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Answered 2011-02-15 23:10:38

Sun naturally gives you Vitamin D.

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no, it gives you D The Sun helps you absorb the vitamin, but it doesn't actually give you the vitamin


The sun gives out vitamin D, necessary for healthy bones.


The Sun makes your skin create Vitamin D.


Sun is a significant source of Vitamin D because the UV (ultra-violet) rays from sunlight trigger vitamin D synthesis in the skin.


Vitamins are chemicals the Sun does not give off any chemicals that we can absorb on Earth. When certain wavelenghts of UV light hit our skin we can make vitamin D3 from cholesterol.


The sun gives Vitamin D, nothing else. It gives energy to plants, which then give oxygen.


it gives heat, light and fire


No. Vitamin D is the only vitamin that comes from the sun.


If you mean,"do we get vitamin D from the sun?" then yes, we do. If you mean,"does the sun burn up vitamin D?" or,"Did the sun come into existence as a giant ball of vitamin D?" then no.


Human skin has the capacity to make vitamin D with the help of sunlight; it is a form of photosynthesis.


No, Vitamin C does not come from the sun; We receive Vitamin D from the sun. You can get Vitamin C from oranges, lemons (citrus fruits).


no...vitamin e does not come from the sun. vitamin k comes from the sun I thought it was vitamin D which came from the sun? Anyway, vitamin e comes from things like soya, corn and olive oil.


the sun gives us a vitamin that we soak up through our skin, called vitamin D. Without Vitamin D your bones would be brittle, thin, and you couldn't talk or walk!


Wheat grass and dark leafy foods, but tanning for a half hour can give you a dose of vitamin D that lasts for days!



Sunlight helps in making of (synthesis of) Vitamin D. but Vitamin E is something that can only be consumed to meet the requirements of our body. E works as an anti- oxidant and it also a fat soluble vitamin. but no studies confirm that vitamins E cn be give off by sunlight. Vitamin help for nourishment or skin and hair as well. if Vitamin E were to be given out by Sunlight, sun damage would never have been an issue.


The Sun does not make Vitamin D. But a human being's body makes Vitamin D when exposed to the UV or ultraviolet rays of the Sun.


You need to get out in the sun. When you get out in the sun the UV light will give your psoriasis a supplement of Vitamin D helping your skin.


yes the sun help absorb vitamin c


well - vitamin d comes from the sun. if you stay in the sun for too long (large dose of vitamin d) without protection, then you get burnt. but that is not really an allergic reaction. in very severe allergic disabilities then some people (e.g. albinos) are allergic to direct sunshine. some people might say that this is being allergic to vitamin d my final answer is that yes some people could be allergic to vitamin d thx 4 askn da questn x im plzd 2 answr it. love you xx


The standard dose of Vitamin B12 delivered by intramuscular injection is 1,000 mcg. This is equal to one syringe once per day.


Vitamin D is found in egg yolk, cod liver oil, fish, "Sunny D", Milk products etc, but you can attain it from multivitamin tablets. Lack of it can lead to Rickets (retarded bone growth and bone malformation).Vitamin d is getting sun and fish.Milk and getting sun.People naturally get vitamin D through direct exposure to sunlight. Milk is also a source of vitamin D, as are multivitamins or supplements. You can get vitamin D from the sunOne source of Vitamin D is sunlight. If you need a dose, soak up some rays. Just don't overdo it and burn.


no thre sun addiquatly provides vitamin d for our skin


Yes. for an example, vitamen D. u get it from the sun. you get sun burned and will burn cells you need. if u take too many vitamens, your body cant take the dose that your taking and WILL backfire.




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