Browning Firearms

What years were browning 12 gauge autos from Belgium made?

123

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2011-02-11 02:02:25
2011-02-11 02:02:25

Special orders are still being made.

001
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


Your browning model auto-5 shotgun in 16ga.was made by FN of belguim for browning in 1951.That makes your shotgun 60 years old.


The very first A5s were made in Belgium in 1903. Several thousand were made for import to Browning and were marked "Browning Automatic Arms CO." After the first several Thousand, were shipped to Browning in the US, Fabrique Nationale (FN) made the gun for worldwide sales outside the United States. No more guns came into the US for 20 years. In 1923, Browning became "Browning Arms Co." and started importing guns from Belgium.


During the World War II years,when Remington took over production for Browning because the Belgium plant had been over run by the Nazi Germany armed forces.




Over 2,000,000 A-5's were produced in Belgium do the math they produced 1120 per day


Unable to answer without a detailed description of all features and markings.



They were first made and imported into the U.S. by Browning in the year 1903.The last year for Belgium made shotguns was 1975.


I can say that there were 463,700 made during the years 1903-1957.I will also say that Browning issued there 2,000,000th Commemorative model auto-5 shotgun model during 1971-1974.The firm of mirouku starting making the Browning auto-5 shotguns in 1976.


Your shotgun was made in Belgium in the year 1960.That makes it 53 years old.


87 years old.If you have a 12 gauge shotgun then it was made in 1906,if your shotgun is a 16 gauge,then it was made in the year 1919.


Browning made the "Baby Browning" in Belgium for several years, on the muzzel of this tiny 6 shot automatic it states .6mm. It does in fact take 25 caliber ammunition.


What model are you referring to? Most models came out in different years when made in different guages.




I can tell you that with the Western Field name, it's not a Browning product. This was a trade name used by Montgomery Ward. It may be marked with a Browning patent, but was probably made by Stevens/Savage.


your Browning auto-5 lightweight 12 gauge shotgun should bring between 300-500 dollars on today,s market depending on overall condition and a good bore.


== == S.N. info from this era gun is sketchy at best, this is the info from the Browning website: First 10,000 shipped to U.S. Marked with "BROWNING AUTOMATIC ARMS CO. OGDEN UTAH-U.S.A." Very few serial number records remain. This is odd because I have a gun w/ serial number 71h307 and it has that very marking on the barrel (perhaps the barrel was changed). supposedly the serial numbers ran from 1 - 228,000 from the years 1903 - 1939(again from the browning website).


I don't know how long you want to go back, but Browning has made their Citori model in 410, 28, 20, 16, and 12 gauges for more than thirty years.


Sounds like you have a Browning .22 automatic rifle. It was made in Belgium, not St. Louis. Browning had their Headquarters in St. Louis for many years. It's possible that you have a Grade II rifle which has the fine engraving on a silver receiver. If this is the case, it's recommended that you have the gun professionally appraised. Grade II autos have really gone up in value and command a premium on the collectors market in top condition. Any Gun shop can help you determine value. Be sure to find out the grade of your rifle. You can also use the link below for a ballpark figure.


Still are for special orders.Browning had the BAR semi-auto sporting rifles made there from 1967-1976.


The browning twelvette was made during the years 1957-1971.


Your Browning BAR semi-auto rifle was one of the first ones made and imported from Belgium in the year 1967.The M7 suffix is the indicator of the year of manufacture.In 1967 Browning began selling the BAR line of rifles.


Model years are usually changed in September or October.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.