle, use the formula for the area of a rectangle.


The base of a rectangular prism is a base of a rectangle!


the base of a cube is a square but the base of a rectangle prism is a rectangle


The base of a rectangular prism is a rectangle. The area of a rectangle is length times width.


same as a rectangle, except multiply by height. Area of Base X Height or L*W*H


It depends what kind of prism: Rectangular prism-rectangle Could be circle too. It depends on what kind of prism it is. If it is a rectangular prism, it's base is a rectangle. If it's a triangular prism, it's base will be a triangle. P.S.-If you have any other questions about prisms or geometry in general, feel free to ask me!


The base of a rectangular prism is just an old familiar 2D rectangle. All the old familiar 2D formulas for rectangles still apply to it.


The volume of a rectangular prism is found by multiplying the base by the rectangle by the width of the prism, leading to the formula: lwh = Awhere l is the length of the prismw is the width of the prism andh is the height of the prism.



The height of the base is part of the triangle and the height of the prism is the height of the rectangle


A triangular PYRAMID has a triangular base.


The answer depends on the formula for what characteristic of the prism.


One is a triangle base...and the other a rectangle..


The formula is Bxh where B is the base which is the area of the triangle and h is the height of the prism.



The Formula is Base*Height, or 1/2 Height (altitude of the triangle) * Base (of the Triangle) * height (Height of the prism)


The fact that it's a prism has nothing to do with the area of the base. See the attached Related Link for your formula.


It depends on the size of the triangular prism, but depending on the side of the prism you use the triangle area formula to find it or the rectangle area formula to find it.


The volume of the rectangular prism is:Volume = length x width x heightORVolume = Base x height, where Baseis the area of the rectangle on the side of the prism.


Their base shape. For example a rectangular prism has base that is a rectangle. Guess what kind of base shape a triangular prism has? yes, triangle.


a triangular prism is different from a rectangular prism because: their names are different a triangular prism has a triangle for its' base a rectangular prism has a rectangle base a triangular prism has less sides than a rectangular prism a rectangular prism has more sides than a triangular prism


triangular prism- formula: Abh(area of the base * height)


The base of a prism is always rectangular, so the area, A, =lw. l is length, w is width, of the base.


2 shapes, a triangle, and a rectangle.since it is a prism, it is like a pyramid, 4 of the faces are triangles,but the base is a rectangle, hence the name rectangularprismtherefore, 2 shapes


does a rectangle prism have 6 sides



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