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Why does a thermometer rise up when its hot?

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2012-02-28 08:32:41
2012-02-28 08:32:41

Usually when a thing gets hot, it expands. The liquid in the thermometer gets hot, and expands, so it takes up more room in the tube.

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Because that liquid in thermometer is actually a kind of metal called mercury (atomic symbol Hg). And like all metals it expand when heated. Hot water contains heat. --------------------------------------------- Because the liquid in the thermometer expands when it is warmed. As it expand it takes up more space and therefore rises up the measuring tube of the thermometer.There is liquid in some thermometer but, most have chemicals in it!!!!!!!!!!!


The substance in the thermometer (traditionally mercury (Hg)) rises up because of thermal expansion. As the substance heats up, it expands.


It Works by the heat or the cold like if your hot your body temperature changes so that your body becomes hotter. The ink will become hot and rise up, the ink will be cold an go down.


the heat and temperature that causes it to rise and fall.


When temperature goes up the liquid expands. The liquid then takes up more space and you see this as a rise in scale on the thermometer. The same applies vise versa


The heat on the outside of the thermometer transfers to the glass which transfers to the alcohol making the alcohol expand making it rise


Mercury does not fall or rise in a clinical thermometer when taken out from the mouth because of the KINK present in it.


Alcohol in a thermometer rises whenever the temperature of its surrounding increases. As the temperature increases, the heat causes the alcohol to expand ever so slightly, which shows up as an increase of height of the alcohol in the tube of the thermometer.


the fire is the main object to allow the hot air ballon rise up .


Mabey you need to get a new thermometer. it may be broken. or if you were working out then you could have burning up skin and feel hot and have no fever.


Hot gases tend to rise because it is less dense. As molecular motion speeds up so does the distribution of molecules.


When a thermometer is quickly dipped in hot water, it won't do anything. If you leave the thermometer in the hot water, the temperature shown will read higher. The temperature shown will not exceed the temperature of the water.


It depends on what type if you have the one with the red stuff going up the tube that is called a Mercury Thermometer this works when it is hot the mercury heats up and expands and the thermometer reads hotter and when it is colder the Mercury cools and contracts and the thermometer reads cooler.


if its really really hot it will fry but if its just hot then it will just go up really high


The hot pressure{air}builds up so the balloon goes up.


That depends on how hot the water is in the cup. Use the thermometer to measure it and see.


it will rise it will rise


Scientists use a thermometer to measure how cold or how hot an object is.


No, the temperature of hot tea is substantially higher than the maximum that a clinical thermometer is designed for.


You can get a thermometer and see how hot it is coming out. Match this number up to the thermostat reading.


Omg super hot To a thermometer he's probably infinity hot


The liquid in thermometers expands when temperature increases (and contracts when temperature decreases). When it expands, the only place for it to expand 'to' is up the thermometer (into the empty space above it).


Heat is the energy of the hot air. Therefore hot air rises


A deformation thermometer measures temperature by the mercury or alcohol in the thermometer being touched by heat. The cold makes the liquid in the thermometer retract, and heat makes it rise or expand.


Because hot air is lighter than cold air.



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