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What is the majority of stars?


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Answered 2016-03-29 15:44:25

One item of note is that fairly recent studies indicate that the majority of stars in the galaxy are the faint and small red dwarfs; estimates of the population in our Milky Way galaxy say they constitute something between three quarters to over 85%, although most are too dim to see. Observations of nearby elliptical galaxies showed their abundance to be around twenty times that of our own galaxy. This changed some ideas about the universe and their abundance even tripled some estimates of the total number of stars.

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Answered 2016-03-29 12:30:37

You can fill that out with lots of verbs, for example, "the majority of stars shine". Here are some others:* The majority of stars are smaller than our Sun.

* The majority of stars are main-sequence stars. That means that they fuse hydrogen-1, converting it into helium-4.

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The majority of the stars in the Milky Way are main sequence stars. Of those red dwarfs comprise about 70%


There are literally billions of billions of stars. The vast majority are medium stars.


well,there are a majority number of stars, but in this case you might want to say 1,000 because there are that many so 1,000


Yellow dwarf stars like our own sun.


on the hr diagram which stars have the lowest luminousity


Stars a yellow-ish orange for the majority of their lifetimes.


Yes, stars can exist outside of a Galaxy, but the majority are within a galaxy.


Outside our (Milky Way) galaxy.


Correct. M-type stars on the main sequence are called red dwarfs.


On the main sequence. Those are basically the stars that fuse hydrogen-1 into helium-4.


White dwarfs are the remnants of dead low to medium mass stars, which is the mass range of the majority of stars.


Stars. They produce heavier elements upon their death.


Actually, not all of them are white, but the vast majority of them are.


hydrogen,All stars are composed primarily of hydrogen. Stars can also contain some other elements such as helium, but hydrogen accounts for the majority of a star's composition.


It isn't. At least, it isn't bigger than all other stars. The majority of stars are smaller than the Sun, but there are several that are much larger than the Sun.


For example, our Sun has a diameter of about 1.4 million kilometers. Some other stars are bigger - up to hundreds of times bigger. The majority of stars, however, are smaller than our Sun.


Hydrogen is the fuel for all new stars.


No. The vast majority of stars in our galaxy are too far away to see, and many are hidden behind clouds fo gas and dust.


There are huge variations in a star's diameter. Our Sun has a diameter of about 1.4 million kilometers, but a few stars have hundreds of times this diameter - and of course, some stars are smaller than our Sun. It is hard to say what is "normal" with such huge variations, but probably the majority of stars are a little smaller than our Sun.There are huge variations in a star's diameter. Our Sun has a diameter of about 1.4 million kilometers, but a few stars have hundreds of times this diameter - and of course, some stars are smaller than our Sun. It is hard to say what is "normal" with such huge variations, but probably the majority of stars are a little smaller than our Sun.There are huge variations in a star's diameter. Our Sun has a diameter of about 1.4 million kilometers, but a few stars have hundreds of times this diameter - and of course, some stars are smaller than our Sun. It is hard to say what is "normal" with such huge variations, but probably the majority of stars are a little smaller than our Sun.There are huge variations in a star's diameter. Our Sun has a diameter of about 1.4 million kilometers, but a few stars have hundreds of times this diameter - and of course, some stars are smaller than our Sun. It is hard to say what is "normal" with such huge variations, but probably the majority of stars are a little smaller than our Sun.


All of them - but mostly hydrogen & helium.


Stars form in all parts of our galaxy - not just the "arms". Stars do indeed form in the central bulge. The vast majority of hot, young, blue stars are formed in the arms, but stars also form in the central bulge as well.


Our Sun is a main sequence star, as too are most of the stars you can see. There are exceptions, Betelgeuse, Antares are a few but the majority are Main Sequence Stars.


Stars are born in areas of space that contain a high enough density of molecular hydrogen to cause fusion. These areas of space are known as molecular clouds and are the locations in space where the majority of stars are created.


I guess that would refer to a star that is part of a galaxy. That would apply to the vast majority of stars.


Within the macro-universe, in stars. Within the micro-universe within the nucleus of the atom.



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