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When wast the last successful drop kick in NCAA Division I football?

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2008-01-11 02:28:44
2008-01-11 02:28:44

A guess would be that Gene Simmons of West Virginia did it. Believe he played from 1948 to 1950. Drop kicked several successful extra points. Believe he successfully drop kicked a successful field goal against Maryland somewhere within this time span.

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