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For a plural noun that ends with an s, place the apostrophe after the ending s.

For a plural noun that does not end with an s, place an apostrophe s at the end of the word.

Examples:

  • boy, boys = boys' - The boys' names are Mike and Mark.
  • man, men = men's - The men's names are Mike and Mark.
  • duck, ducks = ducks' - The ducks' eggs are sold at the farm stand.
  • goose, geese = geese's - The geese's eggs are sold at the farm stand.
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8y ago
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9y ago

Using an apostrophe to show possession:

For singular nouns, add an apostrophe s ('s) to the end of the word.

  • The dog's collar was red leather. (the collar of the dog)

For singular nouns that end with an s, there are two accepted forms for possessives:

Add an apostrophe (') after the existing s at the end of the word: boss'

Add an apostrophe s ('s) after the existing s at the end of the word: boss's

  • Put the mail on the boss' desk. (the desk of the boss)
  • Put the mail on the boss's desk. (the desk of the boss)

For plural nouns that end with an s, add an apostrophe after the ending s (s').

  • The dogs' collars have their names on a tag. (the collars of the dogs)

For irregular plural nouns that do not end with s, add an apostrophe s ('s) to the end of the word, the same as for singular nouns.

  • The children's playground is freshly painted. (the playground for children)
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9y ago

For singular nouns, add an apostrophe s ('s) to the end of the word.
Example: The dog's collar was red leather. (the collar of the dog)


For singular nouns that end with an s, there are two accepted forms for possessives:

  • Add an apostrophe (') after the existing s at the end of the word: boss'
  • Add an apostrophe s ('s) after the existing s at the end of the word: boss's

Examples:

Put the mail on the boss' desk. (the desk of the boss)

Put the mail on the boss's desk. (the desk of the boss)

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10y ago

For a regular plural noun, ending in -s, the apostrophe is added after the -s (s').

For an irregular plural noun that does not end in -s, an apostrophe -s ('s) is added to the end of the word. Examples:

  • animals; the animals' health
  • boys; the boys' soccer team
  • children; the children's playground
  • teeth; the teeth's whiteness
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13y ago

You use possessives when you want to state that something owns something. Examples (Possessive nouns are in bold)

That bike is Mary's

Josh's homework is finished.

The Book's pages are all wet.

The Computer's monitor was messed up.

Mainly, you write a possessive noun by writing the noun down, followed by 's. Unless the noun ends in an S. In that case, you just put an apostrophe at the end of the word.

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11y ago

For singular nouns, an apostrophe s ('s) is placed at the end of the word. For plural noun that already end with an s, place an apostrophe (') after the ending s.

Example singular possessive nouns:

the cover of the book = the book's cover

the teacher of our class = our class's teacher

the coat of the child = the child's coat

the shoes of the man = the man's shoes

the house of the neighbor = my neighbor's house

Example plural possessive nouns:

the covers of the books = the books' covers

the assembly of classes = the classes' assembly

the coats of the children = the children's coats

shoes for men = men's shoes

the houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' houses

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9y ago

All possessive nouns (singular and plural) use an apostrophe to show possession.

For plural nouns that end with s, add an apostrophe after the ending s.

Example: Their boys' ages are six and ten.

For plural nouns that do not end with s, add an apostrophe s to the end of the word.

Example: Their children's ages are six and ten.

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14y ago

An apostrophe is used to show possession in English. See examples below.

The dog's bark is obnoxious.

The cats' tails all wagged.

James's cat is crazy!

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Q: Why can you add apostrophes in some plural possessive nouns?
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Related questions

What are some plural possessive nouns that start with n?

Some plural possessive nouns that start with letter N are:nations'necklaces'needles'neighbors'nerves'nights'noodles'noses'nuts'nylons'


Does apostrophes have an apostrophe?

The word apostrophe forms a normal plural as apostrophes.The possessive forms would be:apostrophe's (singular) - "The apostrophe's use in contractions is fairly standardized."apostrophes' (plural) - "The apostrophes' positions are wrong in some of his words."


Do all words have a plural possessive form?

No, not all words have a distinct plural possessive form. Some singular possessive forms can be used to indicate possession for both singular and plural nouns. For example, "children's" can be used for the plural possessive of "child" and "children."


How do you pluralize compound possessive nouns?

To pluralize compound possessive nouns, add an apostrophe and an "s" to the last word of the compound noun. For example, "my brothers-in-law's car" is the possessive form of the compound noun "brothers-in-law" in plural form.


How do know a word is plural or possessive?

A word is plural when it refers to more than one item, while a word is possessive when it shows ownership or belonging. Plural nouns typically end in -s, -es, or -ies, while possessive nouns are often formed by adding 's or just an apostrophe ('), depending on the word.


Do you put an apostrophe for ownership on its?

Possessive pronouns do not take apostrophes. Some examples of possessive pronouns are: its, hers, his, theirs.


How do you form the possessive of noun?

To form the possessive of a noun, add an apostrophe and an "s" ('s) after the noun. For plural nouns ending in "s," just add an apostrophe after the "s" ('). For plural nouns not ending in "s," add an apostrophe and an "s" ('s).


Do any singular possessive nouns end in n't?

No, singular possessive (and some plural possessive) nouns end with -'s.Many contractions end with -n't, words that are joined together with missing letter(s) denoted by an apostrophe. Examples:do not = don'tcan not = can'twere not = weren'twould not = wouldn'tcould not = couldn'tshould not = shouldn't


What noun does not have a plural?

Some nouns that are the same for the singular and the plural are:deerfishelksheepoffspringSome nouns are singular but appear to be plural; words that are a short form for 'a pair of...'. There is no plural for these nouns, the plurals are expressed by using 'pairs of...'. Some examples are:pantsshortsglassesscissorsbinocularsUncountable nouns have no plural form and take a verb for the singular. Some uncountable nouns are:moneyinformationnewsadviceelectricity


What is the plural possessive of datum?

The plural of datum is data. The plural possessive is data's.E.g. The data's theft put some customer accounts at risk.


Forming possessive nouns?

To form possessive nouns, add an apostrophe and the letter "s" ('s) to the end of a singular noun, or just an apostrophe after a plural noun. For example, "The book belonging to Sarah" becomes "Sarah's book," and "The books of the students" becomes "the students' books."


When do you use an apostrophe to make a word plural?

You don't.Apostrophes should never be used to form plural words. This is grammatically incorrect, though unfortunately common, as apostrophes are greatly misunderstood.Apostrophes are commonly, but erroneously, used in numbers such as calendar decades or centuries instead of using the correct form, e.g. 1800s or the 1970s.In some situations it is acceptable to use an apostrophe to clarify the plural Of lower case letters For example, "Make sure you dot all the i's and cross all the t's". This, however, is not an established rule.So: when should apostrophes be used?Apostrophes should only be used for possessive nouns (but not pronouns), e.g. the cat's food dish; Roger's BMW. They are not used in possessive pronouns, e.g. yours, ours, theirs, its.They are also used for omissions in contractions, e.g. it'smeaning it is (note the difference in how its is used in the previous sentence) or can'tmeaning cannot.