Planetary Science

Which planet has a density that is less than that of water?

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2016-11-14 04:43:47
2016-11-14 04:43:47

Saturn has a density that is less than that of water.

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Saturn has the least density. It is .7 on average. The density is less than waters density. So this planet "float" on water its so light.

It is not a matter of heaviness or lightness, but density, the average density of Saturn is less than the density of water.

It is said that if you could find an ocean on Earth large enough to accommodate it, Saturn would float. That is, Saturn's average density is less than the density of water. Turns out it's the only planet with an average density less than 1.000, that is, less than the density of water.

Saturn has the lowest density, its mean density is 0.687 g/cmยณ (less than water)

The density of steam is less than the density of water.

Saturn.It has a mean density of 0.687 g/cm3 which is less than water.

An object will float - on water for example - if its density is less than the density of water. Density = mass / volume.An object will float - on water for example - if its density is less than the density of water. Density = mass / volume.An object will float - on water for example - if its density is less than the density of water. Density = mass / volume.An object will float - on water for example - if its density is less than the density of water. Density = mass / volume.

Yes. Much less dense. Saturn is the least dense planet in the solar system, with an average density less than that of water. Earth is the densest planet in the solar system.

Saturn, with a density of 0.7 kg cm-3

Cooking oil has a density less than water.

Saturn has the smallest average density. It's actually less than ' 1 ', so if you can imagine an enormous ocean of water bigger than Saturn, the planet would actually float in water.

Saturn wins by a considerable margin. It's the only planet less dense than water.

-- If the object floats in water, then its density is less than the density of water. -- If the object sinks in water, then its density is more than the density of water. -- If the object floats in air, then its density is less than the density of air. -- If the object sinks in air, then its density is less than the density of air.

The density of Saturn is less than the density of water on Earth. But you'll never see Saturn float, because that would require a really gigantic pool.

A cork is less denser than water because cork is floating on water so it will have less density than water

Saturn has a very low density overall, on average it is 0.7 g/cm3, less than the density of water. It is the least dense planet in our solar system.

If it floats in water, it has a density less than water. Density of water is 1.0 g/mL

The "average" density of the object must be less than that of the water displaced.

Density is mass divided by volume. Saturn has a big mass AND a big volume. In this case the effect if the big volume is enough to "beat " the effect of the big mass and Saturn's density is less than water.

== == Saturn. With an average density of 0.7 grams/cubic centimeter,density less than that of water it could really float on water.

The density (mass/volume) of the oil is less than the density of water. It is the same reason that ice floats on the top of water, rather than sinking. The density of frozen water (ice) is less than the density of liquid water.

I think that it is Saturn, regardless of it being the 2nd largest planet in our solar system, it has a density of 0.678 grams per cubic centimeters, which is less than the density of water ( density โ‰ƒ 1 gram per cubic centimeters).

The weight does not determine if an object will float in water. If an object has a DENSITY that is more than the density of water then it will sink, if it's density is less than the density of water it will float.


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