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Answered 2013-11-09 09:04:22

The last year for copper Canadian pennies was 1996.

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Here's some information from the Royal Canadian Mint, where all our money is made:Pennies: Since 2000 pennies have been 94% steel, 1.5% nickel, 4.5% copper plating. From 1997 until 2000, the coin was made of copper-plated zinc. Prior to 1997 the one-cent coin was 98% copper, 1.75% zinc and 0.25% other metals.


The materials used to mint pennies has changed. Originally, pennies were made of almost pure copper. Today, British pennies are made of nickel/steel blanks coated in copper, and US "pennies" (actually cents) are made of zinc blanks coated in copper.


The reigning monarch of Canada. HM Queen Elizabeth II was featured on Canadian pennies from 1952 to 2012 (the Royal Canadian Mint ceased production of pennies in 2012).


Canada did not mint half pennies in 1965.


Copper pennies only have an external copper gilding. The US mint went to a copper coated zinc alloy many years ago.


This change happened in 1974. See the related question below for more information.


1932 Canadian pennies actually didn't have mintmarks.


Solid copper pennies were last minted in 1857 and were much larger than today's penny. Pennies were made mostly of copper until mid-1982, when the composition was changed to 97.5% zinc with a plating of 2.5% copper. The only exception was in 1943 when wartime copper shortages forced the Mint to make pennies out of scrap steel. Bronze cents were resumed the next year, 1944.


For metal content, or melt value, copper pennies (pre-1982) are worth about 2 cents each. As far as collector value, that depends more on specific dates, mint marks, and condition.


There were no 1910 steel pennies ever made. The pennies made in 1910 were made out of nearly pure copper.


Pennies are minted at three locations in the US; The San Francisco Mint, The Denver Mint and the Philadelphia Mint. Pennies from San Francisco have an "S" on them. Pennies from Denver have a "D" on them and pennies from Philadelphia have no letter.


If there is no mint mark the coin was made at the Philadelphia mint. It was not until 1979 that the "P" appeared on the penny. "P" mintmarks have NEVER been used on pennies.


Canadian cents, including the 1974, are copper colored, because they're made of or plated with copper. If you have a gold one, then someone other that the Royal Canadian Mint coated it with something else.


Yes. The pure copper rarities are: 1827 pennies (nearly all were shipped to Australia) 1843 pennies 1849 pennies 1856 pennies (with either a PLAIN or ORNAMENTAL trident) 1860 (with the 60 struck over a 59) pennies 1797 pennies and twopences were struck by Matthew Boulton at his Soho Mint in Birmingham. Unless in top grade, they have little value.


-In 1943, pennies were made out of steel instead of copper. A 1943 pure copper penny is a rare mint error, and is worth lots.


Because it is against the law to deface any money issued by the Royal Mint/ Government.


1982. Since then pennies have been mostly zinc with just a little copper.As the immediate above statement includes the word copper as part of the answer, which part is, in fact, true, then 1982 is not the answer to the question after all...If the "the(y)" part of the question above refers to the U.S., the U.S. government, or the U.S. Mint, then 1982 was the last mint year for 95% copper cents. Since mid-1982, the newest (current, as of 2012) composition for U.S. one-cent coins ("pennies") has an inner core alloy of 99.2% zinc with 0.8% copper, with the coin balance as an outer plating of pure copper, for a total coin composition of 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper. These current pennies are commonly called "zinc pennies". The composition of U.S. pennies from mid-1864 to mid-1982 was an alloy of 95% copper with either 5% tin-and-zinc ("bronze" pennies) or 5% zinc ("brass" pennies). Before that, the composition was an alloy of 88% copper with 12% nickel from mid-1857 to mid-1864 (the only time any pennies ever contained nickel), and, initially, from 1793 to mid-1857, the first U.S. pennies were made of pure (100%) copper.Since the first U.S. one-cent coins in 1793, U.S. pennies have always contained at least some copper, except for 1943, when they were made of a low-grade carbon steel and coated with zinc, having a grey color, due to the need for copper and brass during World War II. These are commonly referred to as "steel" pennies (they contain NO copper)...Therefore, the most correct answer to the question is either:(1) "they" (the U.S.) have never stopped making copper pennies, except in 1943; or(2) 1943 is the only year the U.S. stopped making copper pennies, or made pennies with NO copper in them.Hope this helps!


If "they" in the question refers to the U.S., the U.S. government, or the U.S. Mint, then 1982 was the last mint year for 95% copper Lincoln cents. Since mid-1982, the newest (current, as of 2012) formulation or composition for U.S. one-cent coins ("pennies") has an inner core alloy of 99.2% zinc with 0.8% copper, with the coin balance as an outer plating of pure copper, for a total coin composition of 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper. These current pennies are commonly called "zinc pennies". The composition of U.S. pennies from mid-1864 to mid-1982 was an alloy of 95% copper with either 5% tin-and-zinc ("bronze" pennies) or 5% zinc ("brass" pennies). Before that, the composition was an alloy of 88% copper with 12% nickel from mid-1857 to mid-1864 (the only time any pennies ever contained nickel), and, initially, from 1793 to mid-1857, the first U.S. pennies were made of pure copper.Since the first U.S. one-cent coins in 1793, U.S. pennies have always contained at least some copper, except for 1943, when they were made of a low-grade carbon steel and coated with zinc, having a grey color, due to the need for copper and brass during World War II.Therefore, the most correct answer to the question is either:(1) "they" (the U.S.) have never stopped making copper pennies, except in 1943; or(2) 1943 is the only year the U.S. stopped making copper pennies.Hope this helps!


Copper is a common metal, is relatively durable and the value of the metal will not exceed the face value of the coin. However, in the USA copper is no longer the primary metal in pennies. The price of copper has gone up to the point where there's more than 1¢ worth of copper in a penny, so back in 1982 the Mint changed the coin's composition to a zinc core plated with a thin layer of copper. In fact, the coin is now 97.5% zinc so there aren't copper pennies anymore.


The last copper coins minted by the Royal Mint were minted in 1860. Since then, "copper" coins have been made from bronze which, depending on the year, has a copper content of anything between 92% and 98% copper. More recently, in 1992, the Royal Mint changed from bronze 1 Penny and 2 Pence coins, to more cost effective copper plated steel coins.


There are no current plans to discontinue the penny, for a number of reasons ranging from public sentiment to the problems rounding would cause when sales taxes are applied. However, the Mint has been investigating possible changes to the coin's composition. The most likely candidate so far is copper-plated steel, similar to the metal used for Canadian cents and British pennies.


Copper pennies are worth at least 2 cents for their copper content. Without knowing details such as the date, mint mark (if applicable), and condition, there is absolutely no way to give a more specific answer.


Probably because of their impending involvement in WWII. They will have needed it '...for the war effort...'


In 2011, the U.S. Mint produced 4,938,540,000 pennies.


About 25¢ in average condition. Unlike the U.S., Canada continued to mint cents out of copper throughout WW2, so there are no "special" Canadian cents from that time period.



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