Physics

Which liquids are having less density than water?

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2014-09-17 19:40:05
2014-09-17 19:40:05

Volatile liquids such as alcohol and ethanol have less density than water. They also evaporate faster than water does.

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The density of air - or most gases - is much less than the density of typical solids and liquids.


That depends on the liquid. For most liquids, as the temperature decreases, the density increases. Water would be an exception since the density of ice is less than that of liquid water.


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Yes, this is the principle of buoyancy. This is what makes balloons float in the air and boats float on water.


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Anything that floats! Examples would be most woods, plastics, other liquids, and of course gases.


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Density of oil is less than water, all objects having density lower than water float in water.


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Saturn has a density that is less than that of water.


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The reason why ice floats on water is due to the anomalous behavior of water. Water, when cooled beyond 4oc, expands instead of contracting like other normal liquids. Due to this, the density of ice is less than that of water and it is able to float on water.


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Cooking oil has a density less than water.


The density of golfball is less then density of water


If you are referring to a high pressure gas, then yes. The higher the pressure, the higher the density of the gas because the molecules pack closer together. The density of liquids can also be affected by pressure but to much less of an extent. For most purposes, liquids such as water are considered incompressible.


A cork is less denser than water because cork is floating on water so it will have less density than water



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What is 3.785 liter in kilogram


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The density of water is specified as 1 gram per cubic centimeter. Any object having a density less than 1 gm/cc3 will float on water.



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