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What was the Edict of Nantes?


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Answered 2017-12-11 04:48:33

In 1598, King Henry IV- who was raised a Protestant- issued the Edict of Nantes, granting religious freedom in most of France. It basically established civil rights for the Huguenots, Calvinist Protestants within predominantly Roman Catholic France. It allowed Protestants to live and worship anywhere except in Paris and a few other cities. Henry's law stopped the religious wars in France, but resentment between Catholics and Protestants continued.

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