When was the church of Saint Nicholas built?

St. Nicolas Church, Ghent: early 1200's St. Nicolas Church, Abingdon: around 1170 St. Nicolas Church, Newport: in the 13th Century St. Nicolas Church, Cempuis: around 14th Century St. Nicolas Cathedral (now known as Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque): between 1298 and c.1400 Just in the county of Kent, in south-east England, there are churches dedicated to St Nicholas at the following places:

  • Sturry
  • Chislehurst
  • Leeds
  • St Nicholas-at-Wade
  • Ash
  • Barfreston(e)
  • Harbledown
  • Southfleet
  • New Romney
  • Sevenoaks
  • Sandhurst
  • Ringwould
  • Pluckley
  • Otham
  • Rochester
  • Boughton Malherbe
  • Linton
  • Deptford


There are many hundreds more churches dedicated to St Nicholas throughout England.

The church of St Nicholas at Barfreston(e) [the spelling of the village name is variable] is one of the very finest intact and mostly unaltered 12th century churches in England. It was built around 1180 by a knight of the de Port family who was based at Dover castle; there had probably been no church in the tiny village previously. It is adorned with some outstanding Romanesque stone carvings, both internal and external, and its interior was until the early 20th century beautifully painted in the Romanesque style (nothing remains of the wall paintings today). The building began to collapse after the medieval period due to ground subsidence and in the 19th century a fairly accurate restoration project was carried out to repair the damage. Windows and doors have in most churches been rebuilt in later medieval styles, but at Barfreston the original Norman doors and windows remain. It has only two "cells", the nave and chancel, and there is no tower - the bell hangs in a nearby yew tree (see link below):






Just in the county of Kent, in south-east England, there are churches dedicated to St Nicholas at the following places:

  • Sturry
  • Chislehurst
  • Leeds
  • St Nicholas-at-Wade
  • Ash
  • Barfreston(e)
  • Harbledown
  • Southfleet
  • New Romney
  • Sevenoaks
  • Sandhurst
  • Ringwould
  • Pluckley
  • Otham
  • Rochester
  • Boughton Malherbe
  • Linton
  • Deptford


There are many hundreds more churches dedicated to St Nicholas throughout England.

The church of St Nicholas at Barfreston(e) [the spelling of the village name is variable] is one of the very finest intact and mostly unaltered 12th century churches in England. It was built around 1180 by a knight of the de Port family who was based at Dover castle; there had probably been no church in the tiny village previously. It is adorned with some outstanding Romanesque stone carvings, both internal and external, and its interior was until the early 20th century beautifully painted in the Romanesque style (nothing remains of the wall paintings today). The building began to collapse after the medieval period due to ground subsidence and in the 19th century a fairly accurate restoration project was carried out to repair the damage. Windows and doors have in most churches been rebuilt in later medieval styles, but at Barfreston the original Norman doors and windows remain. It has only two "cells", the nave and chancel, and there is no tower - the bell hangs in a nearby yew tree (see link below):